Out of Darkness

Out of DarknessOut of Darkness: My Story of Finding True Light and Liberation by Stormie Omartian

Hard to read at times, because the subject matter is so heart-rending. Omartian had a horrific childhood and it’s amazing to read her story and realize what she overcame.

The writing is fine, but more serviceable than spellbinding. If you’re familiar with her books such as The Power of a Praying Wife (and all the other related titles) it’s inspiring to learn how she developed into the woman of prayer she became.

If you’re not a believer, I don’t think the book would be as interesting to you. It also helps if you’re familiar with her writing or musical career. I had no idea of her musical abilities and hadn’t heard of her husband Michael Omartian (that probably says more about my obliviousness than anything else).

She’s got a previous memoir, Stormie, but I never read that and can’t say how this one differs from it.

Recommended for those who have liked her other books, or those who looking for a story of transformation and redemption.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Stormie Omartian tells her compelling story of a childhood marred by physical and emotional abuse that eventually led her into the occult, drugs, and tragic relationships.

Finding herself overwhelmed by fear and on the verge of suicide, she shares the turning point that changed her life and reveals the healing process that brought freedom and wholeness beyond what she ever imagined.

In this poignant drama, there is help and hope for anyone who has been scarred by the past or feels imprisoned by deep emotional needs. It is a glorious story of how God can bring life out of death, life out of darkness.

Book Details

Title: Out of Darkness: My Story of Finding True Light and Liberation
Author: Stormie Omartian
Category: Nonfiction / Memoir
My Rating: 3 Stars

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a review. I was not required to write a positive review and all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Summer Reading and Plans

Blogging has been sparse lately – I’ve had good plans (and I have posts to write) but time and energy have been lacking. Last week I was on vacation (yay!) and I took my laptop with the idea that I’d get caught up on posts there. Hah! I had some time while the baby napped, and the big kids were with their grandparents, but I was so exhausted that I didn’t do anything on the computer at all. The downside is I didn’t get caught up or even ahead on posting, but the plus is that I did recharge. :)

Saving CeeCee HoneycuttI also did a fair amount of reading – I finished As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust, Big Little Lies, and Saving CeeCee Honeycutt. I almost finished listening to Harry Potter #1, and made progress in You Are Not So Smart and Grace at Bender Springs. And of course I read each of the books I brought for my youngest about 100 times, because how can I resist her when she repeats “read?” “story?” “book?”

While I like going on vacation before the summer really starts – it wasn’t as hot, and it was much less crowded – now vacation is over and we’re still not finished with school, so it’s back to the regular routine. In many ways it would have felt more satisfying to finish the school year and then travel.

Ramona and Her FatherWe’ve only got five days left though, so G should wrap up everything this week. I’m still debating having him do some math during the summer, but I am definitely going to require him to do some reading every day. And of course I’m going to continue to read aloud to all of the kids throughout the summer. First on the agenda is Ramona and Her Father. G has loved the Ramona series, so usually as soon as we finish one we’ve moved into the next one. This summer I’m also looking at reading him some Astrid Lindgren, and Roald Dahl, and additional titles to be determined later. :)

Climbing the Mango TreesI’m also thinking about making myself a summer reading list. I’ve never done that before (at least since high school I haven’t) so I’m not sure why I’m considering it this year – maybe as a way of prioritizing my reading, since I am reading so much less lately? Book club titles would have to go on the list first, so that will be The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe (as a readaloud to the big kids), Better Than Before (a reread), The Cuckoo’s Calling, Climbing the Mango Trees, The Slightly True Story of Cedar B. Hartley, and Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence. That takes me through August for all three of my bookclubs (I’ve already read the other three titles those clubs will be reading over the summer).

Thrice the Brinded Cat Hath Mew'dBeyond that, I’m not sure what I’ll end up prioritizing. I do want to read Stars Above, and I just got it from the library again after having to return it unread earlier this year. I’ve got lots of nonfiction on my TBR list, but I haven’t been in that much of a nonfiction reading mood. I’m looking forward to the latest Flavia de Luce mystery (Thrice the Brinded Cat Hath Mew’d), but that’s not scheduled until September. September is also when Shauna Niequist’s new book Present Over Perfect is releasing, so that should be a nice month for new books!

Give Your Child the WorldThinking of new releases also reminds me that Jamie Martin’s book Give Your Children the World comes out next month! I preordered it ages ago, and it seemed like forever until it would be published. Now it’s only two more weeks, and I can’t wait to see it. I am such a sucker for book lists, and the sneak peek I saw of this one makes me think it’ll be fantastic. I’ve already got my daughter’s school books planned for her Kindergarten year, but I may be making some changes after flipping through this title.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Homeschooling Kindergarten, Round Two: The Plans

This August will mark something new: my first time officially homeschooling TWO students.

