New on the Stack in November 2016

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Nonfiction

animal-vegetable-miracleAnimal Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Book club’s January pick

im-just-here-for-the-foodI’m Just Here for the Food by Alton Brown

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I love Alton Brown.

no-sweatNo Sweat: How the Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You a Lifetime of Fitness by Michelle Segar

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how this ended up on my library holds list, but I got an email saying it was available for me.

Fiction

the-anatomists-wifeThe Anatomist’s Wife by Anna Lee Huber

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I think it was an ad on my own blog, and the title and cover sounded intriguing. 🙂

heartlessHeartless by Marissa Meyer

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Love Meyer’s other books

anne-of-green-gablesAnne Of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

How did I get it: Bought it from Audible
Why did I get it: It’s Rachel McAdams reading Anne of Green Gables, and I got it for under $3.(and if you haven’t heard how to get that deal, buy the kindle version for under $1. Then get the Audible for $1.99. Rejoice at your great fortune.)

Ready Player OneReady Player One by Ernest Cline

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Book club’s pick for January.

broken-homesBroken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

mortal-artsMortal Arts by Anna Lee Huber

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

the-brutal-tellingThe Brutal Telling by Louise Penny

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

poldarkPoldark by Winston Graham

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: We’re considering this for book club later this year. I need to preread it and see what I think before we select it.

foxglove-summerFoxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

a-grave-matterA Grave Matter by Anna Lee Huber

How did I get it Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

the-dark-unwindingThe Dark Unwinding by Sharon Cameron

How did I get it: Borrowed the audio version electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember why this was on my radar.

stalking-jack-the-ripperStalking Jack the Ripper by by Kerri Maniscalco

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember why this was on my radar.

bury-your-deadBury Your Dead by Louise Penny

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

forest-bornForest Born by Shannon Hale

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

the-zoo-at-the-edge-of-the-worldThe Zoo at the Edge of the World by Eric Kahn Gale

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember why it was on my list. I wish I did, because I would re-evaluate any others I might have added to my TBR from that source, as I didn’t really care for this book. At least it was a kids’ book so it was quick!

a-trick-of-the-lightA Trick of the Light by Louise Penny

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

the-hangmanThe Hangman by Louise Penny

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s an Armand Gamache novella!

first-among-sequelsFirst Among Sequels by Jasper Fforde

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I haven’t read any in the Thursday Next in ages.

changelessChangeless by Gail Carriger

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Giving this series another shot.

night-of-a-thousand-starsNight of a Thousand Stars by Deanna Rayburn

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Deanna Rayburn + an interesting setting = worth a try.

walk-into-silenceWalk Into Silence by Susan McBride

How did I get it: Kindle First freebie for November.
Why did I get it: Was the most interesting sounding one of the options.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or Instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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November 2016 Recap

November RecapNovember was a good month for reading, but not so much for blogging. I was sick, M was sick – it all added up to time on the couch resting and/or snuggling a sick baby.

So thankful it wasn’t anything serious for us (just nasty colds that lingered), and for my Kindle app on my phone which let me get through a bunch of books!

November 2016 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 15
Books Read For The Year: 91

Things That Happened
  • Thanksgiving and a pie extravaganza.
  • In the Facebook book club we discussed David and Goliath.
  • G began basketball.
  • H participated in a taekwondo tournament. She’s the smallest one in her belt class, and sended up in a group with all boys. Watching her take on those bigger boys was fun. Love how fearless she is!
  • I made a bit of a change to H’s Kindergarten curriculum. What I was trying to do wasn’t working that well, and I was dreading it. Two weeks in to the slight revamp and things are going well. Once I give it a little more time to know if it’ll continue to work well, I’ll share what changes I made.
  • G continues to chug along with his homeschool curriculum. He’s almost done with week 29, so it’s time for me to start seriously thinking about getting the next stuff ready to go. Week 36 will be here before I know it! Although a break for Christmas will slwo things down a bit. 🙂
What’s Cooking
  • Soup season is back! Hooray! Now if only my kids would eat soup instead of acting like I’m trying to poison them when I serve it.
  • I made 8 pies for Thanksgiving and the peanut butter, chocolate chip cookie, and apple were SO GOOD. The blueberry was not good; I bought a different brand of filling and it was gross. And the pumpkin was weird; the filling ended up being really runny and didn’t taste right.
What I’m Anticipating in December
  • Book club –The Uncommon Reader for my in-person book club and The Hobbit in the Facebook group.
  • Christmas. I am not prepared for it.
  • A very overdue, twice-postponed coloring party! It’s happening tonight, barring catastrophe or family emergencies or similar issues.
  • Belt testing. G is going for senior red and H for senior purple.
Books I Read
  1. A Rule Against Murder
  2. The Case of the Left-Handed Lady
  3. Whispers Under Ground
  4. Garden Spells
  5. Last of the Breed
  6. The Anatomist’s Wife
  7. Sleep Smarter
  8. The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets
  9. Broken Homes
  10. Mortal Arts
  11. The Brutal Telling
  12. Foxglove Summer
  13. A Grave Matter
  14. The Zoo at the Edge of the World
  15. Bury Your Dead

