Recent Sequel Readalouds

I’m getting backlogged on writing about our readalouds (we’re moving through them faster now) so here’s a post catching me up to date on some of the sequels and pseudo-sequels I’ve read to my son, with my daughter listening in as she wants.

More Milly Molly MandyMore Milly-Molly-MandyMore Milly-Molly-Mandy by Joyce Lankester Brisley by Joyce Lankester Brisley

We’re all fans of Milly-Molly-Mandy, and this book is a not-essential sequel to the Sonlight book we read last year, The Milly-Molly-Mandy StorybookThe Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook by Joyce Lankester Brisley. If you liked the first set of stories, you’ll likely enjoy this as well. It’s more of the same, with no surprises. However, it’s not really necessary to have read the first book, as you’ll quickly catch up on the setting and characters. These are excellent first-chapter books, as each chapter stands on its own, and helps develop those listening skills.


Penny and PeterPenny and PeterPenny and Peter by Carolyn Haywood by Carolyn Haywood

This sequel picks up right where Here’s a Penny left off. This book has a lot less of his next door friend, and the focus is instead on Peter as well as Penny (no surprise with the title). Another one where if you liked the first, you’ll probably like this one too. I would recommend not reading this one before Here’s a Penny – you’ll spoil yourself as far as some particulars go.


Dolphin TreasureDolphin TreasureDolphin Treasure by Wayne Grover, illustrated by Jim Fowler by Wayne Grover, illustrated by Jim Fowler

My son was not into this one as much as the first book, Dolphin Adventure. I’m not sure why, as I felt they were pretty similar stories, although this one did take a bit longer to get to the point of any significant action. That’s probably enough of a reason for him to have been less interested in it. :)


Five True Dog StoriesFive True Dog StoriesFive True Dog Stories by Margaret Davidson by Margaret Davidson

A sentimental favorite for me, as I’d read this as a child, and recognized the stories and the illustrations. My son really liked 4 of the stories, but one of them did not keep his interest at all. I prefer this book to the Five True Horse Stories, so if you’re debating between them, go for this one. And yes, this isn’t a true sequel, but more of another book in a similar style.

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Two years ago: Book Review: Buried in the Sky by Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan
Three years ago: Reading Less / Reading More

Mr. Churchill’s Secretary by Susan Elia MacNeal

Mr. Churchill's SecretaryMr. Churchill’s Secretary: A Maggie Hope MysteryMr. Churchill's Secretary: A Maggie Hope Mystery by Susan Elia MacNeal by Susan Elia MacNeal

A great cover, appealing setting, and promising start gave me high hopes for this mystery series debut. Unfortunately the book felt super contrived and never managed to make me feel like it really was taking place during World War II – it was so obviously written recently, and placed into that setting. The characterizations are poor and the plotting is weak.

That said, it was a really quick read and I enjoyed the pacing. I also really *wanted* to like it, and the main character, so much so that I’m hoping the issues I had with the book were all related to it being the author’s first, and that she’ll improve with more practice. I love the covers and the premise behind the series so much I’m giving her another shot with book two, Princess Elizabeth’s Spy.

So, should you read it? Until I have a chance to see how book # 2 is, I’d say if you haven’t already read the Maisie Dobbs series, I’d highly recommend them instead. The time period isn’t exactly the same, but it’s a stronger series. If you want the same sort of light-and-breezy feel this one offers, look at the Daisy Dalrymple series by Carola Dunn, beginning with Death at Wentwater Court.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
For fans of Jacqueline Winspear, Laurie R. King, and Anne Perry, Mr. Churchill’s Secretary captures the drama of an era of unprecedented challenge—and the greatness that rose to meet it.

London, 1940. Winston Churchill has just been sworn in, war rages across the Channel, and the threat of a Blitz looms larger by the day. But none of this deters Maggie Hope. She graduated at the top of her college class and possesses all the skills of the finest minds in British intelligence, but her gender qualifies her only to be the newest typist at No. 10 Downing Street. Her indefatigable spirit and remarkable gifts for codebreaking, though, rival those of even the highest men in government, and Maggie finds that working for the prime minister affords her a level of clearance she could never have imagined—and opportunities she will not let pass. In troubled, deadly times, with air-raid sirens sending multitudes underground, access to the War Rooms also exposes Maggie to the machinations of a menacing faction determined to do whatever it takes to change the course of history.

