Books for Strengthening My Faith and Teaching My Children

Books to Strengthen My Faith and Teach My Children about JesusYesterday I highlighted some of the cookbooks, menu plans, and other kitchen resources found in the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle. Today I’m mentioning the faith-related resources it includes – all of them, because they’re all wonderful!

(And if you’re wondering, yes, I bought a bundle for myself – so I’ve skimmed all of the books, and am excited to dive into them all more carefully.)

Faith Resources For Me

Abide Because It's the Secret to ThrivingAbide: Because It’s the Secret to Thriving by Elisa Pulliam

I used to have a well-established quiet time routine. And then I had kids. 😉 After adding each child to the family getting back into the quiet time routine has been something I’ve had to work at. I still don’t have it down again after baby #3, and I’m going to try to work through this book to get back into the habit. Ten days – I can do this.

Life GiverLife Giver by Lara Williams

I love Lara Williams’ Bible Studies, and this is no exception. Four weeks, so it’s an easily manageable length, and on a great topic – I can’t wait to dive into this.

Live for HimLive for Him: A Grace-Filled Look at Planning by Leigh Ann Dutton

I love planning. Love love love it. This is a great (brief) guide to planning. It’s got just enough detail to help you during your planning session, without so much extraneous fluff that wastes your time. There are also lots of helpful printables at the end of it, including a Bible reading plan with a different setup than others I’ve seen – I liked it quite a bit! It also has enough color to make it pretty, but not so much that I hate printing it and using up all my color ink.

Strengthening the Heart of a HomemakerStrengthening the Heart of a Homemaker: A Devotional Guide for Your Homemaking Journey by Kristen Smith

A nice collection of scriptures thematically arranged by homemaking topic. There are 52 verses, and printable scripture cards for them all. The additional content is fairly thin though.

Trust without BordersTrust Without Borders: A 40-Day Devotional Journey to Deepen, Strengthen, and Stretch Your Faith in GodTrust Without Borders: A 40-Day Devotional Journey to  Deepen, Strengthen, and Stretch Your Faith in God by Arabah Joy by Arabah Joy

I skimmed all of the books mentioned today, so I could share about them. Except as soon as I started reading the introduction to this one, I was pulled into it and didn’t stop until I was halfway through it. It’s really engaging and thought-provoking, and I’m looking forward to getting back to it to give it the focus it deserves.

Faith Resources To Use With My Children

31 Ways to Bless Kids with Bold FaithBlessing Kids with Bold Faith: 31 Ways to Equip Kids by Melinda Means & Kathy Helgemo

31 inspiring ideas, many of which will work with all ages (my kids are still a little young for some of them, but we’ll be there soon enough). Even if my children’s aren’t old enough for some of these suggestions to apply, I enjoyed reading it and appreciated the push to think about what I can do now, and what I want to do later.

Discipleship a Character Curriculum Using ScriptureDiscipleship: A Character Curriculum Using Scripture by Dollie Freeman

This is an extensive resource on character training, using verses directly from the Bible. It can work with children of almost all ages – from basic copywork with younger ones, to a Bible Study and Prayer Journal for older ones. It could even work with pre-writers as memory work. It’s even got an assignement schedule to use it as a curriculum – one, two, or three-year plans of 36 weeks each.

(The only thing I don’t love about it? All the verses are KJV, and I prefer the ESV. It’s still a fabulous resource, and one I can adapt easily enough to use our preferred translation.)

How to Introduce Your Child to JesusHow to Introduce Your Child to Jesus by Jessica Smartt

This is packed with practical, easy-to-follow steps, and it’s also got a great resource list (you know I love books, and book lists.) My favorite part (besides those resource lists) is the chapter on making your child’s faith personal – with ideas on how to do that based on your child’s personality. Tailoring those teachable moments to my individual child, with ideas for what that looks like? Thank you!