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on Your Stack (volume 21)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:

starflightOnce again I’m going to wait on Kate (Opinionated Book Lover) (and how much do I love that blog name??) to decide if I’m going to read one of her books. Starflight is intriguing to this inexperienced science fiction reader, but it sounds like there may be a romance angle in it. I’ll wait for Kate to post her review before I decide if I’ll read this one.


one-to-fiveI do love trying new cookbooks, and Stacie (Sincerely Stacie) highlighted one where the concept sounds *very* appealing. One to Five takes one recipe and turns it into five dishes. I could handle that.


waves-of-mercyJill (Days at Home) let me know that Lynn Austen has a new book out – Waves of Mercy. I haven’t read all of Austen’s works, but what I have read of hers I’ve really enjoyed. I’m adding this to my tbr list for when I’m in the mood for that setting.


i-let-you-goTanya (The Other Side of the Road) highlights I Let You Go, and while part of me really wants to read it, the other part says that I need to stay far away from it. I think perhaps I’m better off skipping it, at least until my kids are all much older.


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Two years ago: New on My Bookcase (vol. 26)
Three years ago: Reading Challenge Progress: December

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

David and Goliath (and a linkup)

David and GoliathDavid and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling GiantsDavid and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants by Malcolm Gladwell by Malcolm Gladwell

While I expected to really enjoy Gladwell’s book, I found it to be a bit of a let-down. Outliers, Blink, and The Tipping Point were more compelling books, and all felt fresher. It may simply be that I’ve gotten so used to Gladwell’s style that this book was doomed to disappoint, but I felt like he was reaching more with some of his examples.

That said, I did really enjoy some of the sections. The chapter on choosing college was very interesting, and I’ve already had a side chat with someone about it. The dyslexia chapter was fascinating, and I found myself completely amazed at some of the individuals highlighted.

Fortunately, Gladwell’s books are easy to read, so I don’t feel like I ended up spending a lot of reading time on something I ultimately didn’t like enough to justify it. I’d recommend that if it sounds interesting, you give it a try but don’t hesitate to skip chapters that don’t appeal to you.


Looking ahead at next month, we’ll start our discussion of The Hobbit on December 5th.


If you’ve written a post about David and Goliath, you’re welcome to add it to the linkup below.

Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share a post about the book. Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to The Deliberate Reader – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open for two weeks.

4. Please visit the person’s blog who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs or comments from your linked post.

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Binge Reading: All the Series Fiction

While I was sick and then slowly recovering over the past two weeks, I haven’t been doing much in the way of blogging (obviously), but barring the very worst days of sickness, I have been reading.

the-brutal-tellingAnd reading, and reading. I’ve been on a series fiction binge and loving it.

I’ve read #5 in the Chief Inspector Gamache series by Louise Penny (The Brutal Telling), #3 and #4 in the Peter Grant series by Ben Aaronovitch (Whispers Underground and Broken Homes), #2 and #3 in the Enola Holmes series by Nancy Springer (The Case of the Left-Handed Lady and The Case of the Bizarre Bouquets) , #1 and #2 in the Lady Darby series by Anna Lee Huber (The Anatomist’s Wife and Mortal Arts).

a-grave-matterSo as to be not 100% series fiction I also read Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen, Last of the Breed by Louis L’Amour, and Sleep Smarter by Shawn Stevenson.