Ensnared in a web of spies, murder, and intrigue, Maggie must work quickly to balance her duty to King and Country with her chances for survival. And when she unravels a mystery that points toward her own family’s hidden secrets, she’ll discover that her quick wits are all that stand between an assassin’s murderous plan and Churchill himself.

In this daring debut, Susan Elia MacNeal blends meticulous research on the era, psychological insight into Winston Churchill, and the creation of a riveting main character, Maggie Hope, into a spectacularly crafted novel.

Book Details

Title: Mr. Churchill’s Secretary: A Maggie Hope MysteryMr. Churchill's Secretary: A Maggie Hope Mystery by Susan Elia MacNeal
Author: Susan Elia MacNeal
Category: Fiction / Historical Mystery
My Rating: 3 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Real Learning by Elizabeth Foss
Two years ago: Update on Books I Was Looking Forward to Reading in 2013

The Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin

The Port Chicago 50The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil RightsThe Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin by Steve Sheinkin

Juvenile nonfiction is tough: I often find myself wanting more depth, and so perhaps giving lower ratings than is fair because a book skims the surface (as may be appropriate for the target audience).

I think this is probably one of those times – I’m not super enthusiastic about this book, mostly because I wanted *more* from it. It felt superficial, and like it’s the skeleton of an AMAZING book.

So, if you like juvenile nonfiction, or are looking for something to round out history for your children, this may be a great choice. It touches on World War II, military history, African American history, segregation (both in the military and in the US in general), civil rights, and life on the homefront. I’m fairly well-read in World War II history, but had never heard of this incident, and found myself getting enraged at the offensively bad treatment these sailors received.

Recommended, with the caveat that there isn’t much depth to it all and it left me wanting more. If you don’t mind it being aimed at middle grade readers, then it is interesting, if infuriating. And if the topic sounds appealing but you don’t want a juvenile title, there is Robert Allen’s The Port Chicago MutinyThe Port Chicago Mutiny by Robert Allen. I haven’t read it but am thinking about it, on the assumption that it will give me the depth I was missing in Sheinkin’s book.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
An astonishing civil rights story from Newbery Honor winner and National Book Award finalist Steve Sheinkin.

On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked the segregated Navy base at Port Chicago, California, killing more than 300 sailors who were at the docks, critically injuring off-duty men in their bunks, and shattering windows up to a mile away. On August 9th, 244 men refused to go back to work until unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. When the dust settled, fifty were charged with mutiny, facing decades in jail and even execution. This is a fascinating story of the prejudice that faced black men and women in America’s armed forces during World War II, and a nuanced look at those who gave their lives in service of a country where they lacked the most basic rights.

Book Details

Title: The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil RightsThe Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin
Author: Steve Sheinkin
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction / History
My Rating: 3 Stars

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Cover Love: Parnassus on Wheels

January 2016 Recap

January 2016 RecapYay for fresh starts! I do love the promise a new year holds, and love how motivating it is for me to look ahead at what I want to accomplish in the future.

So far 2016 has been pretty mild – and I am not complaining! I find it so tiring getting kids into snow clothes and long stretches when we’re cooped up inside because of extreme temperatures wears us all out. We’ve had days this month when the big kids were able to play outside for extended periods and that is wonderful for us all. :)

What January didn’t involve was me finishing a lot of books. I don’t know why exactly – I felt fairly frazzled much of the month with life stuff, and like I’m continually behind in EVERYTHING.

What I did read was generally really good though, so yay for that.

December 2015 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 7
Books Read For The Year: 7