The Busy Mom's Guide to Teaching CharacterThe Busy Mom’s Guide to Teaching Character by Jenn Thorson

Lots of good information (and a great reminder of the why to teach character starts the book). You’ll want internet access to take advantage of the linked articles she points back to from her blog. Also included are 20 printable scripture character prayer cards. There is an extensive list of suggested resources at the end, which is fantastic.


Sound good? Individually these books would sell for over $50, but right now they’re part of the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle, a collection of eBooks, eCourses, audios, online conferences, and printable packs.

Instead of paying that $57 for these titles, you can buy the bundle and get them all for $29.97, plus a whole lot more (like those resources mentioned yesterday!)

And the bundle includes FREE 65 Tyndale Rewards Points to Be Used for a FREE Book or Towards Any Book of Your Choice ($15 Value). 65 Points is enough to get the book Amazing Adventures, Creative Connections, and Daring Deeds by Tim and Alison Simpson, or there are lots of others that caught my eye.

But don’t wait! The Ultimate Homemaking Bundle will only be available from 8:00 a.m. EST on Monday, April 20 until 11:59 p.m. EST on Monday, April 27.Click here for more info or to buy now.

Read the fine print about this bundle and read the answers to frequently asked questions about the bundle.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means that, at no additional cost to you, I may earn a small commission if you purchase a bundle using my link. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Finding Spiritual Whitespace

Finding Spiritual WhitespaceFinding Spiritual Whitespace: Awakening Your Soul to RestFinding Spiritual Whitespace: Awakening Your Soul to Rest by Bonnie Gray by Bonnie Gray

I’ve been sitting on this review for ages, because I wanted to like this book. I liked the idea of it quite a bit, and I liked getting to know the author through the story she shared in the book. Her writing is compelling and engaging, and it’s easy to root for her as she works through her traumatic upbringing.

Despite all of that, I didn’t care for the book all that much. Most reviewers seem to adore it, so I recognize that I’m in the minority here, but it felt like two books in one, and that dual structure didn’t work for me. It’s a book about creating whitespace in your life, but it’s also (mostly) a book about Gray writing a book about creating whitespace while dealing with panic attacks brought on by PTSD. I’d happily read a memoir if Gray ever writes one, and I’d probably read another book by her on rest/whitespace/breathing room. This mish-mash of the two caused them both to suffer from neglect and a meandering theme which ultimately resulted in a disappointing read. [Read more…]

Quick Lit February 2015

We’ll just call this a clear-out of some books from 2014 that never got mentioned. Plus some more recent reads. 🙂

Tasting the SeasonsTasting the Seasons: Inspired, In-Season Cuisine Thats Easy, Healthy, Fresh and FunTasting the Seasons: Inspired, In-Season Cuisine Thats Easy, Healthy, Fresh and Fun by Kerry Dunnington by Kerry Dunnington

Has some very intriguing recipes, but the book is crying out for photographs. There are a few recipes that call for specialty ingredients, but there is a source list in the back. I hope to do a “Cooking the Book” feature with this one soon.

Everythign I Need to Know I Learned From a Little Golden BookEverything I Need To Know I Learned From a Little Golden BookEverything I Need To Know I Learned From a Little Golden Book by Diane Muldrow by Diane Muldrow

This was a gift, and it’s very cute. If you’ve read many Little Golden books, it’s more fun than if you’re looking at it and are unfamiliar with the source material.

The Best Homemade Kids' Lunches on the PlanetThe Best Homemade Kids’ Lunches on the Planet: Make Lunches Your Kids Will Love with More Than 200 Deliciously Nutritious Meal IdeasThe Best Homemade Kids' Lunches on the Planet: Make Lunches Your Kids Will Love with More Than 200 Deliciously Nutritious Meal Ideas by Laura Fuentes by Laura Fuentes

Was hoping for some ideas to get out of the lunch rut we’ve fallen into, and I’ll be trying some of these with my kids. Fingers crossed that they’re a hit!

