The Grand Tour (Kate and Cecelia #2)

The Grand TourThe Grand Tour: or the Purloined Coronation Regalia (The Cecelia and Kate Novels, 2)The Grand Tour: or the Purloined Coronation Regalia (The Cecelia and Kate Novels, 2) by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer

Another re-read, to refresh my memory before reading the final book in the series. When I read it the first time, I loved it almost as much as book one, Sorcery and Cecelia. This time, I felt it didn’t measure up quite as strongly next to the series introduction.

Much of that may simply have been timing – I read them back to back, and what seemed so fresh and inventive in book one was less so the second time around. Perhaps I’ve also become a more discerning reader though, and could recognize some of the structural limitations of the format. In book one the main characters are separated, and they tell the story through letters to each other. In this book, they’re journeying together, and the narrative is related through journal entries and a written testimony after the fact. It doesn’t work quite as well as the back-and-forth letters.

However, if you liked book one, I do think it’s fun to continue their story, and I’m still looking forward to reading the third book. I wouldn’t recommend this book to anyone who hasn’t read the first, which I highly recommend to fantasy fans.

Publisher’s Description:
Kate and Cecy and their new husbands, Thomas and James, are off on a Grand Tour. Their plans? To leisurely travel about the Continent, take in a few antiquities, and–of course–purchase fabulous Parisian wardrobes.

But once they arrive in France, mysterious things start to happen. Cecy receives a package containing a lost coronation treasure, Thomas’s valet is assaulted, and Kate loses a glove. Soon it becomes clear that they have stumbled upon a dastardly, magical plot to take over Europe.

Now the four newlyweds must embark on a daring chase to thwart the evil conspiracy. And there’s no telling the trouble they’ll get into along the way. For when you mix Kate and Cecy and magic, you never know what’s going to happen next!

Book Details

Title: The Grand Tour: or the Purloined Coronation Regalia (The Cecelia and Kate Novels, 2)The Grand Tour: or the Purloined Coronation Regalia (The Cecelia and Kate Novels, 2) by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer
Author: Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer
Category: Fiction / Fantasy
My Rating: 3.5 Stars

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Velma Still Cooks in Leeway

Velma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in Leeway by Vinita Hampton Wright by Vinita Hampton Wright

The title alone would never have compelled me to grab this book. Neither would the description (I’m such a genre fiction fan that general fiction rarely calls my name). What did convince me to give the book a try was that it was a popular pick for my book club, before I was attending it. I wanted to see what I’d missed!

This was an unexpectedly delightful book – I loved Velma as a character, and loved her distinctive voice. The story-telling was so strong, and even though I guessed one of the events that occurred late in the book (no more details for fear of spoilers), it didn’t diminish my enjoyment of the book. And it didn’t prevent me from crying, but maybe that was just pregnancy hormones. (probably not though)

Recommended, and now I’m looking forward to trying another book by the author. This one was such a treat.

Publisher’s Description:
As the town’s chief cook and part-time janitor for Jerusalem Baptist church, Velma Brendle has never done anything more outstanding than putting on a good meal at Velma’s Place, the one restaurant in Leeway, Kansas, but she takes good care of her customers, neighbors, and friends. However, in the midst of these two jobs, Velma’s husband stops talking, Cousin Albert comes to live with her, and she finds herself dealing with the town’s problems. As memories of past troubles plague her, she grows weary from even the tasks she loves the most. Old Sunday School lessons take on new meanings, and new problems illuminate trials Velma thought were long over. In sudden leaps of faith and moments of tragedy, Velma and all those she loves journey toward facing their sins and finding forgiveness.

Book Details

Title: Velma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in Leeway by Vinita Hampton Wright
Author: Vinita Hampton Wright
Category: Fiction
My Rating: 4.5 Stars

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Recent Nonfiction Reads: Twitterature-Style

recent nonfiction reads, twitterature-style

The Southern VegetarianThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern TableThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern Table by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence

Loved this cookbook – there were tons of recipes that tempted me (unfortunately a few of the ones that were most tempting are maybe a little more work than I’ll want to put into a weeknight dish). A huge bonus to the book is that almost every recipe includes a picture – the only ones I noticed that didn’t were the “basics” in the final chapter – things like pizza dough and a dry rub, etc.

Teach a Child to Read with Children's BooksTeach a Child to Read With Children’s Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading SuccessTeach a Child to Read With Children's Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading Success by Mark B. Thogmartin by Mark B. Thogmartin

I wish I’d seen the updated version, but overall I found this one to be too much of what I already knew. If you’re new to the educational philosophy behind reading to children and methods of reading instruction, it’s a good resource. I learned to read this way, so the “yes this works!” details weren’t necessary for me, nor the specifics on why a more balanced approach vs. phonics-only or whole-language-only methods is preferable.