Things That Happened
  • Homeschooling – G is flying through the last weeks of Core A, and I’ve pulled out Core B and have been getting it organized. Which (thankfully) doesn’t have to involve much, but I like doing more than I need to with it and really getting a good sense of what we’ll be reading, and when. Plus prepping an extensive list of possibly additional books to read, because of course I am. I’ll keep you posted on those books, and I’ll probably be posting soon about what our plans are for 2nd grade, because of course I’m working on that. 😉
  • I’ve also started thinking about H’s Kindergarten year, which we’ll start in August. She said she wants to learn to read, and I semi-started her in All About Reading 1, but she’s not really ready. So we do a tiny bit when she asks, but other than that I’m trying to hold off on her until after summer. I’m making my list of what I need to get for her before we start (not much – the beauty of what G did is almost all of it is reusable!)
  • I think we found a church. I’ve been hesitant to say that, but the kids have official name tags, and people know me and notice when we’ve missed a week due to illness. It’s not at all the sort of church where I initially expected to land, and I only tried it one week on a complete whim, but I do think it’s where we’re supposed to be. So, yeah. That’s a big thing.
  • We chatted about The Count of Monte Cristo – and I loved hearing what people had to say about it.
Best Things I Did or Saw
  • G playing basketball – it’s so cute. He’s actually pretty good on defense, but while at home or during practice he’s not bad at shooting the ball and making baskets, he has yet to make one in a game. I’m hoping he gets at least one before his season ends at the end of the month.
  • I went to a painting event at a friend’s house. I do not think I have *ever* used a canvas before, and my painting experience was limited to copy paper and watercolors. It was so much fun! I want to do it again, because I think with some practice I could actually make my painting come out like I want it too, which I was not completely able to do this time.
  • We started going to Financial Peace University. I had never thought that’d be something we’d do, because I thought it was for people dealing with mountains of credit card debt. That’s never been an issue for us (thankfully), so why would we go there? Well, we’re going through it because we’re not doing as well as I’d like at communicating about money and our goals and all of that sort of stuff. Also, I was hoping for a bit of a kick-in-the-pants at getting back to careful budgeting/record keeping like I did previously (and was so helpful).
What’s Cooking
  • Brussels Sprouts. We’ve been having them a couple of times a week and they are so so so good.
  • Cauliflower. I’ve made it as a side dish a couple of times and loved it. In the past I’ve always just roasted it (which is fabulous) but the last two times I treated it like a potato and boiled it, then drained & mashed it. Delicious! I keep thinking it’d make great leftovers but there has never been any leftover to try. :)
  • I’ve also been perfecting pan-seared steaks. I grew up with my mom always broiling steak (with the very occasionally steak on the grill) but never cooked in a skillet. They are so good that way – I love the sear I can get on them.
What I’m Anticipating in February
  • Book club meetings about two excellent books – The Boys in the Boat in my in-person book club (and I really need to hurry up and reread that book – because I’m facilitating the discussion!) and The Black Count in the Facebook group.
  • G’s basketball season will end – yes, it’s a quick one. He’s had a lot of fun with it, but I won’t miss the extra driving and schedule-coordinating it’s involved.
  • H (should be) testing for her orange belt. As I write this post, she’s got 3 black stripes on her belt, and she has to earn 4 to be allowed to test for the next belt. I’m pretty sure she’ll be able to earn that 4th stripe before testing on the 13th. I’ve got my fingers crossed that she does, and that she passes testing, because I do *not* like the schedule of classes she’s in as a yellow belt. Orange belt she’ll move up to the intermediate classes which are much more convenient for us. Plus, she’ll be in the same class as G for two belt levels, until he moves up to the advanced classes! That will be so wonderful.
  • Not to be left out, but I assume G will also be testing for his next belt – blue this time. That doesn’t mean anything as far as changing class times though. 😉
  • A coloring party! I’m finalizing the date (it’s been extra challenging because of basketball and other events) but a friend will be hosting a coloring party with me. I’m super excited about the excuse to get out of the house and meet with friends. Plus, look at these fun coloring books:
  • choose your coloring book

Books I Read

Asterisks mark ones I especially enjoyed. And yes, every one has an asterisk. :) It was a good month.

  1. * The Dead in their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley
  2. * The Lake House by Kate Morton
  3. * Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  4. * A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park
  5. * When My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park
  6. * The Story of Exploration by Anna Claybourne
  7. * The Black Count by Tom Reiss

Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Recent Readaloud: Dinosaur Trouble by Dick King-Smith
Two years ago: Book Review: The Arrivals by Melissa Marr
Three years ago: Book Review: My Life from Scratch by Gesine Bullock-Prado

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Come Along with Us To Korea! (our next theme for RTFEBC)

RTFEBC KoreaLooking ahead (so you’ve got time to reserve or buy the books), in March and April we’ll be reading about Korea for our family book club.

The picture book will be The Firekeeper’s SonThe Firekeeper's Son by Linda Sue Park, illustrated by Julie Downing. I’ll be back soon with a list of alternative picture book titles you can try, if you can’t easily locate this one.

The early elementary book (to be discussed in March) will be The Kite FightersThe Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park. This was a new-to-me book I was excited to read!