Signs of Life New TestamentSigns of Life New TestamentSigns of Life New Testament by David Jeremiah by David Jeremiah

Liked this except for some text issues – bad color choices make some parts of it almost impossible to read, at least in the copy I have. Boo.

Encounters with JesusEncounters with Jesus: Unexpected Answers to Life’s Biggest QuestionsEncounters with Jesus: Unexpected Answers to Life's Biggest Questions by Timothy Keller by Timothy Keller

Liked it but didn’t LOVE it like I expect to do with all Keller books. My expectations might be a tad bit high for him though.

WorshipWorship: The Ultimate PriorityWorship: The Ultimate Priority by John MacArthur by John MacArthur

The most in-depth look at worship I’ve ever read, and I found it fascinating. Not a quick read, but one that required focus and attention. Highly recommended.

DIY CookbookThe America’s Test Kitchen DIY CookbookThe America's Test Kitchen DIY Cookbook

It’s fine, but there weren’t as many things I was tempted to try in this one. I’m sure a homemade version would be tastier, but right now with three young children? It’s not happening. Priorities push my time elsewhere. Someday though, I think it’d be fun to try making my own ketchup, hot sauce, candied ginger, pickles, cheese, and more. The only thing in the book I’m currently making on my own? Granola.

Slow Cooker RevolutionSlow Cooker Revolution Volume 2Slow Cooker Revolution Volume 2: The Easy-Prep Edition by America's Test Kitchen by America’s Test Kitchen

Not sure if it was me or the book, but I wasn’t inspired to try many of these – a first for an ATK book (excluding the one above, which was a very different sort of book). Maybe I’ve just looked at too many slow cooker books, and feel like I already have recipes for most of the types of meals I’m likely to make?

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: I received a copy of Tasting the Seasons from the author for review, but was not required to post a positive review (all opinions are my own!) This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Quick Lit – Recent Christian Reads

The Message of the New TestamentThe Message of the New Testament: Promises KeptThe Message of the New Testament: Promises Kept by Mark Dever | Recent Christian reads reviewed by @SheilaRCraig by Mark Dever

Didn’t like this one quite as much as the companion book on the Old Testament, but that may just be because of my comparative unfamiliarity with some of the Old Testament books, which made me absolutely LOVE that one. This one is still a fantastic look at each book in the New Testament, in addition to one overview of the entire New Testament. Definitely recommended.

Prayer the Great AdventurePrayer, the Great AdventurePrayer, the Great Adventure by David Jeremiah by David Jeremiah

Enjoyed the structure to this one, as the second and third sections of the book focus on prayer lessons gleaned from Matthew 6 and John 17. Matthew 6 as an organizational framework for a book on prayer is familiar to me, but John 17 isn’t one I’ve seen before, and I really appreciated it.

The Heart of the BibleThe Heart of the Bible: Explore the Power of Key Bible PassagesThe Heart of the Bible: Explore the Power of Key Bible Passages by John MacArthur by John MacArthur

A great collection of verses, arranged thematically, with commentary by MacArthur following each verse. It would work well as a yearly devotional, as there are 52 verses featured.

30 Days to Understanding the Christian Life30 Days to Understanding the Christian Life in 15 Minutes a Day!30 Days to Understanding the Christian Life in 15 Minutes a Day!: Expanded Edition by Max Anders by Max Anders

A bit uneven, but still worth reading, especially as some of the sections were very good. Overall I preferred his book 30 Days to Understanding the Bible30 Days to Understanding the Bible by Max Anders, but either could make a good group study.

AngelsAngels: Who They Are and How They Help–What the Bible RevealsAngels: Who They Are and How They Help--What the Bible Reveals by David Jeremiah by David Jeremiah

An informative look at what the Bible says about angels, vs. what we are exposed to through popular culture, folklore, and other stories. I appreciated the section about what angels do, and why it matters.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

If We Could Have Coffee

If We Could Have CoffeeIf We Could Have Coffee … 30 Days of Heart-to-Heart EncouragementIf We Could Have Coffee... (Ebook Shorts): 30 Days of Heart-to-Heart Encouragement by Holley Gerth by Holley Gerth

I’m kind of the wrong person to review devotionals – so much of the time they just seem too insubstantial to me. I want a lot more depth than they generally provide.

