New on the Stack in April 2017

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Nonfiction

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary RoachPacking for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I love Mary Roach.

Clean My Space: The Secret to Cleaning Better, Faster, and Loving Your Home Every Day by Melissa MakerClean My Space: The Secret to Cleaning Better, Faster, and Loving Your Home Every Day by Melissa Maker

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: It kept appearing across my path, and I took it as a sign that I should read it. 😉

At Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe by Tsh OxenreiderAt Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe by Tsh Oxenreider

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m excited to read this new release – I followed her travels while they were happening, and am fascinated by this idea.

Loving My Actual Life: An Experiment in Relishing What's Right in Front of Me coverLoving My Actual Life: An Experiment in Relishing What’s Right in Front of Me by Alexandra Kuykendall

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Fell for the cover, but the premise sounds intriguing.

The New Comfort Food - Home Cooking from Around the World by SaveurSaveur: The New Comfort Food – Home Cooking from Around the World by James Oseland

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Fell for the cover, but I do know and trust Saveur’s recipes.

Other People's DirtOther People’s Dirt by Louise Rafkin

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Looking for a short audio book, and it was one of the first ones available.

Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners by Therese OneillUnmentionable: The Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners by Therese Oneill

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how I discovered this title, but it may be a fun historical read. I’m hoping for a Mary Roach-style look at the topic, but if the tone isn’t right, I may be sending it right back.

Cork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste by Bianca BoskerCork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste by Bianca Bosker

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I love memoirs.

Fiction

Uprooted by Naomi NovikUprooted by Naomi Novik

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s June’s book club title

Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer, illustrated by Douglas HolgateWires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer, illustrated by Douglas Holgate

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: A graphic novel continuing the Cinder series? I must read it!

Rivers of London Body WorkRivers of London: Body Work by Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel, illustrated by Lee Sullivan

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m reading everything I can find in the Peter Grant series. Even graphic novels.

Rivers of London Night WitchRivers of London: Night Witch by Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel, illustrated by Lee Sullivan

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Another graphic novel in the Peter Grant series.

Have Spacesuit Will Travel by Robert A. HeinleinHave Spacesuit Will Travel by Robert A. Heinlein

How did I get it: Borrowed the audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Catherine mentioned it in a recent conversation I had with her and I was curious about it.

Keeping the Castle by Patrice KindlKeeping the Castle by Patrice Kindl

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how it ended up on my TBR list.

A Sudden Fearful Death by Anne PerryA Sudden Fearful Death by Anne Perry

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the William Monk series.

The Sky is Falling by Kit PearsonThe Sky is Falling by Kit Pearson

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: For a project I’m working on. If I ever get it finished you’ll hear all about it. 😉

The Blue Jay by Michelle SchlicherThe Blue Jay by Michelle Schlicher

How did I get it: Freebie from Amazon.
Why did I get it: It sounded interesting enough to download as a freebie.

Amethyst coverAmethyst by Lauren Royal

How did I get it: Freebie from Amazon.
Why did I get it: If on the off chance I’m ever in the mood for this sort of title, now I have one ready to read. A.k.a., it was free, so all I’m spending is a little digital storage space.

May B coverMay B by Caroline Starr Rose

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: I love this book.

Gone Fishing coverGone Fishing by Tamera Will Wissinger, illustrated by Matthew Cordell

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: Adding to my poetry collection for homeschool.

Gone Camping coverGone Camping by Tamera Will Wissinger, illustrated by Matthew Cordell

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: Adding to my poetry collection for homeschool.

Book Scavenger coverBook Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: It was on a major sale, and I couldn’t resist.

Bo at Iditarod CreekBo at Idatirod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Loved Bo at Ballard Creek, and wanted to read more of Bo’s story.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or Instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Cover Love: Dark Matter by Blake Crouch

This new “Cover Love” series is inspired by the “Judging Books by Their Covers” series previously run at Quirky Bookworm.

Please note that this post includes spoilers.

If you haven’t read Dark Matter, I’m not kidding: the book is much better if read it without hearing spoilers. In other words, read the post only after you finish the book. If you still need to read it, find the book here: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads.