The middle grade/teen book (to be discussed in April) will be When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park. And while April’s books are aimed at somewhat older kids, this is a fantastic title that’s well worth reading even if you are an adult with no kids, or kids too young to appreciate it. It discusses Korea right before and during World War II, when Korea was occupied by Japan. Despite the topic, it’s handled gently, and may still be something you feel comfortable reading to upper elementary age children. If you want some specifics as you wonder about it’s appropriateness for your children, let me know – I reread it last month in preparation for this.

All of these picks for the Korea theme are by the same author – Linda Sue Park. She is an amazing author, to be sure, but that really wasn’t intentional. 😉

I hope you’ll join us over in the Facebook group, where this month we’ll be discussing Julie of the Wolves with Carrie of The Lion is a Bookworm as we finish our Arctic theme, and then get ready to move on to Korea along with that theme’s co-host, Moira of Hearth and Homefront.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Enchanted by Alethea Kontis
Two years ago: Book Review: Fit to Burst by Rachel Jankovic
Three years ago: Literary Confessions

New on the Stack in January 2016

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Nonfiction

The Black CountThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss

How did I get it: Bought a paperback copy from Amazon, and borrowed an electronic version from the library. Making it easy on myself to get it read!
Why did I get it: It’s my book club pick for February!

The Power of OneThe Power of One by Jenny Herman

How did I get it: Grabbed a Kindle copy when it was on special offer.
Why did I get it: I follow the author on social media and like her posts, so wanted to read her ebook.

Fiction

The ChosenThe ChosenThe Chosen by Chaim Potok by Chaim Potok

How did I get it: Bought a paperback copy from Amazon
Why did I get it: It’s my book club’s pick for March. Wanting to not cut things as close next month as I did this month!

Julie of the WolvesJulie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s this month’s book for RTFEBC.

A Single ShardA Single ShardA Single Shard by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.

The Kite FightersThe Kite FightersThe Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.

When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: New on the Stack in January 2015
Two years ago: 2013 Reads, Charts and Graphs Style

Seabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand

SeabiscuitSeabiscuit: An American LegendSeabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand by Laura Hillenbrand

The Expectations

Perhaps taking the award for the most-anticipated, but took-me-the-longest-to-get-through book of the decade.

I’d been saving Seabiscuit for a time when I wanted a guaranteed winner. It’s gotten such amazing reviews, and I loved Hillenbrand’s Unbroken, so of course I’m going to love this, right?

The Reality

It was a book club pick last year, but I ended up having to miss the meeting, so didn’t have that time pressure to get the book finished. And when I finally started reading it I discovered that my high expecations were not going to be reached.

It’s not that it’s a bad book. It has moments where it’s a fantastic book. But they’re interspersed with lots and lots of tedious detail about the specifics of so. many. races.

Can you tell I have no real interest in horse racing?

The Verdict

I loved the parts about the people involved. I loved the strategy behind some of the training methods. I did not love reading about the races themselves, but once I realized that I didn’t have to read every last word about the races, I enjoyed the book a lot more. Yes, I skimmed the race descriptions, and I’m not ashamed to admit it.

It’s a hard one to rate. The parts I liked were a solid 4, but the parts I didn’t were a 2 at best. I ended up going with a 3 figuring that balanced it out, but be warned that I thought it was an inconsistent one.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Seabiscuit was one of the most electrifying and popular attractions in sports history and the single biggest newsmaker in the world in 1938, receiving more coverage than FDR, Hitler, or Mussolini. But his success was a surprise to the racing establishment, which had written off the crooked-legged racehorse with the sad tail. Three men changed Seabiscuit’s fortunes:

Charles Howard was a onetime bicycle repairman who introduced the automobile to the western United States and became an overnight millionaire. When he needed a trainer for his new racehorses, he hired Tom Smith, a mysterious mustang breaker from the Colorado plains. Smith urged Howard to buy Seabiscuit for a bargain-basement price, then hired as his jockey Red Pollard, a failed boxer who was blind in one eye, half-crippled, and prone to quoting passages from Ralph Waldo Emerson. Over four years, these unlikely partners survived a phenomenal run of bad fortune, conspiracy, and severe injury to transform Seabiscuit from a neurotic, pathologically indolent also-ran into an American sports icon.

Author Laura Hillenbrand brilliantly re-creates a universal underdog story, one that proves life is a horse race.

