What the Kids are Reading (in January 2015)

Lots of new library books, lots of books that just missed out on being super favorites. We spent a lot of time reading our own books though, so no worries when the library picks aren’t major hits.

The World According to Musk OxThe World According to Musk OxThe World According to Musk Ox by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers

We love the books A Is for Musk OxA Is for Musk Ox by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers, and Musk Ox CountsMusk Ox Counts by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers. This is another good one, but some of the humor is over my kids’ heads. (That’s perhaps a good thing, like when the musk ox is getting flirty.) The illustrations are fantastic, and I loved the “hysterical markers” for each continent. Lots of fun!

Naked Mole Rat Gets DressedNaked Mole Rat Gets DressedNaked Mole Rat Gets Dressed by Mo Willems by Mo Willems

Love Williems – I tend to just wander over to his shelf at the library and grab anything we haven’t already read. This one wasn’t one of our favorites however, and it went back to the library without regrets. I doubt we’ll borrow it again.

HogwashHogwash!Hogwash! by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jim McMullan by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jim McMullan

I’ve become a huge Karma Wilson fan, but like with the Willems title mentioned above, this wasn’t our favorite from her.

Bear Says ThanksBear Says ThanksBear Says Thanks (The Bear Books) by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman

See above, about Karma Wilson. This one is a little late for Thanksgiving, but that’s ok – it’s still a great book.

DragonsDragons (Mythical Creatures)Dragons (Mythical Creatures) by Charlotte Guillain by Charlotte Guillain

My daughter requested a book on dragons, as we drove in to the library. I had no time to go searching for picture books featuring dragons, so instead I went to the nonfiction area. Yes, nonfiction about dragons – it does exist!
For general interest though, I think she’d have preferred a regular picture book. This one didn’t keep her attention.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in December 2014)

No surprise, we’ve been reading lots of Christmas books. We have managed to read a few other titles as well though, besides the holiday-themed ones. I already mentioned some of the books in our literary advent, but two of the ones that have been the biggest hits I didn’t mention. So I’ll do that here. ๐Ÿ™‚

Mortimer's Christmas MangerMortimer’s Christmas MangerMortimer's Christmas Manger by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman

I showed this one on Instagram, because I was so pleasantly surprised by it – my kids loved it, and it had a lot more depth than I thought it was going to have based on the cover. I got it from the library, but I think I need to add it to our collection.

Bear Stays up for ChristmasBear Stays Up for ChristmasBear Stays Up for Christmas (The Bear Books) by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman

Another library book, another one I think we need to get for ourselves. Super cute, and both kids loved it.

PinkaliciousPinkalicious: The Pinkamazing Storybook CollectionPinkalicious: The Pinkamazing Storybook Collection by Victoria Kann by Victoria Kann

My daughter picked this one out, entirely based on the cover. Kudos to the artist – you know how to appeal to my girl! While I got a little tired of the made-up “pink” words in the text, overall it didn’t bother me anywhere near as much as I feared it might. Most of the books my kids select based on the covers don’t live up to even my low expectations, so yay for one that does. That’s not really saying much though, and it’s not one I recommend, or will miss when it goes back to the library. ๐Ÿ™‚

0-439-45948-610 Fat Turkeys10 Fat Turkeys by Tony Johnston, illustrated by Rich Deas by Tony Johnston, illustrated by Rich Deas

My son’s pick. A couple of the rhymes were clunky, but both kids liked counting down along with the story, and read it happily multiple times before I got tired of it and stashed it back into the library bag for our next trip. Yes, I do that.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in November 2014)

Recently it’s been almost all about the science books and/or Dr. Seuss for our library book reading. We still repeat our favorites that we own, but for new material we’ve had a heavy rotation of:

I Can Name 50 Trees TodayI Can Name 50 Trees Today!I Can Name 50 Trees Today!: All About Trees (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library) by Bonnie Worth, illustrated by Aristides Ruiz and Joe Mathieu by Bonnie Worth, illustrated by Aristides Ruiz and Joe Mathieu.

A Cat in the Hat Learning Library Title, and I’ll be looking for more of them. It’s got lots of info, but in a fun style that keeps the kids listening, and keeps me reading happily.