Most cover images are taken from a question posted by Katie, who facilitated the discussion on the book in the Facebook group. I’ve also quoted her commentary on the German and Spanish titles, as I thought it was very insightful.

Dark Matter American hardback cover

The American hardback cover, and the one I was familiar with before searching for additional covers. It’s eye-catching, but before reading the book I didn’t care for it. After finishing the book, I can appreciate the subtle hints it provides to the story.

Dark Matter American paperback cover

The American paperback cover. I feel like this is more distracting than the very similar hardback version, but emphasizes the thriller aspect of the novel.

Dark Matter Australian cover

The Australian version. I get what they’re doing with what looks like red paper cut into strips, but it doesn’t do much for me as a cover, and it wouldn’t make me pick up the book.

Dark Matter German cover

The German cover. “The subtitle is odd, because he’s not a time-traveler, he’s a multiverse traveler. But time travel is Zeitreise, so I guess maybe the plural Zeiten conveys the multiple worlds? And then runner because it’s a race to return to his life/the thriller aspect. Mostly I just love the blurb, because Wahnsinn (craziness) is one of my favorite words in German, and also totally describes this book! Germans and their understatement.”

Dark Matter Spanish cover

The Spanish cover “focuses more on the dark matter of the title (materia obscura = dark matter), with all the little drops of oily black, but it also reminds one of the examples Jason2 uses to explain the multiverse to Daniela, describing each universe as a pond and the fish inside have no idea there are other ponds and a world that holds them.”

Dark Matter Twitter promotional cover

Promotional cover posted to Twitter. Makes complete sense once you know the story, and I’m surprised it was never used in any other way (apparently).

UK paperback cover. I like the maze-like appearance, and that Amanda is there, as she was such a great character. This may be my favorite cover.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on Your Stack (volume 24)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


A Study in Charlotte by Brittany CavallaroKate (Opinionated Book Lover) planned to read A Study in Charlotte, which is currently on my library holds list. I’ve been a bit obsessed lately with reading Sherlock Holmes-inspired fiction, and lots of buzz surrounding this one meant it was on my “get to this one soon” list. Ok, soon-ish.


Inside the Medieval World by National Geographic coverArwen (The Tech Chef) added tons of children’s books to her bookshelves last month, but what really caught my eye was Inside the Medieval World published by National Geographic. I am fascinated by that time period and am so tempted to get this for myself.


I’m not even sure which book to highlight from Stacie’s post at Sincerely Stacie because she’s got over 30 listed! So I went for the one which I had just checked out the day before – Cork Dork (I am such a sucker for memoirs). But be sure and go to her post and see all the other books she mentions – Beyond Bedlam’s Door sounded really interesting, and I love David Allen, so Ready for Anything is one I want to check out. Her fiction choices included intriguing ones like The Practice House, It’s Always the Husband, The Breakdown, Sugar, Stars Over Clear Lake, and The Roanoke Girls. Whew! Stacie has plot summaries or descriptions for all of these, plus her children’s book finds included in her post.


I’m always tickled when I see people getting books for my book club, and Jill grabbed Funny in Farsi when it was a Kindle special price. It’s no longer at that price but I’m keeping an eye on it for future deals & post them to my Facebook page if I spot them.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Quarterly Update on Book Club Books

Covers for 2017 quarter 1 book club booksWhile I’ve shared about my Facebook book club selections, and I end up sharing what my in-person book club is reading thanks to New on the Stack posts, I haven’t been circling back and sharing what I thought of our selections, or how well they work as book club picks.

January

The Deliberate Reader book club (TDR) read Animal Vegetable Miracle and Broadened Horizons book club (BH) read Ready Player One. Both were great discussion titles (although I sadly had to miss the in-person chat on Ready Player One due to a sick kid. Advantage Facebook for that: I can work around children’s needs easier and not miss out on the discussion. So yes, I’m saying it’s a great discussion title based on reports from my friends.