The Familiar

Sonlight Core P 4 5While I already have the same Sonlight material I used so successfully with my oldest for his Kindergarten year, I was not completely enthusiastic about doing it again exactly the same. Apparently I get bored easily. :)

So, in the interests of keeping my interest level high, I’m making some adaptations for my daughter’s year. Here’s the plan:

I will still be doing Sonlight’s P 4/5 level, more or less. I will almost certainly skip the Uncle Wiggly book again – while I’d like to say that I’ll try it and see if H likes it more than G did, I probably won’t because *I* hated reading the book so much. Sorry kiddo! I have the sequel to Milly Molly Mandy and will add it in instead.

I will skip some of the Children’s Book of Virtues – I really liked some of the stories and poems in the book, and really disliked others, so I’ll stick to the ones I enjoyed and skip the ones I didn’t.

The New

BYL K Around the WorldThe plan (this could change if things do not go well, or if life gets overwhelming) is to add in the Build Your Library Kindergarten schedule, more or less. It’s a round-the-world plan, which looks fun, and I already owned several of the books. I like the idea of spending some time in each continent, and we can add extra picture books from the library. It has a few simple crafts projects, and they may even be simple enough for me to manage them. It also schedules in cooking projects, and the kids are SUPER excited about that.

It’s unlikely I would have added this in if it wasn’t such an inexpensive option – I spotted it during a sale and so got it for under $20. I did spend a bit more adding some of the books for it (the spines for the year; the others I’ll get from the library) but they’re all really nice books I don’t mind adding to my collection.

Language Arts

AAR 1 Activity BookFor reading instruction, I’ll follow H’s lead. She says she wants to learn how to, but I’ve tried All About Reading Level 1 with her and she wasn’t quite ready back in February when she first asked. I would rather not push her at all and wait until she really is ready. I expect once that happens she’ll fly through it like her brother did.

Just to try something new, I got her the Reason for Handwriting book. I suspect not having her do everything exactly like her brother did will be a good thing for her, and handwriting is an easy one to vary. Her handwriting is already far ahead of where his was at that age, and I wouldn’t be all that surprised if she passes him this year.

Mathematics

I’ve got the same Mathematical Reasoning books I used with G waiting for her as well, and she’s been happily using some of the Preschool ones from them. Since I already have Miquon books, I may give them another try and let her play with them a bit.

Science

Berenstain Bear's Big Book of Science and NatureIt’s already included in both the Sonlight P 4/5 guide and BYL K guide, and I’ll likely do both, since it’s almost entirely reading science books. The Sonlight books were some of our favorites for that entire year, and I know she’s going to love hearing them – my son saw the Berenstain Bears and How to Dig a Hole to the Other Side of the World books in the pile I was showing her and got so excited for her that she was going to get to hear them. Plus I’m a big fan of the Robert Wells books included (and I bought a couple extras from that series I like them so much). I’m halfway considering adding another science curriculum to the mix, again, just to keep from doing the exact same things as I did with her brother. That’s a big “maybe.”

Bible

Sonlight schedules the 101 Favorite Stories from the Bible, and I’ll probably read those and then move into another story Bible when we finish that one. I think with her brother the next one we read was the Jesus Storybook Bible (love that one!) and I may do the same with her. Or I’m considering a curriculum I can do with both of them together, but that’s still up in the air a bit as I haven’t found anything that looks like what I want and is appropriate for their ages.

Extras

The Deliberate Reader US and Canada GeoPuzzleShe’s continuing with taekwondo, and is currently a senior orange belt. Awana will start up again in September, and it’ll be her first year in Sparks – she is *so* excited about that!

She’s asked to do soccer in the fall, so I’m looking into that possibility. She also desperately wants to take dance lessons, so it’s another option I’ve got to investigate.

And of course I’ve got all the fun Timberdoodle games and materials that I used with her brother at this age. I know I’ll pull out the GeoPuzzles (these are SO AWESOME) and Lift the Flap Picture Atlas as we go to each new continent. She’s also wanting to use the Look Inside Your Body they include in their Kindergarten kits, and I may get her some of the art items for her birthday – she LOVES art. I did get her a world coloring book to add in with her geography studies – it was so inexpensive I couldn’t resist.

