Audrey of the Outback by Christine Harris

Audrey of the OutbackAudrey of the Outback by Christine Harris, illustrated by Ann James

The book we should have selected for our Family Book Club (except we didn’t discover it in time). This find is thanks to Give Your Child The World, and it’s such a fun book. I’m going to be doing a round-the-world kindergarten theme with my daughter this year, and this is on my list now to read to her when we reach Australia in our schedule.

Audrey reminded me a bit of Ramona Quimby, and then writing this review I see the publisher’s description compares her to both Ramona and Pippi Longstocking. I always love it when I see someone else agrees with my comparisons. 🙂

Audrey is not quite as … troublesome as Ramona (I can’t compare her to Pippi, as it’s been too long since I read that book) but she’s curious and adventurous and it’s easy to imagine her as a Ramona if she was being raised in that time and place. And vice versa.

There’s a glossary of unfamiliar terms in the back of the book, although they were all easy to figure out from the context of the story. While there are hints of the challenges of living in the Outback in the 1930s, overall the tone is gentle enough that I wouldn’t hesitate to read it to younger children. Each chapter is fairly short as well, and I think it’d make for an good early chapter book if you’re new to reading those aloud.

There are two more Audrey books, and happily for me my library has them all. Highly recommended for early elementary age as a readaloud – it was a delightful story.

This is the first book in a series, and is followed by Audrey Goes to Town and Audrey’s Big Secret. All three can also be purchased in combined volume for Kindle or Nook, although I’m not sure how well the illustrations translate in an electronic format. They’re not essential to the story, but they are very sweet.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Audrey is a 1930s outback girl with a lot on her mind. Her dad has gone away to work; her brother Price thinks he’s too old for games; and little Dougie likes pretending to be a bird. So together with her best friend Stumpy, Audrey ponders some of life’s big questions—like whether being a swaggie (or bush traveler, as explained in the handy glossary) is lonelier than being a girl, and whether it’s better to be a sheep or a cow. Determined, mischievous, imaginative, and inquisitive, Audrey is Australia’s response to Pippi Longstocking and Ramona Quimby.

Book Details

Title: Audrey of the Outback
Author: Christine Harris, illustrated by Ann James
Category: Juvenile fiction

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Pirate Hunters by Robert Kurson
Two years ago: July 2014 Recap

Reading Around the World: Week 2 – Africa

Give Your Child the World Week 2 AfricaContinuing on with Jamie Martin and Sarah Mackenzie’s children’s book club, although I’m quite behind their official schedule.

Week two is coordinated with the chapter on Africa from Martin’s fantastic book Give Your Child The World.

This week I read the following titles with my kids:

Lala SalamaLala Salama: A Tanzanian Lullaby by Patricia Maclachlan, illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon
Beautiful illustrations, and a soft and gentle story that’s perfect for bedtime.

Elephants of AfricaElephants of Africa by Gail Gibbons
Informative nonfiction title – my older two weren’t that interested in it but the youngest liked making elephant noises for every page.

Anansi and the Moss-Covered RockAnansi and the Moss-Covered Rock retold by Eric A. Kimmel, illustrated by Janet Stevens
Generally I don’t like folktales (from any culture) so I wasn’t feeling enthusiastic about starting this title, but it was a lot of fun.

Rain SchoolRain School by James Mumford
Great story, and I’m not sure I’ve ever read a book set in Chad before, so that was nice.

Jambo Means HelloJambo Means Hello: Swahili Alphabet Book by Muriel Feelings, illustrated by Tom Feelings
We skimmed this one mostly, but the illustrations are wonderful.

Bringing the Rain to Kapiti PlainBringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain: A Nandi Tale by Verna Aardema, illustrated by Beatriz Vidal
My oldest had wandered off when we read this one, but I hope to get him to listen to it later – I’m curious to see if he recognizes the structure of it being like “This is the House That Jack Built”

Throw Your Tooth on the RoofWe also read Throw Your Tooth on the Roof: Tooth Traditions from Around the World by Selby Beeler, illustrated by G. Brian Karas, although that really would have been a better fit with week 1, as a multicultural book. My kids got a little bit bored with it, and we just kind of dipped into it here and there, mostly seeing how many cultures were mentioned having tooth traditions involving 1) mice 2)throwing the tooth on the roof or 3) burying the tooth.

Anna HibiscusAnd I was somewhat hoping to get to it this week but it didn’t happen. Later this year though we will be reading Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke, as it is *such* a great book. It’s not a picture book though, which is all we managed this week. 🙂

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Two years ago: Read This, Not That: Fair Play Mystery

Counting By 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Counting by 7sCounting By 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Poignant story about a twelve-year-old genius whose adoptive parents are unexpectedly killed in a car crash, leaving her completely alone in the world. While that may have the possibility of being a heart-wrenching story, overall the tone is hopeful, and not as emotionally wrenching as it could have been.

My biggest criticism of the book relates to the ending, so I’ll hide it in the next paragraph. If you’re not opposed to being somewhat spoiled, highlight the text block:

The ending is probably too unrealistically happy, but it’s satisfying and considering the target age range for readers, I can’t really complain too much. There’s plenty of time for middle grade readers to get more realistic conclusions to novels, and the wrap-it-all-up-in-a-bow aspect of it did make me happy for Willow. And yes, I just admitted to feeling happy for a fictional character.