Animal Vegetable Miracle was super inspiring as far as making me want to plant a garden of my own. Perhaps it’d have been better read in March, when I could move ahead on those urges, instead of January when I got all fired up, and then couldn’t actually do much of anything about it, at least in frozen Indiana. It was fascinating hearing what people across the country had to say about things such as locally-available foods and gardening opportunities. Another advantage for the virtual book club: broader geographic representation was a bonus for this title!

February

TDR read Moloka’i, and BH read The Year of Living Danishly. Moloka’i is a heart-wrenching book, but such a compelling look at another world and time. I enjoyed the book tremendously and enjoyed getting to talk about it even more. It’s a good one for a book club.

The Year of Living Danishly is much lighter in feel and style, and not a must-read. However, it actually is well-served as a discussion choice -it added quite a bit to the topic by hearing different takes on the ideas from the book, and ways we can bring some hygge into our Midwestern lives. However, I’d say that one is skippable unless you’re going to talk about it with someone.

March

TDR discussed Emma, and BH chatted about And Then There Were None while we enjoyed our annual tea party. Emma was my least-favorite discussion of the five I participated in for the first quarter, and that says much more about how good those other ones were than anything about it in particular. I think I may have liked Emma as a discussion title the most of all of Jane Austen’s books. I’m not 100% certain of that claim, but I’m leaning that way. 🙂

And Then There Were None surprised me in how discussable it was. I was concerned that it would be a bit limited to plot twists and did-you-figure-it-out questions, but it ended up being more involved than that. Since the nature of some of the questions veers into spoiler territory, I’ll leave it that if you’re looking for a mystery for a book club, two thumbs up to this classic Christie title.

All in all, I’d say these were six winners as far as discussion titles go, it just depends on your sort of book club and what type of book you’re wanting. I’d pick Animal, Vegetable, Miracle as the best option of the two nonfiction choices, and fiction it just depends on what genre or style of book you want: they’re all completely different, so it’s really hard to directly compare them.


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Introducing May’s Book Club Selection: Hannah Coulter

hannah-coulter

What’s It About?

(Description from Goodreads)

“Ignorant boys, killing each other,” is just about all Nathan Coulter would tell his wife, friends, and family about the Battle of Okinawa in the spring of 1945. Life carried on for the community of Port William, Kentucky, as some boys returned from the war and the lives of others were mourned. In her seventies, Nathan’s wife, Hannah, has time now to tell of the years since the war. In Wendell Berry’s unforgettable prose, we learn of the Coulter’s children, of the Feltners and Branches, and how survivors “live right on.”

Why Was This Title Selected

Our literary fiction pick for the year, and because I’ve been wanting to get to one of Berry’s books.

Anything Else to Know About It?

The discussion will begin soon in the Facebook group, and you’re welcome to come and join us.

It’s available in Print, for Kindle or Nook, or via Audible.

What’s Coming Up Next?

UprootedUprooted by Naomi Novik

What’s it about? Agnieszka’s native village of Dvernik is menaced by something in the surrounding woods, protected only by the local sorcerer. Every decade he chooses a village girl to serve him. Agnieszka is about to find out what happens to those girls during their years of service.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.

See all the books we’ll be reading in 2017 here.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Black Coffee by Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie's Black Coffee - a Hercule Poirot mysteryBlack Coffee by Agatha Christie, adapted as a novel by Charles Osborne

Miss Marple is my preferred Christie character – she amuses me in a way that Poirot does not. The additional bonus with Miss Marple is the lack of Hastings in the narrative – I’m not a big fan of his bumbling.

So, Black Coffee had some strikes against it already when it came to a Christie title – it’s Poirot, and Hastings is in it. Then when I borrowed the title I discovered that it was originally a play, written by Christie, but adapted into a novel by someone else.

Unfortunately, that adaptation shows. The action is very tightly located, and there felt like an excess of directions – someone enters the room, sits here, moves there, etc. I have no doubt it works better as a play, where the limitations that felt cramped in a novel are appropriate for a theatre setting.