Why Oh Why Are Deserts DryWhy Oh Why Are Deserts Dry?Why Oh Why Are Deserts Dry?: All About Deserts (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library) by Tish Rabe, illustrated by Aristides Ruiz and Joe Mathieu by Tish Rabe, illustrated by Aristides Ruiz and Joe Mathieu

Another Cat in the Hat Learning Library book. This series has been a good discovery for us, and I’m thrilled to see how many titles have been published (and are available through our library). They seem perfect for G’s age (5) and interest level as well.

The Wild Leaf RideThe Wild Leaf RideThe Wild Leaf Ride (Magic School Bus, Scholastic Reader, Level 2) by Judith Stamper, illustrated by Carolyn Bracken by Judith Stamper, illustrated by Carolyn Bracken.

Both kids love this one, which is part of The Magic School Bus series. I kind of hate it – after a half dozen times through it I was ready to hide it until it could go back. Fortunately it’s an early reader type book, and my son isn’t far away from being able to read it himself. I’ll look for another one in the series after he gets a bit farther along in his reading lessons and see if he can handle it all on his own, so I don’t have to repeat these titles.

Hop on PopHop on Pop (I Can Read It All By Myself)Hop on Pop  (I Can Read It All By Myself) by Dr Seuss by Dr Seuss.

Read by G with very minimal help (as in, only a couple of words – mother/father/sister/brother tripped him up, and maybe something else I’m forgetting).

We did also read two picture books:
Pumpkin BabyPumpkin BabyPumpkin Baby by Jane Yolen, illustrated by Susan Mitchell by Jane Yolen, illustrated by Susan Mitchell

Usually I like Yolen’s books, but didn’t care for this one, and I whisked it away before the kids could ask for it repeatedly. The language wasn’t as easy to read aloud as it typically is for her works.

What's in the Egg Little PipWhat’s in the Egg, Little Pip?What's in the Egg, Little Pip? by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman

I didn’t realize what either of the picture book titles were about when I brought them home, and was amused that they both dealt with new babies coming into the family and the big sister’s feelings about that. How appropriate for us right now, although I could have used the Little Pip title even earlier – this one would work during a pregnancy that might be keeping mom from playing in the same ways as before. Great illustrations and very readable – I’ll look for more Little Pip titles, and other books by the author.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in October 2014)

Not a lot of new-to-us books recently; most of the books we’ve been reading have been old favorites. We did still manage a few new titles though:

Moonshot The Flight of Apollo 11Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca by Brian Floca

I thought G would be more into this than he was – he has loved some of Floca’s other books, and he loves outer space related titles, but this one wasn’t a favorite. It’s probably just a bit too old for him, so I’ll give it another try at a later date.

Tweak TweakTweak TweakTweak Tweak by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier

H especially loves this one, but G doesn’t mind listening to it as well. It’s very cute, with charming illustrations. I don’t think it’ll be one that H continues to ask for again and again, but that just makes it a perfect library book.

Hana in the Time of the TulipsHana in the Time of the TulipsHana in the Time of the Tulips by Deborah Noyes, illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline by Deborah Noyes, illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline

The illustrations are beautiful, but the storyline doesn’t keep their interest. I think it’d be a better choice for older kids, even if it is a picture book.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in July 2014)

AlmostAlmostAlmost by Richard Torrey by Richard Torrey
Especially well-timed as we first read it days before my son’s birthday. So even though the age was off by a year, it still connected with him in a bigger way than I expected.

Randy Riley's Really Big HitRandy Riley’s Really Big HitRandy Riley's Really Big Hit by Chris Van Dusen by Chris Van Dusen
Baseball + outer space + robots = the perfect book for my boy. At least this month. We have read it countless times already. One of the unexpectedly fun parts was that Randy Riley has a telescope, and every time we read the book G would sigh “I wish I had a telescope.” And then it was his birthday and he got a telescope. ๐Ÿ™‚

Sleep Like a TigerSleep Like a TigerSleep Like a Tiger (Caldecott Medal - Honors Winning Title) by Mary Logue, illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski by Mary Logue, illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski

H loves this one especially, and asks for it to be read every time we sit down on the couch together.