That’s the plan for the year, but I’m sure there will be some modifications as we go. I have no idea how it will really be doing school with two, but I anticipate the real challenge coming from the youngest, who will turn two right after we start back to school.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Find the Good by Heather Lende

Find the GoodFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary WriterFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende by Heather Lende

I really liked the focus in Lende’s latest book – it could so easily have been a depressing read (and some of the stories did bring tears to my eyes), but it’s not. It’s touching and heart-warming, and encouraging. It’s also really easy to read in small snippets of time so if you’re in a stage of life where you don’t have much time to devote to concentrated reading this may help you satisfy your bookish needs.

Part memoir, part essay collection, it’s not exactly either. But it’s an enjoyable and easy read, and perfectly fit my reading mood one afternoon.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
As the obituary writer in a spectacularly beautiful but often dangerous spit of land in Alaska, Heather Lende knows something about last words and lives well lived. Now she’s distilled what she’s learned about how to live a more exhilarating and meaningful life into three words: find the good. It’s that simple–and that hard.

Quirky and profound, individual and universal, Find the Good offers up short chapters that help us unlearn the habit–and it is a habit–of seeing only the negatives. Lende reminds us that we can choose to see any event–starting a new job or being laid off from an old one, getting married or getting divorced–as an opportunity to find the good. As she says, “We are all writing our own obituary every day by how we live. The best news is that there’s still time for additions and revisions before it goes to press.”

Ever since Algonquin published her first book, the New York Times bestseller If You Lived Here, I’d Know Your Name, Heather Lende has been praised for her storytelling talent and her plainspoken wisdom. The Los Angeles Times called her “part Annie Dillard, part Anne Lamott,” and that comparison has never been more apt as she gives us a fresh, positive perspective from which to view our relationships, our obligations, our priorities, our community, and our world.

An antidote to the cynicism and self-centeredness that we are bombarded with every day in the news, in our politics, and even at times in ourselves, Find the Good helps us rediscover what’s right with the world.

Book Details

Title: Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary WriterFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende
Author: Heather Lende
Category: Nonfiction / Memoir / Essays
My Rating: 3 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on the Stack in April 2016

New on the Stack in March 2016Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.

First, apologies for not sharing a round-up of books shared in the last link up. I think that’s the first time I haven’t managed it, and I missed it!

In case it wasn’t obvious by my light posting schedule in April, I was swamped by life and had to skip a lot of my planned blog content. I’m still catching up on things, and this month’s New on the Stack link up snuck up on me! I’m writing this the night before, and hoping I can remember everything I added to my reading stack last month. :)

Nonfiction

Empire of the Summer MoonEmpire of the Summer Moon by S. C. Gwynne

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s May’s book for my Facebook book club.

The Complete PersepolisThe Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Persepolis is June’s book for my family book club. The library had it as a combined volume only, which is ok with me.

Better Than BeforeBetter Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s July’s book for my in-person book club.

Fiction

Shadow SpinnerShadow Spinner by Susan Fletcher

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s May’s book for my family book club.

Tomorrow When the World BeganTomorrow When the World Began by John Marsden

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m still trying to figure out a great YA book for my family book club for August.

The Mystery of the Blue TrainThe Mystery of the Blue Train by Agatha Christie

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Needed some Agatha in my reading life.

Saving CeeCee HoneycuttSaving CeeCee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s under consideration for a future book club pick.

Looking for AlibrandiLooking for Alibrandi by Melina Marchetta

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m still trying to figure out a great YA book for my family book club for August.

Jasper JonesJasper Jones by Craig Silvey

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m still trying to figure out a great YA book for my family book club for August.

EonEon by Alison Goodman

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember why it was on my list, but my turn finally arrived.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

 Loading InLinkz ...

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Introducing May’s Book Club Selection: Empire of the Summer Moon

Empire of the Summer MoonMay’s book for the Facebook book club is Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American HistoryEmpire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S. C. Gwynne by S. C. Gwynne

What It’s About

Excerpt from Goodreads:

[A] vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all.

Why Was This Title Selected

I wanted a history book for the year, and liked how this focused on a less-familiar time period and subject. Reviews led me to believe it would be fairly readable (not too academic or dry, even if the topic may be challenging), and I’ve found that most of the time books written by journalists tend to be engaging. So, despite no experience with Gwynne’s work, I was hoping that would hold true for him as well.

Anything Else to Know About It?

It was a Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for History and Biography in 2010.

It’s available in print, for Kindle, and on Audible. Heads-up! If you purchase the Kindle version, you can add the Audible version for $3.95.