Waiting for me on my Kindle are the next in the Gamache, Grant, and Darby series. Plus I really should get moving on my book club books for next month. The Hobbit is waiting for me. 😉

And all the while I’m trying desperately to keep myself from reading #3 in the Cormoran Strike series, because there’s still no publication date listed for #4.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

2017 Book Club Selections

the-deliberate-reader-2017-book-club-selections

It’s only November, but it’s time to look ahead to next year’s book club! Like this year, we’ll be discussing each month’s book in our closed Facebook group. You’re welcome to join us for one month or all twelve.


January

animal-vegetable-miracleAnimal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver

Why did I select it? I wanted a discussable nonfiction title, and this one seemed like a fun way to start the year. Plus it’s been on my to be read stack for years.

What’s it about? Following a move from Arizona to Appalachia, Kingsolver spends a year focusing on a locally-produced diet and the provenance of everything her family eats.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

February

molokaiMoloka’i by Alan Brennert

Why did I select it? Fantastic reviews, and it’s an unusual setting. Last year’s historical fiction book took us to Iceland, so this year we’ll warm up in Hawaii.

What’s it about? A seven-year-old Hawaiian girl who contracts leprosy and is quarantined on the island of Moloka’i during the 1890s.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads
And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.

March

emmaEmma by Jane Austen

Why did I select it? It’s a classic, and I’ve never read it. I wanted one classic novel for the year, and wanted it to be one that I wouldn’t have to force myself to read. I think Austen should work for that. 🙂

What’s it about? As daughter of the richest, most important man in the small provincial village of Highbury, Emma Woodhouse is firmly convinced that it is her right–perhaps even her “duty”–To arrange the lives of others.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first. You can also listen for free from Librivox.


April

dark-matterDark Matter by Blake Crouch

Why did I select it? Science fiction/thriller to add some variety to the year. I’ve also tried to mostly pick books that have been out for a year or two (to make it easier to find them at the library), but thought it would be fun to have one newer one on the list. This is that one, as it just released this year.

What’s it about? An ordinary man is kidnapped, knocked unconscious–and awakens in a world inexplicably different from the reality he thought he knew.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

May

hannah-coulterHannah Coulter by Wendell Berry

Why did I select it? Our literary fiction pick for the year, and because I’ve been wanting to get to one of Berry’s books.

What’s it about? An elderly farmwife looks back on her life and world.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


June

UprootedUprooted by Naomi Novik

Why did I select it? The year’s fantasy option, chosen because Jessica raved over it. It was also surprisingly difficult to find a stand-alone fantasy novel – so many of the ones I was finding were series reads (or at least trilogies), and I didn’t want to choose one that wouldn’t be complete in one book.

What’s it about? Agnieszka’s native village of Dvernik is menaced by something in the surrounding woods, protected only by the local sorcerer. Every decade he chooses a village girl to serve him. Agnieszka is about to find out what happens to those girls during their years of service.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


July

true-gritTrue Grit by Charles Portis

Why did I select it? I’ve never read a western, so I thought it’d be fun to try one. This one appears on a lot of “best of” lists, and if we’re only going to read one, I want it to be a good one.

What’s it about? Fourteen-year-old Mattie Ross recounts the time when she sought retribution for her father’s murder.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


August

the-diamond-ageThe Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson

Why did I select it? The year needed a science fiction selection, and Stephenson’s novel was highly recommended to introduce the genre to non-science fiction readers.

What’s it about? A young girl named Nell grows up in a future world in which nanotechnology affects all aspects of life.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


September

plainsongPlainsong by Kent Haruf

Why did I select it? Contemporary fiction that turned up on a lot of recommended reading lists, as well as some lists specifically geared towards book clubs.

What’s it about? The interwoven lives of a community in Colorado.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


October

funny-in-farsiFunny in Farsi by Firoozeh Dumas

Why did I select it? I wanted one memoir for the year, about someone not American or English, and not have it be completely gut-wrenching in subject matter. This ended up being a last-minute substitution when my original pick turned out to be a novel, based on true events.