I loved Willow as a character – she’s delightfully odd. I loved Mai and Pattie and how they take charge of Willow, and get Dell to do what they need and want. There’s a few too many happy coincidences throughout the book, but I can forgive it because I liked the characters so much.

Heartwarming and uplifting, I really enjoyed it.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
In the tradition of Out of My Mind, Wonder, and Mockingbird, this is an intensely moving middle grade novel about being an outsider, coping with loss, and discovering the true meaning of family.

Willow Chance is a twelve-year-old genius, obsessed with nature and diagnosing medical conditions, who finds it comforting to count by 7s. It has never been easy for her to connect with anyone other than her adoptive parents, but that hasn’t kept her from leading a quietly happy life… until now.

Suddenly Willow’s world is tragically changed when her parents both die in a car crash, leaving her alone in a baffling world. The triumph of this book is that it is not a tragedy. This extraordinarily odd, but extraordinarily endearing, girl manages to push through her grief. Her journey to find a fascinatingly diverse and fully believable surrogate family is a joy and a revelation to read.

Book Details

Title: Counting By 7s
Author: Holly Goldberg Sloan
Category: Middle Grade Fiction
My Rating: 4 Stars

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: 12 Sports Books to Read if You Liked “The Boys in the Boat”

50 Picture Books about Australia

On Monday I shared the books we’ll “officially” be reading as part of our Family Book Club. But perhaps your library doesn’t have Mem Fox’s Possum Magic, or perhaps you just want one or two dozen others to read because your kids are like mine and can’t get enough picture books. In that case, I’ve compiled a list of 50 possibilities for you.

50 Australia picture books

Headed to the library? I’ve got a printable for that.

If you want to look for any of these titles at your library, here’s a PDF printable of all 50 books.

And some others, which I didn’t have the chance to preview:

Still Want More?

Despite including several titles by Mem Fox already in this list, she’s got plenty more – not all of them very Australia-heavy on their content, but every one of hers I’ve read has been worthwhile. My kids are particularly partial to Where Is the Green Sheep?

In addition, Bronwyn Bancroft has many additional picture book titles besides the three listed in this post, and all are very Australia-focused.

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Searching for Sunday by Rachel Held Evans

Shadow Spinner (and a link-up)

Shadow SpinnerMay kicks off a new theme for our family book club – Iran – and the first book is Shadow Spinner, a retelling of the Shahrazad story by Susan Fletcher.

Once again, it’s not one that I read to my kids (they’re too young for it), but I reread it to be able to participate in the discussion in the Facebook group. Although I didn’t actually participate in the discussion at all, as most of it took place when I was on vacation and not spending time on Facebook. 🙂

Jessica (Quirky Bookworm) shared in the Facebook group that there is a new retelling of Shahrazad’s story, called The Wrath and the Dawn, and I’ve already requested it from the library. I did like how Fletcher made me think about what it would really have been like in that situation for everyone, and am curious to read Ahdieh’s interpretation.

If you read Shadow Spinner, either for yourself, or with your family, what did you think of it? Were you familiar with Shahrazad’s story, and did that impact your feelings about this reinterpretation?

If you’ve written a post about the book (or other books related to Iran). Any posts linked here will show up on the joint linkup, hosted by Katie (Cakes, Tea and Dreams) and Jessica (Quirky Bookworm). Add your post once from any one of our sites, and it will automatically appear in the linkup on their blogs.


RTFEBC Iran Books

Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share a post about reading this book or one of the themed picture books. Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to one of the host’s posts.

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting us permission to use and/or repost photographs or comments from your linked post.

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Recent Readaloud: Owls in the Family

Owls in the FamilyOwls in the Family by Farley Mowat

One of G’s school books, and I’ve heard about this title before, but had never read it. I’m so glad it was included in the curriculum, because it was such a enjoyable read, and worked really well as a readaloud!

Listeners who are sensitive may be troubled by some scenes, and it is a bit dated (it was published originally in 1961), but my 4 & 6 year olds had no trouble with it.

My verdict:

Charming story about a boy who has two owls as pets. I was sad to reach the end of it, and have looked for additional titles by Mowat.

The kids’ verdict:
They both really enjoyed it. I think both kids were intrigued (and a bit jealous) of the freedom the boys in the story had.

Publisher’s Description:
Farley Mowat’s funniest book tells the adventures of Wol and Weeps, two owls from Saskatchewan who shape up a whole neighbourhood, turn a house topsy-turvy, and outsmart Mutt, the dog hero of The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be. Wol brings dead skunks to the family dinner table and terrorizes the minister, the postman, and the French teacher. Weeps is a comical bird, afraid of everything except Mutt, and he never does learn how to fly. Here is the heartwarming story of how a boy named Billy finds Wol and Weeps and unwittingly adds two new members to the family.