Discussion about the book is starting next week, so if you’re a fast reader you may still have time to grab the book and join us, but it’s not the quickest read so instead you may want to bow out of this month’s discussion and instead join us next month.

However, don’t delay joining the Facebook group entirely – request to join this week, as I’m delaying starting the book discussion to give us all more time to finish Empire of the Summer Moon and instead will be posting more general bookish questions.

What’s Coming Up in June?

Big Little LiesBig Little LiesBig Little Lies by Liane Moriarty by Liane Moriarty.

Don’t be put off from reading June’s novel because of its length: it is a long one, but Moriarty is easy to read and her books read much quicker than you’d expect based on their size. This should be an easy read after the challenging book for May. Find out more about it at Goodreads.

It’s available in print, for Kindle, or on Audible. .

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.

See all the books we’ll be reading in 2016 here.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Reading about Iran

Interested in joining in with us for the Reading Together: A Family Exploration Book Club? Our theme for May and June is Iran, and you’ve still got time to find the books and join our new co-host Katie from Cakes, Tea, and Dreams for the discussion.

RTFEBC Iran Books

What are the three books we’ve selected? The picture book is Forty Fortunes by Aaron Shepard, illustrated by Alisher Dianov. (Can’t find it? I’ll list some other suggestions below). The elementary grade book to be discussed in May is Shadow Spinner by Susan Fletcher, and the middle grade / teen book for June is Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.

Want some additional picture book options?

If your kids are anything like mine, you can run through a half dozen picture books in a day, and they like nothing more than doing just that. In case you can’t easily locate Forty Fortunes, or if you just want more options, here are some more possibilities. Asterisks (*) mark ones I especially enjoyed, and the tilde (~) denotes one I haven’t actually seen, thanks to it vanishing off my library holds shelf before I could borrow it.

Chat about the books

We’d love to chat about the books with you in the Facebook group – tell us what you & your family think about the titles, or share additional ideas for books (or crafts, or food) that connect to the theme!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Savor by Shaun Niequist

Station Eleven (and a linkup!)

Station ElevenI am a post-apocalyptic wimp. I had to force myself to get through Emily St. John Mandel’s Station ElevenStation Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, and it’s not because the book is poorly written. Her writing is beautiful, and the story compelling. Too compelling for me, as I get anxious when reading about civilization collapsing and find myself wanting to go stockpile food and learn about survival techniques.

I did better with the book once the storyline moved past the immediate the-world-is-imploding moments and it was either clearly before the collapse or after. Something about the time right as it’s happening gets to me. 😉

Fortunately for everyone in the Facebook group who wanted to discuss the book, they didn’t have to wait on me to finish it (I was so late with this one), as there was a guest facilitator. And the discussions were wonderful – lots of interesting perspectives on the book, and post-apocalyptic literature in general.

It’s hard to give a rating to this sort of book. It’s a 5-star read in many ways – the writing, the characters, how thought-provoking it is. And yet because it’s so hard for me to read this genre it feels wrong in some ways for me to give it a 5 star rating. Those are reserved for the books I LOVE, so even though I can acknowledge that it’s a fabulous book, I think I have to only give it 4 stars.

So, go! Read this book, unless you’re a goofball like me who then feels the need to start hoarding all the survival items I can think of. And even then, you might still read it because it is a great book, and I just have issues.

Looking ahead at next month, we’ll start our discussion on Empire of the Summer MoonEmpire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History by S. C. Gwynne on May 9th – I’m starting it a week later because it’s a slower read (and I need time to finish). There will be a linkup for posts relating to the book on May 31st.


If you’ve written a post about Station Eleven, you’re welcome to add it to the linkup below.

Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share a post about the book. Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to The Deliberate Reader – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open for two weeks.

4. Please visit the person’s blog who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs or comments from your linked post.

 Loading InLinkz ...

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

When My Name Was Keoko (and a linkup)

When My Name Was KeokoApril continued with the theme of Korea for our family book club, and the book selection is a favorite of mine: When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park, by Linda Sue Park.

Because of the ages of my children (my oldest is only 6), it’s not one I read aloud to them, but I do plan on either having them read it themselves eventually, or reading it to them when they’re older.

I’m reasonably well-read about World War II and that era, but I hadn’t realized that Korea was occupied by Japan before and during the war. Or at least if I’d heard it it hadn’t really sunk in at all. Park’s story brings that time period to life, and yet does so in a way that’s not too graphic for younger readers, although as always I’d recommend that you know your reader if you’re worried about suitability.