Book Details

Title: Seabiscuit: An American LegendSeabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand
Author: Laura Hillenbrand
Category: Nonfiction / History
My Rating: 3 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: January 2015 Recap

Introducing February’s Book Club Selection: The Black Count

The Black CountThis month’s book for our Facebook book club is The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte CristoThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss, by Tom Reiss.

What It’s About

It’s the biography of Alexandre Dumas’ father, General Alex Dumas, who was partial inspiration for the book The Count of Monte CristoThe Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Read more about The Black Count at Goodreads.

Why Was This Title Selected

In the expectation that it’d be a nice complement to January’s book, and I wanted one biography for the year.

Anything Else to Know About It?

It won the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 2013, as well as the PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award.

It’s available in print, Kindle format, or Audible.

Discussion about the book starts today, but if you want to quick get the book and join in, we’ll continue it all month. If you’re debating whether or not it’s a book you want to read, I give it two thumbs up – it’s excellent. Even if you aren’t interested in joining in the on the discussion, it’s worth reading.

What’s Coming Up in March?

The ChosenLooking ahead to next month, we’ll be reading and discussing The ChosenThe Chosen by Chaim Potok by Chaim Potok. You’ve got plenty of time to find this book and get it read before our discussion on it begins March 1. This title is not available on Kindle, but it’s the only one for the year that isn’t available in print, on Kindle, and on Audible. See all the books we’ll be reading in 2016 here.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on Your Stack (volume 12)

Everything I Never Told YouKate (Mom’s Radius) is going to be reading Everything I Never Told YouEverything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng, which I borrowed from the library last year and then returned, unopened, after deciding that I wasn’t emotionally up for what I was afraid it might be.

I realize that I may be missing out on a fantastic book because of that decision. I may reconsider it in the future, or if someone tells me the book isn’t emotionally wrenching.


The Black CountJill (Days at Home) had quite the stack of new books, but I was most excited to see The Black CountThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss! I’m hoping that means she’s going to be joining us in the book club for the discussion on it next month. :)


The Book of Job JournalMelinda (This Boy Mom) has some *great* books listed – I love reading the Bible chronologically, and she’s got me curious about The Book of Job JournalThe Book of Job Journal: One Chapter a Day by Courtney Joseph she’ll be using for study in January. Add in her other books and it looks like a nice month for her.


The Lost City of ZTanya (The Other Side of the Road) lists some of the books that will be released as movies in 2016. Realistically, I’ll probably see none of them. But I have been meaning to read The Lost City of ZThe Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann for years. Seriously, it’s been on my Kindle for years. Why have I not gotten to it?


Red QueenJessica (Quirky Bookworm) gives her January reading plan, and she has the oh-so-intruguing Red QueenRed Queen by Victoria Aveyard on her list. I’m trying to hold strong, and not start that series until the final book is at least closer to being released. And with a current expected publication date of 2018 for book #4, I’m going to have to resist quite a bit longer.

But that cover! It’s calling to me! (Wait, I think I’ve said this before.) If I keep seeing this cover I may not be able to hold out on reading the book.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: The 13 Clocks by James Thurber
Two years ago: Book Review: Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie
Three years ago: Book Review: How to Eat a Small Country by Amy Finley

What the Kids are Reading (in January 2016)

That Is Not a Good IdeaThat Is Not a Good Idea!That Is Not a Good Idea! by Mo Willems by Mo Willems

They are *obsessed* with this one. Great repetition, fun illustrations, and a twist that makes them laugh every time.

Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You SeeBrown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr, illustrated by Eric Carle by Bill Martin Jr, illustrated by Eric Carle

Wonderfully repetitive – I keep thinking H is going to get tired of reciting it to herself, but so far she hasn’t.

Polar Bear Polar Bear What Do You HearPolar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? by Bill Martin, Jr. illustrated by Eric Carle by Bill Martin Jr, illustrated by Eric Carle

Just like the Brown Bear book, only with a polar bear and sounds. H loves this one too, and reads both of them to her sister (and how adorable is that?).

That's Not My HedgehogThat’s Not My Hedgehog by Fiona Watt, illustrated by Rachel Wells

We already owned other titles in the “That’s Not My…” series, but M got this one for Christmas and it quickly became her favorite. It’s all about the scratchy texture on the last page – she loves it! Plus, you know, finding the little mouse on each page is super fun as well.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Parnassus on Wheels by Christopher Morley
Two years ago: Book Review: Coming Clean by Kimberly Rae Miller
Three years ago: Getting Geeky: 2012 Reads, Charts & Graphs Style