Book Details

Title: Owls in the Family
Author: Farley Mowat
Category: Children’s Nonfiction
My Rating: 4 Stars

Find the book: Print | Goodreads

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: The Lady and the Panda

Reading about Iran

Interested in joining in with us for the Reading Together: A Family Exploration Book Club? Our theme for May and June is Iran, and you’ve still got time to find the books and join our new co-host Katie from Cakes, Tea, and Dreams for the discussion.

RTFEBC Iran Books

What are the three books we’ve selected? The picture book is Forty Fortunes by Aaron Shepard, illustrated by Alisher Dianov. (Can’t find it? I’ll list some other suggestions below). The elementary grade book to be discussed in May is Shadow Spinner by Susan Fletcher, and the middle grade / teen book for June is Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.

Want some additional picture book options?

If your kids are anything like mine, you can run through a half dozen picture books in a day, and they like nothing more than doing just that. In case you can’t easily locate Forty Fortunes, or if you just want more options, here are some more possibilities. Asterisks (*) mark ones I especially enjoyed, and the tilde (~) denotes one I haven’t actually seen, thanks to it vanishing off my library holds shelf before I could borrow it.

Chat about the books

We’d love to chat about the books with you in the Facebook group – tell us what you & your family think about the titles, or share additional ideas for books (or crafts, or food) that connect to the theme!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Savor by Shauna Niequist

When My Name Was Keoko (and a linkup)

When My Name Was KeokoApril continued with the theme of Korea for our family book club, and the book selection is a favorite of mine: When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park, by Linda Sue Park.

Because of the ages of my children (my oldest is only 6), it’s not one I read aloud to them, but I do plan on either having them read it themselves eventually, or reading it to them when they’re older.

I’m reasonably well-read about World War II and that era, but I hadn’t realized that Korea was occupied by Japan before and during the war. Or at least if I’d heard it it hadn’t really sunk in at all. Park’s story brings that time period to life, and yet does so in a way that’s not too graphic for younger readers, although as always I’d recommend that you know your reader if you’re worried about suitability.

If you read When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park, either for yourself, or with your family, what did you think of it? There’s also a blog linkup if you posted about the book (or theme), and any posts will automatically show up on the joint linkup, hosted by Moira (Hearth and Homefront) and Jessica (Quirky Bookworm). Add your post once from any one of our sites, and it will automatically appear in the linkup on their blogs.


RTFEBC Korea

Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share a post about reading this book or one of the themed picture books. Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to one of the host’s posts.

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting us permission to use and/or repost photographs or comments from your linked post.

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

The Kite Fighters (and a linkup)

The Kite FightersMarch and April’s theme for our online family book club is Korea, and March’s book is Linda Sue Park’s wonderful novel The Kite FightersThe Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park.

I was not new to Park, but hadn’t read this particular title until pre-reading it for the book club. What a lovely story it was, and I learned quite a bit about historic Korean culture.

While I did not read this book with my kids (I think they’ll do better with it in another couple of years), I absolutely do plan to read it to them eventually. Although if we stick with Sonlight for our homeschool curriculum, it is scheduled in the year focused on the Eastern Hemisphere, so the kids would definitely read it then!


If you read The Kite FightersThe Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park, either for yourself, or with your family, what did you think of it? And if you wrote a post about it, please add it to our linkup! Any posts will automatically show up on the joint linkup, hosted by Moira (Hearth and Homefront) and Jessica (Quirky Bookworm). Add your post once from any one of our sites, and it will automatically appear in the linkup on their blogs.


RTFEBC Korea

Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share a post about reading this book or one of the themed picture books. Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to one of the host’s posts.

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting us permission to use and/or repost photographs or comments from your linked post.

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Next month we continue with Korea, and we’ll be discussing When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park. I hope you can join us!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park

A Single ShardA Single ShardA Single Shard by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

I read this when I was pre-reading/re-reading books for the family book club’s Korea theme. Ultimately I recommended we select When My Name Was Keoko as the middle grade/teen book, feeling that it gave a better balance to our pairing, but want to still encourage anyone interested in children’s literature or historical fiction to give this one a try – it’s fantastic.

Park’s writing is so beautiful, but the characterizations and themes of her novel are what make A Single Shard such a standout to me. While it’s not the right fit for me to read to my children (yet), I’m looking forward to introducing them to it when they’re older and able to appreciate the story.

And if you’re able to read the book and not feel an overwhelming urge to do some searching online for celadon pottery, you’ve got more restraint than I do. I had to go looking for some images of the pottery described in the book – such beautiful work!

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
In this Newbery Medal-winning book set in 12th century Korea, Tree-ear, a 13-year-old orphan, lives under a bridge in Ch’ulp’o, a potters’ village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potter’s craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday. When Min takes Tree-ear on as his helper, Tree-ear is elated — until he finds obstacles in his path: the backbreaking labor of digging and hauling clay, Min’s irascible temper, and his own ignorance. But Tree-ear is determined to prove himself — even if it means taking a long, solitary journey on foot to present Min’s work in the hope of a royal commission . . . even if it means arriving at the royal court with nothing to show but a single celadon shard.

Book Details

Title: A Single ShardA Single Shard by Linda Sue Park
Author: Linda Sue Park
Category: Juvenile Fiction
My Rating: 4.5 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!