What the Kids are Reading (in February 2016)

Late in January I finally closed out my Usborne kickoff parties and cashed in on the free books I earned through them.

I got a TON of books, and we’ve been reading and reading them. Here are the board books I received – stay tuned for later posts about all the other books. It was an amazing shipment! So, yes, most of the books we read in February were either picture books about the Arctic or Korea, or our new books. Since I’ve already posted about those themed picture books, today’s post is all about the books we actually added to our bookshelf. So exciting!

Board Books and Activity Books

Busy Train bookBusy Train Book
I *thought* I was just getting this as a display book for home shows. Ha! My kids – all of them – LOVE this book. Who knew a train driving around in loops could be so amazingly entertaining?

My Wild Animal WorldMy Wild Animal World
Another huge hit here – my youngest is obsessed with opening the big book, and then removing the 9 individual books, flipping through them, and then putting them back in the big book. The other two love reading these with her too, so it’s a double win!

Slide and See Under the SeaSlide-and-See Under the Sea

And yet another huge hit with the toddler. She loves the textures, she loves the various interactive features – it’s fantastic. I’ve even caught the other two flipping through it, and both are eager to read it to her.

Little Red Penguin ShapesLittle Red Penguin Shapes

The toddler likes lifting the flaps on this one, but it doesn’t captivate her as much as some of their other choices. However, I like the smaller size on this, as it’s easy to keep in my purse and pull out when I need a little bit of distraction.

Pop-Up JunglePop-Up Jungle

Really pretty pop-ups, but it’s probably the least popular of all the board and interactive books I’ve gotten from Usborne, perhaps because it’s got all these tempting elements – the snapping crocodile jaws, the swinging monkey, the slithering snake – and I won’t let her grab any of them.

Peek Inside the ZooPeek Inside the Zoo

A great first lift the flap book, as the flaps are bigger than in some of their other titles. Pretty illustrations too – I really like it. That said, it just misses being one of the biggest hits of this order, but I can see my youngest liking it more as she gets a bit older. It’s suggested for kids 3 and up, and based on my experiences with my three, I’d agree with that. 🙂

Felix and Ella's VacationFelix & Ella’s Vacation

It’s a huge, reusable sticker book: of course my kids are obsessed with it. It was all I could do to keep them from tearing into it the first day it arrived. We haven’t had it long enough to really test the long-term re-usability factor of the stickers but so far they’re definitely movable.

Big Book of ColorsBig Book of Colors

My 4 year old LOVES this. The 6 year old really likes it too, but not as much as his sister. I have to admit I kind of wanted this one for myself – I love the colors, I love the color wheel, I love the acrylic overlay that lets you see how colors change. Love love love. It’s great for color vocabulary too.

I Want to Be a Lion TamerI Want to Be a Lion Tamer by Ruby Brown, illustrated by Alisa Coburn

Usborne has a handful of books that are great transitions from board books to picture books, and this is one of them – the pages are thicker and plastic-coated, so while they feel and turn more like picture books, they’re sturdier like board books. This has great illustrations with an old-fashioned feel, and the message is fantastic. I really debated between choosing this one or the I Want to Be An Astronaut, but like this one so much I may end up getting both. 🙂

Look Inside Mummies and PyramidsLook Inside Mummies and Pyramids

I got this as a fun extra for our upcoming homeschool history program, and cannot WAIT to pull it out and let my son see it. He’s going to love it, I’m certain.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: How I Decided to Homeschool and How I Decided on a Curriculum
Two years ago: Women Heroes of WWII
Three years ago: Let’s Talk about Spoilers

newest reads board books interactive books February 2016February 2016 Usborne board books

What the Kids are Reading (in January 2016)

That Is Not a Good IdeaThat Is Not a Good Idea!That Is Not a Good Idea! by Mo Willems by Mo Willems

They are *obsessed* with this one. Great repetition, fun illustrations, and a twist that makes them laugh every time.

Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You SeeBrown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr, illustrated by Eric Carle by Bill Martin Jr, illustrated by Eric Carle

Wonderfully repetitive – I keep thinking H is going to get tired of reciting it to herself, but so far she hasn’t.

Polar Bear Polar Bear What Do You HearPolar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? by Bill Martin, Jr. illustrated by Eric Carle by Bill Martin Jr, illustrated by Eric Carle

Just like the Brown Bear book, only with a polar bear and sounds. H loves this one too, and reads both of them to her sister (and how adorable is that?).

That's Not My HedgehogThat’s Not My Hedgehog by Fiona Watt, illustrated by Rachel Wells

We already owned other titles in the “That’s Not My…” series, but M got this one for Christmas and it quickly became her favorite. It’s all about the scratchy texture on the last page – she loves it! Plus, you know, finding the little mouse on each page is super fun as well.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Parnassus on Wheels by Christopher Morley
Two years ago: Book Review: Coming Clean by Kimberly Rae Miller
Three years ago: Getting Geeky: 2012 Reads, Charts & Graphs Style

What the Kids are Reading (in December 2015)

December 2015 Picture Books

We did read more Christmas books than those listed below; these are just the new-to-us ones I tried from the library. One of these days I should make a complete listing of the Christmas books, instead of having them scattered across various posts from different years. Maybe that’ll happen for 2016. 😉

A Tale of Two BeastsA Tale of Two Beasts by Fiona Roberton

Probably my favorite from the month – I loved the double perspective this one provides, as the story is told twice, once from the viewpoint of the little girl, and once from the animal’s point of view. The way the illustrations are also adjusted for each recounting is really clever too. The kids liked it as well, and have asked for it repeatedly.

AnimallyAnimally by Lynn Parrish Sutton

Very sweet story, with lots of fun adverbs plus of course all the great animals. I can see why this one was recommended to me so highly.

There's a Mouse about the HouseThere’s a Mouse about the House by R. Fowler

I got this one because of a relative raving about how much her children loved it when they were growing up. Initially, I was skeptical about how much my kids would like it, but I didn’t need to be – my kids are OBSESSED with putting the little mouse through each page’s slot. The one drawback is that the mouse is easy to lose, even with the little pocket on the front cover (ask me how I know this.) At least the back cover has a template for making your own replacement mouse. 🙂

Old AbeOld Abe, Eagle Hero: The Civil War’s Most Famous Mascot by Anne Lee

Good as an older picture book, as it’s got more text on each page. I’d recommend it if you’re looking for material about the Civil War that doesn’t get into graphic detail, but just touches on the time period, or if you’ve got animal lovers. Otherwise, it’s not a must read or one that I’d suggest for younger readers, as it likely won’t hold their interest. My 6 year old thought it was ok,; my 4 year old didn’t stick around for more than a page or two. I’ll try it again with them in another year or two.

Blue Whale BluesBlue Whale Blues by Peter Carnavas

Cute story, and the kids were amused at the “wrong” names and uses for various items they easily recognized (the upside down shopping cart that the Whale calls his bike, etc.). They also thought it was hilarious when Whale is sad that his “bike” is “all wet.”

Johnny Appleseed the Story of a LegendJohnny Appleseed: The Story of a LegendJohnny Appleseed: The Story of a Legend by Will Moses by Will Moses

A school book for G, and he liked it, and he liked telling daddy about what he’d learned about Johnny Appleseed. Nice illustrations too, but it’s not a toddler or preschooler-targeted picture book: it’s very text-heavy, and is unlikely to keep their interest. As a readaloud for a first grader, it’s excellent.

The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan ToomeyThe Christmas Miracle of Jonathan ToomeyThe Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey by Susan Wojciechowski, illustrated by P.J. Lynch by Susan Wojciechowski, illustrated by P.J. Lynch

New to us all this year, and what a wonderful book! Both the story and illustrations are lovely, and I want to buy a copy to add to our regular advent reading rotation. The 4 year old wasn’t that interested in it, but I think by next year she’ll like it.