If you read When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park, either for yourself, or with your family, what did you think of it? There’s also a blog linkup if you posted about the book (or theme), and any posts will automatically show up on the joint linkup, hosted by Moira (Hearth and Homefront) and Jessica (Quirky Bookworm). Add your post once from any one of our sites, and it will automatically appear in the linkup on their blogs.


RTFEBC Korea

Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share a post about reading this book or one of the themed picture books. Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to one of the host’s posts.

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting us permission to use and/or repost photographs or comments from your linked post.

 Loading InLinkz ...


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

March 2016 Recap

March RecapMarch brought a lot more reading than February did for me (seriously though, at only 3 books for me finished in February, it wasn’t hard for March to have more.) I’m maybe out of my reading slump? Except trying to get through my book club’s April pick is slowing me down. As I said in the Facebook group, I have issues with post-apocalyptic novels, and this one is reminding me why I thought I’d need a push to get the novel read.

March 2016 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 9
Books Read For The Year: 19

Things That Happened
  • M is getting so much more verbal lately – she says so many words, and it’s adorable. Most of them are pretty understandable too, even to people other than her mother. 😉
  • I was sick for about 10 days, and then R was sick. The big kids were healthy, and even though the baby had a cold so all in all it was that much more exhausting for me when I was not feeling well and they were all energetic and ready to DO THINGS.
  • G is trucking along in his new homeschool curriculum, and I’m loving really getting into history with him. What we had been doing was just a light introduction into things, and now it’s going beyond the introduction. I will admit that I am not very interested in Ancient Egypt, so we’ll see how much my personal interest remains once we really get into that topic. :)
  • We chatted about The Chosen, and there was a guest facilitator, which was so helpful for me as swamped as I felt most of the month. Next month for Station ElevenStation Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel there’s another guest facilitator as well – hooray! Even better, I like the different style it’s brought to the discussions.
Best Things I Did or Saw
  • Little kids + Easter egg hunts = adorable.
  • Stretching this category to include “heard” – baby M saying her name finally! She can’t get it exactly right, but it’s super cute.
  • We wrapped up Financial Peace University, and it is *so* motivating. I highly recommend it! I’ve got my mile-long to do list of things to take care of thanks to the class, but I think getting them done will help with my peace of mind.
What’s Cooking
  • I made an April Fool’s Day pizza for the kids. It’s was supposed to look like a savory pizza, but it’s actually a dessert pizza. I say “supposed to” because the picture of it did, but my attempt at it did not really. The marshmallow fluff that looked like fresh mozzarella cheese in the picture kind of melted and oozed everywhere in my version. G loved it though and had no complaints about the messy appearance. H refused to try it thanks to the strawberry sauce.
  • We were supposed to host Easter, but R called one of his aunts and asked if we could not (see above entry about us being sick.) We were healthy to go to it, but trying to reclaim the house after almost 3 weeks of one or the other of us being ill? That wasn’t happening in time. Such a relief to not have to worry about it, and instead of being responsible for coordinating the meal and providing the main course, I only had to bring a side dish and dessert. Carrot casserole and lemon bars = easy.
What I’m Anticipating in April
  • Book club – A Town Like Alice in my in-person book club and Station Eleven in the Facebook group.
  • My mother-in-law will be visiting for a week, and I am so hoping to get caught up on life, and maybe even get ahead on some things. Fingers crossed, because realistically a week isn’t enough time for everything I’d like to do. Time to start prioritizing, and the number one, must-get-these-done thing? Taxes.
  • Baseball starts for G, and the kids may have belt testing mid-month.
  • We will be doing all sorts of adulting things in April. By which I mean we’ll be finalizing updated wills and guardianship paperwork and all of that. I’m also hoping to get increased life insurance on both of us. Three kids you know. And yes, the third child is turning two this August, but we’re only just now getting to it. In case you’re wondering, yes, this is related to working through the Dave Ramsey Financial Peace seminar.
Books I Read

Asterisks mark ones I especially enjoyed.

  1. Enna Burning by Shannon Hale
  2. * The Chosen by Chaim Potok
  3. * Teaching from Rest: A Homeschooler’s Guide to Unshakable Peace by Sarah Mackenzie
  4. Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
  5. Born Reading: Bringing Up Bookworms in a Digital Age — From Picture Books to eBooks and Everything in Between by Jason Boog
  6. Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary WriterFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende by Heather Lende
  7. * A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
  8. Out of Darkness: My Story of Finding True Light and Liberation by Stormie Omartian
  9. River Secrets by Shannon Hale

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!