All Through the Day, All Through the YearAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and CelebrationsAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and Celebrations by David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutsonby David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutson

Wanted a more general look at celebrating the liturgical calendar, but this was mostly his family’s approach to it. Which … isn’t bad, just not as overall helpful as I wanted. And it might be shallow, but the format of the book was unwieldy and fairly obnoxious to hold and read.

The Internet is a PlaygroundThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online GeniusThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online Genius by David Thorne by David Thorne
While some of the chapters had me laughing almost hysterically, overall it was unevenly entertaining. I returned it to the library without finishing it, in part because wading through it for the parts I’d find amusing wasn’t worth the reading time.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

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Read This, Not That: Culinary School Accounts

Beaten, Seared, and SaucedThe Making of a ChefThe Sharper Your Knife The Less You Cry

So, you’re interested in culinary school? Want to experience it vicariously, or just enjoy the accounts of what happens there?

There are plenty of books on the topic available: Under the TableUnder the Table: Saucy Tales from Culinary School by Katherine Darling, White Jacket RequiredWhite Jacket Required: A Culinary Coming-of-Age Story by Jenna Weber, and my most recent read: Beaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of AmericaBeaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of America by Jonathan Dixon.

Instead of those though, I’d suggest you read Michael Ruhlman’s book The Making of a Chef, if you want a more general look at the Culinary Institute of America, or read Kathleen Flinn’s memoir The Sharper Your Knife The Less You Cry, about her experiences at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris. I’ve shared about both Ruhlman’s and Flinn’s books before, but they’re so much stronger and more enjoyable than the other ones I’ve read that I can’t allow that to stop me from highlighting them again.

In Beaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of AmericaBeaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of America by Jonathan Dixon author Jonathan Dixon came across more that he didn’t want to grow up and figure out what he wanted to do with his life, and cooking school was a way to delay that for a little longer. He’s 38 though, and ends up relying on his girlfriend to pay most of their bills as all of his savings have gone towards tuition.

The best parts of Dixon’s book are the descriptions of his classes, but it’s not enough to recommend this book over the other stronger options that are available. I think if Dixon had explored what it was like to be significantly older than his classmates a bit more, and the ramifications of that on a future culinary career, it would have made for a stronger book. As it was though, that was a wasted opportunity to make his book shine among all the other accounts that have been published.

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The Big Reveal

The Big Reveal It's a GirlI mentioned in my monthly recap post last week that we were anticipating an upcoming ultrasound appointment that would tell us whether or not the baby was growing like it should, and if there were any issues that could be seen.

And whether we’d be adding another boy or girl to the family. :)

The kids came along on this appointment, and this was the first time we’d told them that they’d be getting a new sibling. Originally I’d wanted to wait until we’d passed the biggest danger points in a pregnancy, and by then I decided that I wanted to wait until we could tell them if they’d be getting a brother or sister.

And the ultrasound says … GIRL!

I’m so glad we did it that way – it was so much easier telling them that, then just saying that we’d be adding a baby to the family. As it is, they are SUPER excited (wonder if that’ll last, and if so, at what point will the thrill wear off – the first time I have to take care of the baby instead of doing something with them?)

They’ve been happily telling everyone (and I do mean EVERYONE) that they’re getting a baby sister. G especially likes to confuse people by saying “TWO sisters!” and I have to clarify that no, just one baby will be arriving. He means he’s going to now have two sisters. H sometimes adds to that confusion by saying that she’s getting a baby sister and G is getting a baby sister, and again I have to clarify that they’re getting one baby sister to share.

It’s all starting to get very real to me, and I alternate between feeling slight bits of panic at how I’m going to manage three, and what do I need/want to get done before she arrives, and agreeing with G, who after finding out when he’d meet his new sister sadly exclaimed “but August is a long time away!”

Recent Readaloud: Mercy Watson to the Rescue

Mercy Watson to the RescueMercy Watson to the RescueMercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen

Last month I wrote about a recent attempt at reading chapter books to my children, and their disinterest in the one I picked. In the comments to that post, I got two suggestions for other books to try, and I quickly put those books on hold at the library.

So, to Alison who recommended Mercy Watson? Thank you! What a fun story, and it kept their attention so well. Perhaps best of all, it’s opened up a slew of additonal books to read – there are six Mercy Watson titles published, and it’s reminded me to look at what else Kate DiCamillo has published.