I don’t regret reading it by any means, and for Poirot fans or anyone wanting to be sure to read all of Christie’s works it’s a must-read. For anyone else, it’s skippable.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Nook | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:

Inventor Sir Claude Amory feels a bitter taste in the mouth, when the new formula for explosive material stolen by someone in the household.

In order to quickly remedy the situation, Sir Claude locks the door and turns off the light, giving the thief a chance to return the formula without being detected. But darkness brings death and Hercule Poirot has to untangle family strife, love and suspicious visitors tangle in order to clarify the murderer and prevent disaster.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Ultimate List of Library Hacks

This week is National Library Week, and I want to help you make the most of your library.

Every library and library system is different, so the most important tip is the first one – get to know YOUR library, and see what they have to offer.

(photo credit: Sarah Ronk)

    The Basics

  1. Dig deep into your library’s website and see what’s there – not all library systems have the same resources, and specifics will vary depending on where you live. Look for website pages like “using your library” or “services” to get the details.
  2. Know your limits – for reserves, checkouts, ILL requests.
  3. Provide your email address when you sign up for your library card – most systems will use it to send email reminders about due dates.
  4. Sign up for the library newsletters – it’s one of the best ways to stay informed as to events and programs they’re offering. Author talks, movie nights, special displays, craft programs, and language lessons have all been offered at my local library recently.
  5. Got questions? Ask the librarians – they love helping. If you don’t have time to go into the library, see if they offer phone, text, or chat support as well.
  6. Requesting Titles and Putting Materials on Hold

  7. If you don’t see something you want – ask for it! Most libraries have ways for you to suggest titles for purchase. Bonus: often you’ll be placed at the front of the line to borrow items you’ve suggested if they decide to purchase them.
  8. Place items on hold so they’re available for easy pick-up. This is especially helpful if they’re popular items you’ll never see on the shelf, but it also makes things easier if you’ve got small children who make library visits more challenging.
  9. Suspend your holds if you know you won’t be able to pick them up (say, you’re going on vacation), or if you need to balance out your requests (say, if you’ve gone on a reserving binge and don’t want ALL THE BOOKS to arrive at once). You may have options of suspending holds for anywhere from 1 to 180 days, and should be able to remove the suspension at any time.
  10. Looking for a popular title? Check into alternative formats, such as electronic copies, audio books (downloadable and CD copies), or even large print.
  11. Digital Advantages

  12. Adjust your dates – you may be able to modify checkout times for electronic items from anywhere between 3 and 21 days
  13. Your reading list is bigger than your check-out limit? Create a wishlist (or two) and make it easy to remember what you want to borrow next. Depending on the system, you may be able to have separate wishlists for digital and physical books, and may even be able to have more than one wishlist saved by the library system.
  14. Look into all the digital options offered. Possibilities include Hoopla for TV, movies, documentaries, instructional videos, or music; Freegal for music or music videos, and Flipster or Zinio for magazines. That’s in addition to options for books and audiobooks!
  15. Use the Google Chrome extension to quickly search for a book at your library. While you browse Amazon, GoodReads, or other book-focused sites, it’ll tell you immediately if a book is available at your library.
  16. More Than Just Books

  17. Think beyond books – libraries may loan physical items such as tools, kitchen equipment, board games, puzzles, toys, even art.
  18. Researching something specialized? See what databases are offered, and know that additional options may be available to use from the library itself. If you’re into genealogy, it’s common that libraries offer Heritage Quest access from your home computer, but Ancestry’s database can only be used while in the library. Other databases may have similar restrictions due to licensing agreements.
  19. Libraries often offer free or discounted rates on meeting space. Sometimes they have spaces that can be used but not reserved in advance, and other times they may have rooms you can book ahead of time, depending on your needs and their policies. Be sure to read library policies to know what’s permitted in the space and what isn’t.
  20. Most public libraries offer WiFi for free, and many also have computers to use, as well as printing capabilities (for a nominal fee).
  21. Looking to learn something? See if your library offers Mango, Lynda, Gale, or Rosetta Stone. They may also have free or low-cost tutoring, as well as classes on various topics. Tech help and tinker stations are also common if you’re considering an e-reader but need some assistance.
  22. Still Need More?