This is Not My HatThis Is Not My HatThis Is Not My Hat by Jon Klassen by Jon Klassen

Makes them both laugh, and they love the expressions on the big fish.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in June 2014)

The overall theme of this month’s reading has been “SPACE.” But there’s been some other topics too:

Dinosaur KissesDinosaur KissesDinosaur Kisses by David Ezra Stein by David Ezra Stein

My kids LOVE this book. LOVE LOVE LOVE. What’s not to love, from their point of view? There is WHOMPing and STOMPing and CHOMPing.

Digger Dozer DumperDigger, Dozer, DumperDigger, Dozer, Dumper by Hope Vestergaard, illustrations by David Slonim by Hope Vestergaard, illustrations by David Slonim

Not quite as good as Goodnight, Goodnight Construction SiteGoodnight, Goodnight Construction Site by Sherri Duskey Rinker, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld, but a solid choice for machine-loving little ones.

Let's Go for a DriveLet’s Go for a Drive!Let's Go for a Drive! (An Elephant and Piggie Book) by Mo Willems / Today I Will Fly!Today I Will Fly! (An Elephant and Piggie Book) by Mo Willems by Mo Willems

So much love by my children for these two. Elephant and Piggie are big hits.

DK Eyewitness Astronomy
DK Eyewitness Books: AstronomyDK Eyewitness Books: Astronomy

Eh, not the right fit. G prefers solar system and planet info to astronomy, and this one had a bunch of details about the history of astronomy, and lots of artifacts relating to it.

The Solar SystemThe Solar System (Early Bird Astronomy)The Solar System (Early Bird Astronomy) by Laura Hamilton Waxman

His favorite of all the space books I brought home the last trip. There are other titles in this Early Bird Astronomy series, and I may try some of those as well for him.

SpaceSpaceSpace (Kingfisher Readers. Level 5) by James Harrison by James Harrison

Simplified explanations of things make it a great intro book. This is meant as a reader, but for kids reading fluently. We’re just using it as a readaloud, because G is nowhere close to reading on this level.

Scholastic Atlas of SpaceScholastic Atlas Of SpaceScholastic Atlas Of Space

He likes some of the pictures, but it’s not as engaging as I expected it to be for him.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in May 2014)

Musk Ox CountsMusk Ox CountsMusk Ox Counts by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers

Last library visit I brought the kids inside with me (lots of the time I leave them in the car with daddy while I run in and get my holds), and they picked out most of their own books.

It’s not that I don’t want to encourage them in the joy of the library or deny them the pleasure of selecting books for themselves, but so much of the time the books they pick aren’t ones they end up liking that much. They turn into read once and that’s enough books, instead of the over and over and over again repeats that I try to find.

Anyway, that’s a long introduction to say that this month’s library trip didn’t have many winners. I did snag another book by the pair who wrote and illustrated the fantastic A Is for Musk OxA Is for Musk Ox by Erin Cabatingan and Matthew Myers, and it was easily the best book of the bunch. Ok, it was the only book that I could bear to re-read, but it would have been a lot of fun even with tougher competition.

Other than that one, this month has been lots of rereads from our own collection. I’ve got some other kids’ books on hold so hopefully next month’s post has more to report!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in April 2014)

Here’s what I’ve been reading to the kids in April:

JourneyJourneyJourney by Aaron Becker by Aaron Becker
A wordless picture book, and my kids LOVED it. It’s very reminiscent of Harold and the Purple CrayonHarold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson, although the illustration style is completely different.

LocomotiveLocomotive Locomotive by Brian Floca by Brian Floca
Beautiful illustrations, and packed with text. I wasn’t sure if my youngest would stay interested in the entire book, but she did. Highly recommended for young train fans, if it’s somehow slipped your notice (as a Caldecott winner, that seems unlikely)

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant SunflowersHow to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy StepsHow to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers by Mordicai Gerstein by Mordicai Gerstein
Very funny in a silly way, and while the kids liked it well enough while reading it the first time, they’ve never requested it again. I would have expected my son to want to hear it again, but he’s been much more interested in the JourneyJourney by Aaron Becker book mentioned above.