Christmas OrangesChristmas OrangesChristmas Oranges by Linda Bethers, illustrated by Ben Sowards by Linda Bethers, illustrated by Ben Sowards

Gorgeously illustrated, but I wasn’t expecting to get choked up by the story. It’s another picture book that’s better for 6 & up at least, both because of the amount of text, and because of the themes discussed.

Click Clack Ho Ho HoClick, Clack, Ho! Ho! Ho!Click, Clack, Ho! Ho! Ho! by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Betsy Lewin by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Betsy Lewin

I adore Click Clack Moo and others by Cronin and Lewin, but this one wasn’t one of my favorites of theirs. I’m also not a big fan of Santa-focused books though, so that plays a huge role in my feelings. Try it from the library (most medium to larger ones should have a copy) and see if it’s a good fit for your family before buying it.

Llama Llama Holiday DramaLlama Llama Holiday DramaLlama Llama Holiday Drama by Anna Dewdney by Anna Dewdney

My first Llama Llama book, and maybe I shouldn’t have picked this one as my introduction to the series? I was unimpressed with it. Thinking I should give Llama Llama another try, because I know they’re hugely popular, and maybe this was just not representative of what they’re usually like.

Disclosure: Several of these are Usborne books, and I’m an independent consultant for them (i.e., I sell them). I’m still going to give you my honest opinion on their books though, because every book isn’t right for every reader. If you buy from my link I’ll receive a commission, which goes to support the blog and my homeschooling adventure. Non-Usborne titles are linked to Amazon, and those are affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in October and November 2015)

Lots of books to share about this month, especially since I missed last month with my book club series.

A Sick Day for Amos McGeeA Sick Day for Amos McGeeA Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
I’ve seen this listed so many places as a recommended picture book, and I enthusiastically agree –
it’s wonderful!

Orange Pear Apple BearOrange Pear Apple BearOrange Pear Apple Bear by Emily Gravett by Emily Gravett
We’ve read this one dozens of times already, and will probably be adding this to our “buy this book” lit. It’s fantastic, and I was so impressed with the illustrations, and how the author tells the story with such limited vocabulary.

MooMoo!Moo! by David LaRochelle, illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka by David LaRochelle, illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka
My kids (yes, both of them) laughed and laughed and laughed at this one. Another one we may end up buying. Lots of fun to read aloud, if you’re willing to really throw yourself into it and get expressive. 🙂

The Day the Crayons QuitThe Day the Crayons QuitThe Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers
Another hit this month, and now we want to read the sequel, The Day the Crayons Came HomeThe Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers.

The Firekeeper’s SonThe Firekeeper’s SonThe Firekeeper's Son by Linda Sue Park, illustrated by Julie Downing by Linda Sue Park, illustrated by Julie Downing
Not a favorite for my kids, but one I may try again in another six months or so. I liked the idea of it more than the book itself, which didn’t keep their interest.

Hanna’s Cold WinterHanna’s Cold WinterHanna's Cold Winter by Trish Marx, illustrated by Barbara Knutson by Trish Marx, illustrated by Barbara Knutson
I wasn’t sure if my kids would care about it, but they loved it! We read it several times the first week after borrowing it, and then they kept it in their room to reread it (or “reread” it) as desired.

The Story of FerdinandThe Story of FerdinandThe Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson
My kids were not as interested in this as I expected them to be. I was overcome by nostalgia when reading it, so I’m sure that colored my expectations, but still: come on kids, this is a classic!

Bears Don’t Read by Emma Chichester ClarkBear’s Don’t Read by Emma Chichester Clark
Very cute story, with sweet illustrations (and great expressions on the bear’s face). I liked the ending quite a bit, and though I wasn’t sure how the kids would like it, they were enthralled!