  23. Take advantage of Inter Library Loan – if your library doesn’t have a particular book and you need that specific title, see if you can get it from another library via ILL. These titles are sometimes loaned with more restriction, such as a shorter loan period and no possibility of renewing the loan, so be aware of that before you request. Libraries often have limits on how many ILL requests you can place in a time period, such as one per month. There may be a small fee for them as well (usually it’s under $5, and meant to cover postage).
  24. Want to add to your own library collection? Check out the library book sales. You can get great deals on used books and support your library at the same time.
  25. Look into getting access to other libraries in your area. You may already be a member of a library consortium, or you may be able to purchase membership to a larger library (and it may be worth it to you if they have significantly better offerings). You may also have access to local college or university libraries and their more specialized collections.

March 2017 Recap

March 2017 RecapKnock on wood, but I think the change of seasons has also brought with it a healthier family. That was ridiculously lingering and annoying and I do hope it’s gone forever.

March also had some super weird weather – some really mild days and then cold again (even a bit of snow), but I guess none of that is surprising for March in Indiana. Despite living here for over a decade I still find myself expecting March to be warmer than it reliably is. At this point, I think it’s just in my DNA and won’t be changing and I’ll always associate March with Spring Training and watching baseball outside in shorts and hoping to avoid a sunburn. 🙂

March 2017 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 12
Books Read This Year: 32

Things That Happened
  • In the Facebook book club we discussed Emma.
  • My in-person book club had our annual tea party discussed And Then There Were None.
  • H had her first softball practice, and her first rained-out softball practice. She was super disappointed about the second because “I need to practice catching because I’m not very good at it!”
  • G finished his basketball season. His team was pretty dreadful, but he did improve and he had fun with it, so that’s good enough.
  • G also had Pinewood Derby for Cub Scouts. He ended up coming in 6th place, which wasn’t too bad considering how late he was getting started on it. He ran out of time to do some of the finesse stuff that he could have otherwise. Bonus: he got to use some power tools (under supervision) so that was fun for him.
What’s Cooking
  • Cabbage. Butter-sauteed with salt and pepper and I love it.
  • I’ve been picking up take-and-bake pizza bout once a week all month, because I’ve discovered their special pricing – a large cheese, pepperoni, or sausage pizza for $5. I can’t make one for much less than that (if at all), and certainly not when I give any sort of value to my time. If I cared that much I could add extra toppings of my own on at home, but so far I haven’t cared that much.
What I’m Anticipating in April
  • Book club – A Gentleman in Moscow for my in-person book club and Dark Matter in the Facebook group.
  • Baseball begins for G, and both kids have their opening day festivities. On the same day, which is super frustrating as a parent.
  • Belt testing – G goes for recommended black belt (black belt with a red stripe down the middle), and H goes for senior blue belt (which is the last belt that attends the intermediate classes)
Books I Read in March
  1. A Dangerous Place by Jacqueline Winspear
  2. The Long Way Home by Louise Penny
  3. An Impartial Witness by Charles Todd
  4. Another Kind of Hurricane by Tamara Ellis Smith
  5. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
  6. The Little Book of Hygge: Danish Secrets to Happy Living by Meik Wiking
  7. A Dangerous Mourning by Anne Perry
  8. Emma by Jane Austen
  9. Watchers of Time by Charles Todd
  10. Dark Matter by Blake Crouch
  11. The Hanging Tree by Ben Aaronovitch
  12. Art of the Pie by Kate McDermott

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on the Stack in March 2017

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Yes, I know, once again I’ve borrowed an absurd number of books from the library. I had some long-awaited holds come in finally (The Hanging Tree!), plus me not being able to resist grabbing some others that were available. Some of them have already been returned unfinished, which I’ve noted in my comments about them.

Nonfiction

Siblings without Rivalry by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Hoping for some ideas to improve things between my oldest two.

The Revenge of Analog by David Sax
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It sounded interesting, but I ended up letting it go back to the library without attempting to renew it. It was much drier than I was in the mood for, and I didn’t care that much about the topic.