Ben Rides OnBen Rides OnBen Rides On by Matt Davies by Matt Davies
A gentle introduction to bullies, if that doesn’t sound completely contradictory. My son liked it a lot.

Have You Seen My New Blue SocksHave You Seen My New Blue Socks?Have You Seen My New Blue Socks? by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier
My daughter especially enjoyed this one. It’s a very quick, very cute read, with lots of simple rhymes that encouraged my kids to guess the sentence ending.

Awesome Snacks and AppetizersAwesome Snacks and AppetizersAwesome Snacks and Appeti/zers (You're the Chef series) by Kari Cornell by Kari Cornell
Very simple ideas and recipes, but this is an excellent introduction to following a recipe and cooking for younger children. My son has already selected one he wants to try, and if I would ever remember to buy the ingredients we need for it, we will.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in March 2014)

One book that I picked up before our long road trip, and several beginning readers for G:

LaRue Across America: Postcards from the Vacation by Mark TeagueLaRue Across America: Postcards From the VacationLaRue Across America: Postcards From the Vacation by Mark Teague by Mark Teague
They were not impressed by this story, but H loved flipping through the pages, so it wasn’t a total dud. A lot of the humor was geared more towards older audiences, although the story line itself about the dog and the cats going on a road trip works for younger children.

Let's Go For a DriveLet’s Go for a Drive! (An Elephant and Piggie Book)Let's Go for a Drive! (An Elephant and Piggie Book) by Mo Willems by Mo Willems
So cute, and one of the best easy reader ones we’ve found. Since it’s Mo Willems, so this doesn’t surprise me (love him!). We’ll be trying some of the other Elephant and Piggie books as well.

Sunshine MoonshineSunshine, Moonshine Sunshine, Moonshine (Step-Into-Reading, Step 1) by Jennifer Armstrong by Jennifer Armstrong
Lots of repetition helps G read/”read” this early reader. That’s about all it has going for it (yes, I’m picky about kids’ books.)

One Fish Two FishOne Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (I Can Read It All by Myself)One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (I Can Read It All by Myself) by Dr. Seuss by Dr. Seuss
Another beginner book, but so much more interesting, both visually and story-wise. G rarely gets all the way through it though; usually he has had enough about 2/3 of the way through.

Green Eggs and Ham by Dr SeussGreen Eggs and HamGreen Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss by Dr. Seuss
And still another beginner book, of about the same popularity with G as the Fish book, although we usually finish this one. He still prefers Willems’ book, and I’ll be looking for more of the Elephant and Piggie books.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in February 2014)

The last round of library books I brought home for my kids weren’t that popular with them, so most of what we’ve been reading have been our old favorites from our own bookshelves. I’m hoping my memory & searching hasn’t failed me, but I’ve tried to list some new-to-the-blog ones we’ve been enjoying:

George and the DragonGeorge and the DragonGeorge and the Dragon by Chris Wormell by Chris Wormell

I have no idea why this didn’t make it on our Favorite Picture Books list, because it definitely should have. A brain freeze that made me forget it? Both kids love it, and both have memorized huge portions of the text. The fact that they get to roar like a dragon during the recitation is a huge bonus.

Little Blue TruckLittle Blue Truck Board BookLittle Blue Truck by Alice Schertle illustrated by Jill McElmurry by Alice Schertle; illustrated by Jill McElmurry

If I was rewriting the Favorite Board Books post, this one would make it. A gift from grandma, they love the pictures, and the fun rhymes, and the opportunity to make so many fun barnyard animal sounds. Plus honk like a dump truck.

Little PookieLittle PookieLittle Pookie by Sandra Boynton by Sandra Boynton

Really, any of the Little Pookie books, but this one has the fun line about wearing daddy’s shirt, which is hi-lar-i-ous to my two.

Machines at WorkMachines at Work Board BookMachines at Work  by Byron Barton by Byron Barton

I can’t remember if it was Anne or Jessica who gave me the heads-up on this one, but my son loved it for the longest time. Now he’s liking trying to read the words of it, so the appeal has continued somewhat.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!