What’s it about? Describes struggles with culture shock after Firoozeh’s family moved from Iran to America when she was 7 years old

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


November

ordinary-graceOrdinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Why did I select it? The year’s mystery selection. I wanted either a stand-alone or the first in a series. This is a stand-alone, although Kreuger does have a series as well.

What’s it about? Looking back at a tragic event that occurred during his thirteenth year, Frank Drum explores how a complicated web of secrets, adultery, and betrayal shattered his Methodist family and their small 1961 Minnesota community.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.


December

Swear on This LifeSwear on This Life by Renee Carlino

Why did I select it? This was the hardest category for me to select – light(ish) fiction. I didn’t want complete fluff, but did want an easy to read pick (filling the role Big Little Lies did in 2016). I’m hoping this is a fun choice to wrap up the year.

What’s it about? A struggling writer must come to grips with her past, present, and future after she discovers that she’s the inspiration for a pseudonymously published bestselling novel.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

2017-the-deliberate-reader-book-club-choices

Homeschooling Update: Finished with Ancient Greece

ancient-greece-books-for-kids

We’ve more or less finished with Ancient Greece and will be getting into Ancient Rome. And then that is pretty much the end of B for us and we’ll move onto C. Crazy! Although that makes it sound like we’re closer than we are – there’s still 9 weeks of the schedule ahead of us.

It’s been a really nice stretch, as he’s liked Greece, and I like Ancient Greece much more than Ancient Egypt.

What Would I Recommend?

blast-back-ancient-greeceIf you’re looking to do ancient Greece on your own, I’d recommend Blast Back! Ancient Greece – it was really well done, and covered a good amount for lower elementary, without being overkill. The Greek Myths book is also quite nice if you want to cover them, and it was never too detailed to make it something I didn’t want to share with my young kids.

If you have a child who likes to color, I’d get one of the inexpensive Dover coloring books. I skipped this because G has never liked coloring very much, but I’m almost certainly going to get one when H studies this. Dover options include Life in Ancient Greece, Greek Gods and Goddesses, Sparta!, and Greek and Roman Fashion.

sticker-dressing-greek-mythsIf you’ve got a sticker fan in your house, Sticker Dressing Greek Myths is fun. My son loves using these books, so that’s what he gets in lieu of a coloring book.

For more general history not limited to Ancient Greece, I’m using and enjoying A Child’s History of the World, The Usborne Book of World History (great for visuals), and Story of the World Volume 1 & the accompanying activity book. It’s more than is needed, but I’m trying to stretch things out for us.

Have Older Students?

usborne-illustrated-stories-from-the-greek-mythsIf you’re looking to cover Ancient Greece with an older child (say, 10 and up), Usborne has an excellent title that would work well. The Greeks was overkill for my son right now, but if we need more I’ll use it for his next pass through this era. They also have several options for Greek Myths books more appropriate for older readers, and a general history encyclopedia that I love.

Still Want More?

adventures-in-ancient-greeceIf you’re also looking to stretch things out, I also used Greek News, Adventures in Ancient Greece and Top 10 Worst Things about Ancient Greece. I’d go for the first two if you want more books, but none of them are essential if you’ve read Blast Back! Adventures in Ancient Greece does add a fictional component to the topic, if you’re looking for that. Another fiction option is Hour of the Olympics, from the Magic Tree House series. My son read that to himself – love that easy reading level! He also read the nonfiction companion book, Ancient Greece and the Olympics.


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Two years ago: Book Review: Ghost Ship by Brian Hicks
Three years ago: How to Find More Time to Read: Part 1

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

The SilkwormThe Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

The second book in the Cormoran Strike series, and while I liked the first book well enough, I LOVED this one. I stayed up till 2 AM reading it, when I finally and had to force myself. If I hadn’t known my kids were going to wake up and expect food and attention the next day I’d have continued.)

I wanted to immediately get the third book and find out what happened next. The only reason I have paused in reading the series is the knowledge that book four isn’t released yet. A publishing date hasn’t even been set (sob!) and after hearing that book three ends on a cliffhanger I’m trying to minimize my wait time.

If you haven’t read the series, I do think you should start with the first (even if I didn’t like it as much). That allows you to meet the characters and I think the more time with Robin the better.