Secrets of the Seashore by Carron Brown, illustrated by Alyssa NassnerSecrets of the Seashore by Carron Brown, illustrated by Alyssa Nassner
Nonfiction picture book, and my kids loved the flashlight trick this book includes (when you shine a light behind the page you see hidden illustrations). What could have just been a gimmick was pretty well-done at adding to the information.

CinderellaCinderella (retold by Susanna Davidson, illustrated by Lorena Alvarez)
The familiar story, with some subtle variations. My daughter (princess-obsessed as she is) claimed this book for her own, and she loved how she already knew the story. Nicely illustrated.

GossieGossieGossie (Gossie & Friends) by Olivier Dunrea by Olivier Dunrea
Cute enough, but not one I felt compelled to read again, and not one the kids asked to hear more than once.

Double PinkDouble PinkDouble Pink by Kate Feiffer by Kate Feiffer
Meh. My daughter’s pick, and it isn’t one I’d recommend you make any effort to find. If you also have a pink-obsessed daughter and can find it at the library, she’d probably be delighted.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Etiquette and Espionage by Gail Carriger
Two years ago: Book Review: Far from Home by Mary Herring Wright
Three years ago: Why to Track the Books You Read

What the Kids are Reading (in August 2015)

What the Kids are Reading August 2015Boot & ShoeBoot & ShoeBoot & Shoe by Marla Frazee by Marla Frazee

Super cute, and my kids *love* the page with the squirrel running around everywhere. There is a little bit of potty humor because the two dogs pee on the same tree. My kids thought that idea was hilarious, and I was amused at the role that fact ended up playing in the story. We’ve already reread it several times.

How to Make an Apple Pie and See the WorldHow to Make an Apple Pie and See the WorldHow to Make an Apple Pie and See the World by Marjorie Priceman by Marjorie Priceman

I think this suffered by my inflated expectations. We liked it, but didn’t love love love it like I thought we would. It was a fun way to talk about geography a bit, but we’ve already done that so much it didn’t interest my son as much as it likely would have otherwise. I think he was also being too literal with the ideas in it. Why would they travel all the way over there for this – that makes no sense?!? We’re still going to try her follow-up title, How to Make a Cherry Pie and See the U.S.A.How to Make a Cherry Pie and See the U.S.A. by Marjorie Priceman

Puff the Magic DragonPuff, the Magic DragonPuff, the Magic Dragon by Peter Yarrow and Lenny Lipton, illustrated by Eric Puybaret by Peter Yarrow and Lenny Lipton, illustrated by Eric Puybaret

Beautifully illustrated with the familiar text from the famous song. It was surprisingly hard to read the book without singing it. The bittersweet nature of the text also jumped out at me this time (as the last time I heard the song I was still quite young).

Harry and HorsieHarry and HorsieHarry and Horsie (Harry and Horsie Adventures) by Katie Van Camp, illustrated by Lincoln Agnew by Katie Van Camp, illustrated by Lincoln Agnew

Really cute story and illustrations – my kids were entertained by this one.

The Pout Pout FishThe Pout-Pout FishThe Pout-Pout Fish (A Pout-Pout Fish Adventure) by Deborah Diesen, illustrated by Dan Hanna by Deborah Diesen, illustrated by Dan Hanna

The hit of the month – my kids LOVED it. LOVED it. I’ve lost track of how many times we’ve read it, and I’ve heard them reciting the one refrain again and again. I like a lot of the language in it as well – “kaleidoscope of nope” might be my favorite.

Hopper and WilsonHopper and WilsonHopper and Wilson by Maria Van Lieshout by Maria Van Lieshout

This reminded me a bit of Winnie the Pooh, and I’m not sure why. The gentle story line and illustrations? The odd friendship pairing of an elephant and a mouse? Whatever the reason, it’s a very sweet book, with lovely illustrations.