My verdict:
Cute story, and great illustrations. Very readable!

The kids’ verdict:
They LOVED it. I thought we’d just read a few chapters at a time, but they demanded I continue each time I asked if they wanted me to stop. We finished the whole thing in one sitting, and H especially asks for it again regularly.

Publisher’s Description:
To Mr. and Mrs. Watson, Mercy is not just a pig — she’s a porcine wonder. And to the good-natured Mercy, the Watsons are an excellent source of buttered toast, not to mention that buttery-toasty feeling she gets when she snuggles into bed with them. This is not, however, so good for the Watsons’ bed. BOOM! CRACK!

Book Details

Title: Mercy Watson to the RescueMercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen
Author: by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen
Category: Children’s Fiction

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Fortune’s Pawn (Book 1, Paradox Series)

œF$¿Æ‘$8Òò¤»däå¸R8BIFortune’s PawnFortune's Pawn (Paradox Book 1) by Rachel Bach by Rachel Bach

My love for fantasy has been mentioned on the site before, along with my general disinterest in science fiction. What finally persuaded me to give a sci-fi series a try again? Having it be written by the author of a fantasy series I really enjoyed, of course. Rachel Bach is the science fiction pen name of Rachel Aaron, the fantasy author.

If all science fiction were as enjoyable for this one, I’d be a firm convert to the genre. I loved the main character, I liked the plot, and it avoided the annoyances that have turned me off from the genre in the past. Specifically, I appreciated that the book didn’t emphasize the physical attributes of every female character introduced. And while there was fighting, that didn’t feel like the only thing that ever happened. Finally, the technology wasn’t described in endless, tedious detail. I don’t care how these things are supposed to be able to happen – I don’t even care if some of the things described are impossible by the laws of physics. :)

There are two more books in the series, and I’m hoping I like them as much as the first. I’ve got book #2 waiting for me on my Kindle, and book #3 comes out later this month. Love that I can finish the series without having to wait and wait and wait for them all to be published!

Publisher’s Description:
Devi Morris isn’t your average mercenary. She has plans. Big ones. And a ton of ambition. It’s a combination that’s going to get her killed one day – but not just yet.
That is, until she just gets a job on a tiny trade ship with a nasty reputation for surprises. The Glorious Fool isn’t misnamed: it likes to get into trouble, so much so that one year of security work under its captain is equal to five years everywhere else. With odds like that, Devi knows she’s found the perfect way to get the jump on the next part of her Plan. But the Fool doesn’t give up its secrets without a fight, and one year on this ship might be more than even Devi can handle.

If Sigouney Weaver in Alien met Starbuck in Battlestar Galactica, you’d get Deviana Morris — a hot new mercenary earning her stripes to join an elite fighting force. Until one alien bite throws her whole future into jeopardy.(

Book Details

Title: Fortune’s PawnFortune's Pawn (Paradox Book 1) by Rachel Bach
Author: Rachel Bach
Category: Fiction / Science Fiction
My Rating: 4 Stars

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Four Kitchens

Four KitchensFour Kitchens: My Life Behind the Burner in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv, and ParisFour Kitchens: My Life Behind the Burner in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv, and Paris by Lauren Shockey by Lauren Shockey

I liked the premise of this book – the author takes a year after culinary school to be a stagier (a non-paid intern) at four restaurants around the world. Unfortunately, the book itself was a little bit disappointing. It suffers a bit in comparison with some of the other terrific food-related nonfiction I’ve read.

Strengths of the book include the depictions of the differences between the four kitchens – the ultra-technique-focused wd-50 in New York, the emphasis on flavors in Hanoi, the laid-back atmosphere in Tel Aviv, and the unfriendly environment in Paris. The perspective she brought to the challenges faced by any chefs in balancing restaurant life with a family (especially as a woman) were appreciated, but she came across as naive at times in her dismay at how rare it was to see the owner working in the kitchen and actually cooking. She also does an excellent job at depicting the tediousness of much of restaurant work – the hours involved at prepping the components of a dish, and the decidedly non-glamorous aspect of all the backstage tasks.

What I didn’t always enjoy was the overall tone of the book – she comes across as very self-congratulatory, especially when comparing herself to the other stagiers (especially that poor guy at wd-50). I also wanted a more developed conclusion – yes, the book focuses on her experiences in those four kitchens, but the course her career takes after that year is something that I’d have liked more details on, even in a brief epilogue. Maybe she’s setting it up for another memoir, like Ruth Reichl.