Despite my love for this book I have some cautions: if you’re squeamish, or opposed to language or other graphic content you’ll want to skip it. I kind of hate having to tell anyone to pass on it, as it’s so good, but have to admit that it’s not for everyone. Know your own comfort level of what you want to read.

I’m not much of a TV person, but the BBC is developing the three books currently out in the series into a show and I am thrilled to hear it. The actors have been chosen for the lead roles: Tom Burke will play Cormoran Strike, and Holliday Grainger will play Robin Ellacott.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Nook | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Private investigator Cormoran Strike returns in a new mystery from Robert Galbraith, author of the number-one international best seller The Cuckoo’s Calling.

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days – as he has done before – and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine’s disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives – meaning that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before…


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Four years ago: Book Review: Dinner, a Love Story

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Recent DNFs: Where I Concede That Some Books are Not Working for Me

In my never-ending quest to make the best use of my reading time, I’m trying really hard not to continue reading books I’m not enjoying (unless I have some larger reason to finish them, such as for book club).

The Rosie ProjectI was reading The Rosie Project as a possible book club selection, but didn’t enjoy it. I felt like I knew exactly where the plot was going to go, and none of the characters appealed to me enough to continue. I’d heard nothing but great things about it, so I was surprised to not like it. Maybe it was just the wrong time for me and I should give it another try later?

What the Bible Really Tells UsI gained so much from Wray’s book Surviving the Death of an Adult Sibling, so wanted to try additional works by her (and expected to enjoy them). Instead I gave up on What the Bible Really Tells Us about a third of the way through – I was so bored by it and reading it felt like a school assignment. I maybe should have skim-read it but it was due back at the library so I didn’t even manage that much of the final chapters.

AirbornAirborn was really slow to get going and I could never get into the world he’d created. Even when the action began I was bored by it and didn’t care about what happened to any of the characters. Once things started getting super weird I decided to save my reading time and move onto something else.

The Secret History of the Pink CarnationI tried again and again to get into The Secret History of the Pink Carnation, because Jessica has said such good things about the series. Finally after realizing I was reading anything else instead of this one I conceded that for whatever reason it wasn’t compelling me to read more of it. This is another where I wonder if it was a case of bad timing, and maybe I should give it another try. I want to like it because it’s a nice long series, and that’s always fun to have lots of books to look forward to.

October 2016 Recap

October RecapOctober was a lovely month – I got a lot of reading in (even with about a week in the middle where I read very little), my mother-in-law came for a visit (yay!), and I had events with friends three times. That fact is very much related to the visit. 😉

So yes, it was a lovely month.

October 2016 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 11
Books Read For The Year: 76

Things That Happened
  • Halloween
  • In the Facebook book club we discussed The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
  • Belt testing passed successfully by both kids
  • Soccer ended.
  • Popcorn sales. Lots of popcorn sales. 😉
Best Things I Did or Saw
  • We had our first field trip of the year: we rode the train from Connersville to Metamora, got to walk around the town a bit, and then ride the train back. It was fun, but I was exhausted by the end of it!
  • We used a stencil to carve pumpkins for the first time, and I am a big fan.
What’s Cooking
  • Not much. I feel like I was scrounging all month with meal ideas.
What I’m Anticipating in November
  • Book club – The Book Thief for my in-person book club and David and Goliath in the Facebook group.
  • Thanksgiving. Yummm.
  • G has two Cub Scout outings – a hike in a nearby State Park, and going to the Pacers game.
  • G also has basketball starting – I thought it started in January but apparently, it’s November.
  • H (matybe?) has a taekwondo tournament. G will miss it because of basketball opening day.
Books I Read
  1. Thrice the Brinded Cat Hath Mewed by Alan Bradley
  2. The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle by Arthur Conan Doyle
  3. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
  4. Moon over Soho by Ben Aaronovitch
  5. Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes
  6. David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell
  7. The Fairy-Tale Detectives:The Sisters Grimm by Michael Buckley
  8. Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes
  9. The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
  10. The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths
  11. The Case of the Missing Marquess by Nancy Springer

Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Two years ago: October 2014 Recap
Three years ago: New on My Bookcase (vol. 10)

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!