Pirate Nap a Book of ColorsPirate Nap: A Book of ColorsPirate Nap: A Book of Colors by Danna Smith, illustrated by Valeria Petrone by Danna Smith, illustrated by Valeria Petrone

One of my two Bookroo books this month. We’ve read a lot of books about colors, and this was one of my favorites. An overall story line that holds up on its own, plus integrating the colors into the story, plus pirates = big winner here. My daughter thought the purple monster part was the best.

Hugless Douglas and the Big Sleep-OverHugless Douglas and the Big Sleep-OverHugless Douglas and the Big Sleep-Over by David Melling by David Melling

One of my two Bookroo books this month. I thought it was fine, if nothing too exciting, but my kids were vastly entertained by it (especially the aftermath of the sneeze.) I’m looking for others in this series to get from the library since mine were so tickled by this one.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in June 2015)

Lots of new library books this month, and there should be lots again next month (summer reading program at the library – extra motivation to check out books from there!)

The Brave CowboyThe Brave CowboyThe Brave Cowboy by Joan Walsh Anglund by Joan Walsh Anglund

Loved this one. LOVED it. I recognized the author’s style from a book I read as a child (A Friend Is Someone Who Likes YouA Friend Is Someone Who Likes You by Joan Walsh Anglund) so that certainly helped me be predisposed to enjoy it. But the storyline was delightful, and the illustrations are charming. I loved how she story is presented – the illustrations are quite clever. My son enjoyed it quite a bit, although my daughter didn’t seem to care about it. Even with that, it’s still highly recommended.

The Seven Silly EatersThe Seven Silly EatersThe Seven Silly Eaters by Mary Ann Hoberman, illustrated by Marla Frazee by Mary Ann Hoberman, illustrated by Marla Frazee

I found this on a list of picture books you should read to your children. And then on another list of recommended titles. And I finally requested it from the library, and why oh why did I wait so long? It really is silly, but in such a fun way. My kids both really enjoyed it too. Great illustrations, great language that’s enjoyable to read – it’s a winner. Highly recommended as well.

SmokeySmokeySmokey by Bill Peet by Bill Peet

I’m casually working my way through Bill Peet’s books, and this is what the library had available next. It’s ok, but there is a section that is so obnoxiously dated that it’s going back after only two readings. If my son hadn’t found it where I’d stashed it, it’d have only had one reading. 😉

Mrs Harkness and the PandaMrs. Harkness and the PandaMrs. Harkness and the Panda by Alicia Potter, illustrated by Melissa Sweet by Alicia Potter, illustrated by Melissa Sweet

I mentioned this in my post on the adult nonfiction title The Lady and the Panda, and I was pleasantly surprised at this kids’ version of her story. Obviously as it’s targeted at children it doesn’t have the depth (or the not-so-savory elements) as the other book, but it’s a cute book. Recommended if your library has a copy of it, but I wouldn’t go out of your way to buy it.

My Name is Not IsabellaMy Name Is Not Isabella: Just How Big Can a Little Girl Dream?My Name Is Not Isabella: Just How Big Can a Little Girl Dream? by Jennifer Fosberry, illustrated by Mike Litwin and Isabella: Star of the StoryIsabella: Star of the Story by Jennifer Fosberry, illustrated by Mike Litwin by Jennifer Fosberry, illustrated by Mike Litwin

My daughter’s picks, and I was underwhelmed. I like the idea behind these books, but the execution didn’t fully work for me. I thought Isabella was fairly obnoxious, and the concept are a bit beyond the age range that the illustrations and limited, repetitive text seems to target. These are hugely popular, so obviously they work for some people, but they were misses for me. They didn’t even keep my kids attention, and my daughter never asked to reread either one. Not recommended.

Hello Night Hola NocheHello Night/Hola NocheHello Night/Hola Noche Bilingual (Multilingual Edition) by Amy Costales, illustrated by Mercedes McDonald by Amy Costales, illustrated by Mercedes McDonald

My son is really interested in learning Spanish right now, so I grabbed this as it’s a bilingual text. He wasn’t interested in it at all though, and I’m not sure if it was the overall idea of it, or just this specific book. I’ll try again with another book later.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in May 2015)

Just like last month, we still didn’t have all that many new picture books that we finished this month.