When to Rob a Bank: …And 131 More Warped Suggestions and Well-Intended Rants by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I was looking for an audio book to borrow via Overdrive and this one popped up as available. I’ve since discovered that apparently my phone is out of storage space and can’t download anything so I’ve listened to none of it. Whoops.

Eat Dirt: Why Leaky Gut May Be the Root Cause of Your Health Problems and 5 Surprising Steps to Cure It by Josh Axe
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Hoped for something fairly accessible and reputible about gut health. Apparently I still couldn’t make myself care about it because I stalled out on reading it midway through chapter two.

Art of the Pie by Kate McDermott
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s the current “Big Library Read” on Overdrive, so every time I went to my library’s digital catalog, I saw the cover. I couldn’t resist.

Four Seasons in Rome by Anthony Doerr
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’ve been wanting to try it, as I do love travel memoirs.

Fiction

Dark Matter by Blake CrouchDark Matter by Blake Crouch
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: April’s selection for book club!

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: My in-person book club’s April selection.

My Antonia by Willa Cather
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: My in-person book club’s May selection.

The Hanging Tree by Ben Aaronovitch
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s the latest in the Peter Grant series!!!

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Quick speed-listen to refresh my memory on characters and events before March’s book club meeting.

A Dangerous Mourning by Anne Perry
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Rereading the William Monk series.

The Long Way Home by Louise Penny
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next book in the Armand Gamache series.

A Dangerous Place by Jacqueline Winspear
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next book in the Maisie Dobbs series.

Watchers of Time by Charles Todd
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next book in the Ian Rutledge series.

A Bitter Truth by Charles Todd
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Bess Crawford series

Black Coffee by Agatha Christie, adapted as a novel by Charles Osborne
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Hercule Poirot series

A Fearsome Doubt by Charles Todd
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Ian Rutledge series

Journey to Munich by Jacqueline Winspear
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Maisie Dobbs series

The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next book in the Armand Gamache series

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Need to get moving on my book flight

Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how this one ended up on my library holds list, but it did and then it appeared on my kindle when my turn arrived. 😉

Hannah Coulter by Wendell Berry
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: May’s book club selection, and I’m trying to get ahead on my reading, as I’ve cut it too close with a couple of them. Except there’s some weird sort of glitch going on and it’s not letting me download it. I don’t know – I need to call the library or send in a chat request because I do know how to borrow ebooks and download them, but something isn’t working right with this one. It won’t even let me return it and try again. Technology, you’re so awesome until you aren’t. 😉

Defend and Betray by Anne Perry
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Rereading the William Monk series.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or Instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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New on Your Stack (volume 23)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


I have mixed feelings about historical fiction that uses real people as characters in their novels. This isn’t a blanket “never do it!” but I get a little nervous about how the author does it.

All that to say, Jill (Days at Home) highlights First Impressions by Charlie Lovett and I’m interested but slightly concerned about the Jane Austen character in the secondary story line.

Maybe I’m extra tempted by it because the audible version is narrated by Jayne Entwistle, who is one of my favorites. My library has it so it’ll be easy to give it a try.


Kate (Opinionated Book Lover) and I shared one title on our TBR lists last month, but since it’s for the same book club I guess it wasn’t surpring to see Emma appear on her list. 🙂

She also let me know that the Starflight duology is complete now that Starfall has been published. I checked out the first book but quickly returned it when I realized that there was a second book. I wanted to be able to read them both close together if necessary (in other words, I didn’t want a forced long wait for the publication date to arrive.) Now I’ll let her read it and tell me if the two together are worth the reading time. I want them to be.


Stacie (Sincerely Stacie) has some really intriguing titles this month but the one I’m most interested in is A Bridge Across the Ocean. The cover is so pretty, and I do so often enjoy alternating time lines. I’m waiting to hear how she likes it.

I’m also curious to see how she likes Rules of Civility, which she added to her reading stack last month. That was such a great book and it made for such a great discussion title in book club!


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!