Publisher’s Description:
At the French Culinary Institute, Lauren Shockey learned to salt food properly, cook fearlessly over high heat, and knock back beers like a pro. But she also discovered that her real culinary education wouldn’t begin until she actually worked in a restaurant. After a somewhat disappointing apprenticeship in the French provinces, Shockey hatched a plan for her dream year: to apprentice in four high-end restaurants around the world. She started in her hometown of New York City under the famed chef Wylie Dufresne at the molecular gastronomy hotspot wd-50, then traveled to Vietnam, Israel, and back to France. From the ribald kitchen humor to fiery-tempered workers to tasks ranging from the mundane (mincing cases of shallots) to the extraordinary (cooking seafood on the line), Shockey shows us what really happens behind the scenes in haute cuisine, and includes original recipes integrating the techniques and flavors she learned along the way. With the dramatic backdrop of restaurant life, readers will be delighted by the adventures of a bright and restless young woman looking for her place in the world.

Book Details

Title: Four Kitchens: My Life Behind the Burner in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv, and ParisFour Kitchens: My Life Behind the Burner in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv, and Paris by Lauren Shockey
Author: Lauren Shockey
Category: Nonfiction / Memoir
My Rating: 3 Stars

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How I Choose What To Read

I found this buried in my drafts, and I’m not sure why I never published it. So, consider this a very, very belated response to Elizabeth’s post. Which I obviously really enjoyed, so much so that I wrote a post in reply.

How do YOU decide what to read?

On a daily basis, when it comes to which book I pull off my bookshelf / start on my Kindle, I try to keep a good balance between what I’m reading – fiction and nonfiction, and types of each. So if I’ve just finished a memoir, I’ll look for something other than another memoir. This is why I try to make sure I’ve got lots of different types of books checked out from the library at all times, so I can fit the right book to my mood or situation. Blogging has actually really helped with this, because I try to post a mix of books, and that means I have to read a mix. No reading jags of nothing but mysteries for a month if I want to have any other material to share!

How I Choose What To ReadFrom a broader viewpoint, I find books to add to my reading list through a variety of sources: blogs, library newsletters, magazines, Goodreads…. I’ll often look for books on a particular topic if I want to learn more about it, and there are favorite authors I attempt to keep up-to-date on their works, so there are books I specifically search for (or not, now that I know some ways to easily find new releases by those favorite authors).

What genres do you find helpful, encouraging, or uplifting?

Memoirs and biographies are one of my favorite genres, and even though many of them are not necessarily any of those three, many of them are.

I also like a lot of Christian living / spiritual growth type books that fit those categories.

What are your priorities in reading — ie, why do you read?

I read to be educated. I read to grow spiritually. I read to learn more about people. I read to be entertained. I try to balance all of those goals as I vary what I’m reading, although it does depend on what else is happening in my life. If a pregnancy has me exhausted and all but brain dead? My reading choices are heavily weighted towards entertainment or lighter reads. (I may resemble this remark right now.) I wrote a post that somewhat addresses this topic as well – reading for quality vs. quantity)

How have you intentionally formed a Christian perspective on reading?

I haven’t ever explicitly thought about developing a Christian perspective on reading (although that might change when I read Lit!Lit!: A Christian Guide to Reading Books by Tony Reinke). I do try and keep in mind that my reading time is limited. If I say yes to this book, it means saying no to another book.

It’s something I continue to work on, and still need to improve at it – I find myself reading books that I end up wishing I hadn’t. I love historical fiction, and so often historical romances have a premise that will catch my eye. It is so rare for me to not regret spending my time reading those books – even if they are somewhat entertaining, they’re never entertaining enough to justify the reading time.

There aren’t many books I read that I think are harmful – those I can easily pass on. It’s generally “meh” reads that sometimes trip me up. The handful of books that I do think were harmful to me weren’t ones that I would have guessed would be. One dystopian read taught me that semi-realistic dystopian books get me to fret and stress over things I can’t control. The book wasn’t creepy or graphic, but the premise stressed me out. Now I know. Another mystery unexpectedly had one scene that was incredibly violent and horrifying, and it stuck in my brain in a very disturbing way. I immediately put the book aside and wished the reviews I’d read had given some sort of warning about the content.

Any other thoughts about reading, specifically as a disciple of Christ?

The main way I approach reading as a disciple of Christ is that I generally don’t let myself read anything unless I’ve read my Bible that morning, and I try to always have one or two books of a spiritual nature in my current reading stack.