Frogs Play CellosFrogs Play CellosFrogs Play Cellos (Did You Know?) by Laura Lyn DiSiena and Hannah Eliot, illustrated by Pete Oswald and Aaron Spurgeon by Laura Lyn DiSiena and Hannah Eliot, illustrated by Pete Oswald and Aaron Spurgeon

I think this would work better not as a true introduction to instruments but reinforcement for children who already know the names and concepts. We read it through once but my two were not interested in it at all. We’ll try it again another time.

Inside WeatherInside WeatherInside Weather (Inside Series) by Mary Kay Carson by Mary Kay Carson

My son’s pick, and it was quite timely, as we’re also reading a WeatherWeather (Usborne Beginners, Level 2) book for school. They go together quite nicely. The only thing I don’t like about this one is there are lots of fold-out pages that have me policing the use of the book more – they’d be easy to rip. This has more text than other books my son has tried to read on his own, but the layout keeps him from feeling overwhelmed, and he likes the information, so he’s stuck with it.

Air Is All Around YouAir Is All Around YouAir Is All Around You (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 1) by Franklyn Branley, illustrated by John O'Brien by Franklyn Branley, illustrated by John O’Brien

Read it once, and then I put it away in the library bag. It includes some simple experiments mentioned in the text, but “simple” does not always equal “easily doable with three small children,” and the way the information is presented means it’s hard to skip over it without having kids asking questions. “Why can’t we do that?” “Because I do not have the mental and physical energy to wrangle you two and the baby and anything involving water and food coloring, that’s why.”

Also, the illustrations were a little bit creepy to me. The eyes! So freaky!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in April 2015)

We didn’t have all that many new picture books that we finished this month. We’ve been reading more chapter books, and rereading old favorites, so the new picture book total is slim:

QuestQuestQuest by Aaron Becker by Aaron Becker

Becker’s the author of JourneyJourney by Aaron Becker (mentioned on the blog previously), and if you liked that one you’ll want to read Quest as well – it’s more of the same, in the very best way. I like hearing what the kids think is going on with each page. Wordless picture books took a little getting used to, but now I generally love them.

Angus and the DucksAngus and the DucksAngus and the Ducks by Marjorie Flack by Marjorie Flack

We may be relatively new to Flack, but I’m a huge fan of her work now. Love the illustrations in this one! My son loved it too – he asked for it to be repeated twice the first time we read it, and has continued to ask for it. A prime example of why there weren’t many new picture books finished this month. 😉

You Are the Best MedicineYou Are the Best MedicineYou Are the Best Medicine by Julie Aigner Clark, illustrations by Jana Christy by Julie Aigner Clark, illustrations by Jana Christy

My daughter’s pick from the library – she always goes for the ones with pink colors. And this one got a quick scan by me and then it went back into the library bag. No, nope, not gonna read it. But if you are looking for a cancer book, or just a book where a parent is sick – this might be one you want to check out.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in March 2015)

John Philip DuckJohn Philip DuckJohn Philip Duck by Patricia Polacco by Patricia Polacco

Really fun – we read this one dozens of times. The only thing I wish is that there was a note at the end with a little more detail as to what’s the real story, and what’s Polacco’s invention.

Math Fables TooMath Fables Too: Making Science CountMath Fables Too: Making Science Count by Greg Tang, illustrated by Taia Morley by Greg Tang, illustrated by Taia Morley

We’ve been on a kick as far as reading fun math books, and this was another winner in that string. Loved the little animal facts included in this one as well!

How Do You Know What Time It IsHow Do You Know What Time It Is?How Do You Know What Time It Is? by Robert E. Wells by Robert E. Wells

The Wells books have been very popular with my children, especially my son, and this was no exception.