March 2014 Recap

March 2014 RecapWe kicked off the month in Arizona, enjoying a week and a half of sunshine and warm weather. Then it was back to cold and grey Indiana, but Spring has to get here eventually. At least the snow is gone and I don’t have to get the kids in snow pants and boots before every trek outside – coats alone is so much easier.

The Month in Stats

Books Read Last Month: 22
Books Read For The Year: 49

Books I Read

Asterisks mark ones I especially enjoyed. Links go to my review if I’ve posted one, Amazon if I haven’t yet.

  1. Beaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of AmericaBeaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of America by Jonathan Dixon by Jonathan Dixon
    Not as compelling as Ruhlman’s book for a look at the CIA, or Flinn’s book if you want an account of cooking school.
  2. * Velma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in Leeway by Vinita Hampton Wright by Vinita Hampton Wright
    Loved this one, even if it did make me cry.
  3. * Fortune’s Pawn (Paradox Book 1)Fortune's Pawn (Paradox Book 1) by Rachel Bach by Rachel Bach
    Has me on the hunt for more science fiction that is as appealing. And by me, I mean Pamela is putting together a reading list for me. :)
  4. The War of ArtThe War of Art by Steven Pressfield by Steven Pressfield
  5. * Balanced: Finding Center as a Work-at-Home MomBalanced: Finding Center as a Work-at-Home Mom by Tricia Goyer by Tricia Goyer
  6. Damage Control (Joanna Brady Mysteries)Damage Control (Joanna Brady Mysteries) by J. A. Jance by J. A. Jance
    Not great literature, but it perfectly fit my reading mood while vacation, especially the Arizona setting.
  7. Writer’s Block: Vanquished! Using Images, Oracles and Brain-Hacks (Writing Skills)Writer's Block: Vanquished! Using Images, Oracles and Brain-Hacks (Writing Skills) by Nancy Hendrickson by Nancy Hendrickson
    Her tips are fine, they just don’t mesh well with my personality / style / needs.
  8. Do the WorkDo the Work by Steven Pressfield by Steven Pressfield
  9. * 30 Days of Writing Prompts
  10. * On Becoming a Writer: What Every Blogger Needs to KnowOn Becoming a Writer: What Every Blogger Needs to Know by Denise J. Hughes by Denise J. Hughes
  11. Aftermath, Inc.: Cleaning Up After CSI Goes HomeAftermath, Inc.: Cleaning Up After CSI Goes Home by Gil Reavill by Gil Reavill
    Too much about the author included, and it was surprisingly dull at times, and quite graphic at others.
  12. The Making of a NurseThe Making of a Nurse by Tilda Shalof by Tilda Shalof
    Some interesting stories, but it would have been better edited down by about 25%.
  13. 365 Days of Writing Prompts
  14. Three Sixty-Five: Ideas for Blog Posts, Scrapbook Pages & Art Journal Entries by Kam Altar
  15. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s BerlinIn the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin by Erik Larson by Erik Larson
    If you like Larson and his style, you’ll probably enjoy it.
  16. * Sorcery & Cecelia: or The Enchanted Chocolate PotSorcery & Cecelia: or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot (The Cecelia and Kate Novels, 1) by Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer by Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer
    A reread, because I love this book so much.
  17. Teach a Child to Read With Children’s Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading SuccessTeach a Child to Read With Children's Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading Success by Mark B. Thogmartin by Mark B. Thogmartin
    Trying to figure out a one-sentence comment on this book is beyond me at the moment. Mixed feelings might sum it up the best.
  18. Four Kitchens: My Life Behind the Burner in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv, and ParisFour Kitchens: My Life Behind the Burner in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv, and Paris by Lauren Shockey by Lauren Shockey
  19. The Grand Tour: or the Purloined Coronation RegaliaThe Grand Tour: or the Purloined Coronation Regalia (The Cecelia and Kate Novels, 2) by Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer by Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer
    Another reread, as I got ready to read the final book in the trilogy.
  20. * Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple NicklesCourage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles by Tanya Lee Stone by Tanya Lee Stone
    Very good, although I wanted more depth to it (it’s a juvenile title).
  21. All Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and CelebrationsAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and Celebrations by David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutsonby David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutson
    Not what I wanted or was hoping for from the book.
  22. * The Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern TableThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern Table by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence
    So many tempting ideas in here, the big question is which one do I try first.
  23. And one that I didn’t finish:

  24. The Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online GeniusThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online Genius by David Thorne by David Thorne
    Inconsistently funny, and although some of the entries had me laughing out loud, overall I wasn’t compelled to finish it.

[Read more...]