DruthersDruthersDruthers by Matt Phelan by Matt Phelan

Unexpectedly delightful – this is a charming story with lovely illustrations. Both kids enjoyed it, but my daughter especially loved it.

Bear Snores OnBear Snores OnBear Snores On by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman

We’ve read two other Bear books, but this was our first time with the original title, and it was just as fun as I expected it would be. My daughter liked repeating the “bear snores on” line quite a bit.

Never Tease a WeaselNever Tease a WeaselNever Tease a Weasel by Jean Conder Soule, illustrated by George Booth by Jean Conder Soule, illustrated George Booth

I was more amused by this one than my kids were, especially my daughter who adamantly did NOT want me to read it again. It’s got some funny lines and vocabulary words, but I didn’t like the illustrations all that much.

Farmer Brown Goes Round and RoundFarmer Brown Goes Round and RoundFarmer Brown Goes Round and Round by Teri Sloat, illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcot by Teri Sloat, illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcot

This was ok. The kids were mildly entertained by the silliness, but I didn’t think it was worth repeating, and they didn’t ask for it again.

Because You Are My FriendBecause You Are My FriendBecause You Are My Friend by Guido Van Genechten by Guido Van Genechten

Another one picked out by my daughter because of the pink cover, another one that went right back into the library bag after one reading. In the “well at least it’s got that” aspect, the little bear has texture, so it becomes a touch-and-feel book for babies. There are better of those out there (much better), so don’t let that persuade you to give this one a try.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in February 2015)

Mommy Is a Soft Warm KissMommy Is a Soft, Warm KissMommy Is a Soft, Warm Kiss by Rhonda Gowler Greene, illustrated by Maggie Smith by Rhonda Gowler Greene, illustrated by Maggie Smith

Picked out by my daugher, and we read it every. day. until it “had” to go back to the library. Had to, because I didn’t try to renew it as I was tired of reading it. My love for it is not as strong as my daughter’s, who has already stated that she wants to get it again.

Pink Cupcake MagicPink Cupcake MagicPink Cupcake Magic by Katherine Tegen, illustrated by Kristin Verner by Katherine Tegen, illustrated by Kristin Verner

Also picked out my daughter (if there is a pink cover, she grabs it). Another one that will be going back to the library without being renewed. This one does keep her brother more entertained however, because of CUPCAKES!! And the big brother getting his reward at the end. 😉

CorduroyCorduroyCorduroy by Don Freeman by Don Freeman

Somehow we’d never read this classic before. Now we have, and both kids liked it. Neither of them requested it again though.

Sir Cumference and the First Round TableSir Cumference and the First Round TableSir Cumference and the First Round Table (A Math Adventure) by Cindy Neuschwander, illustrated by Wayne Geehan and Sir Cumference and the Dragon of PiSir Cumference and the Dragon of Pi (A Math Adventure) by Cindy Neuschwander, illustrated by Wayne Geehan by Cindy Neuschwander, illustrated by Wayne Geehan

I get a kick out of these math-themed books. The illustrations are wonderful too!

Green Lantern vs. the Meteor MonsterGreen Lantern vs. the Meteor Monster!Green Lantern vs. the Meteor Monster! (DC Super Friends)

This one is bad, but unfortunately it was one my son picked out. He does love his superheroes! I don’t mind the superhero books so much when he’s the one reading them, but this one isn’t one he can manage. It’ll go back to the library next time, as I hid it back into the library bag after only one reading – it’s just that bad.

Bedtime MathBedtime Math: A Fun Excuse to Stay Up LateBedtime Math: A Fun Excuse to Stay Up Late (Bedtime Math Series) by Laura Overdeck, illustrated by Jim Paillot by Laura Overdeck, illustrated by Jim Paillot

This is a work in progress, and my son loves it! We don’t read it at bedtime though. I like how it’s structured, and how there are different levels of problems – one of the levels always works for my son. Sometimes it’s the “wee ones” and sometimes it’s the next level up, but it’s fun.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!