That’s really my only complaint with this ebook. The daily entries are all written to be encouraging and comforting, but they’re not my style or what I look for in a devotional.

I do think they’d be great if you’re looking for something with a very warm and supportive feel, and are in a season of life where anything too demanding is not going to work well (perhaps I should have saved this book for immediately post-partum!)

Not really recommended – it reads like it should have been a free ebook for signing up for a newsletter or something similar. However, it is only $1.99 for a Kindle download, so if you’re looking for encouragement in bite-sized pieces, it might be a good fit.

Publisher’s Description:
How are you today, friend? I wish I could ask you that question face-to-face. I’d listen long and hard to your answer. And there are some things I’d want to share with you too. So until we get to have that conversation, I’m sending these words in my place.

Because if we could have coffee, I’d tell you that . . .

. . . you’re loved
. . . you don’t have to try so hard
. . . you’re not alone
. . . you’re part of a plan
. . . your God won’t ever give up on you
. . . and so much more

So think of these words as little love notes for your life. Love notes that started in the heart of God and just happen to be delivered by me to you.

This ebook full of encouraging notes from bestselling author Holley Gerth is the perfect companion to Holley’s book “You’re Going to Be Okay.”

Book Details

Title: If We Could Have Coffee… : 30 Days of Heart-to-Heart EncouragementIf We Could Have Coffee... (Ebook Shorts): 30 Days of Heart-to-Heart Encouragement by Holley Gerth
Author: Holley Gerth
Category: Nonfiction / Devotional
My Rating: 3 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Lit! A Christian Guide to Reading Books

LitLit!: A Christian Guide to Reading BooksLit!: A Christian Guide to Reading Books by Tony Reinke by Tony Reinke

Some mixed feelings towards this one – I loved the idea of this book, and several of my friends have highly recommended it. That may have set me up so that I was expecting it to be amazing, and instead it was a solid book that I’m glad I read, but not one that I want to completely rave over.

What did I love?

That he addresses fiction reading for a Christian. I’ve gotten some comments in the past (not on the blog; I mean in person) about why am I reading fiction when obviously I should only be reading nonfiction. Maybe only Christian titles, but some history or biography books are probably ok if I have to branch out.

Yeah, I don’t agree with that idea at all, so beyond having lots of opportunity to think “exactly!,” the section didn’t have a lot of new info or ideas for me. However, as he discussed this issue, he gave lots of “why” behind it so if it’s an issue for you, you may appreciate his perspective.

The backstory with the title. Lit, as short for Literature of course, but Lit also as a reminder that Christians are lit by the gospel. I love it when titles can have alternate meanings.

His list of types of books to avoid. I agreed with all of his ideas here, and thought it was a great way to frame it.

What did I not love?

The introduction presents the book as a book for “non-readers.” That didn’t exactly inspire me to think it was a book for me. There was a part that seemed a bit condescending, as the author proclaims himself a prolific reader, and talks down to his non-reading readers. That tone didn’t carry through the rest of the book, and was a bit at odds with the vast majority of the text, so I’m glad it didn’t prevent me from continuing to read it.

His emphasis on marginalia. I’m a library user – most of my books come from there, so the entire chapter felt fairly useless. Plus, I’m often biased against marginalia, after reading too many books where people have added their own notes or comments that are just ridiculous, or end up covering the actual text. Also, highlighting an entire page isn’t that helpful, so please stop it.

His dislike of electronic books (which is likely related to his love of marginalia). I love print books, and I love electronic books. I think they both have their place, but he comes close to elevating print too much over electronic. I know on the Kindle (and I’m about 99% sure on the Nook) it’s really easy to add notes, and they can be whatever length you want.

How obvious a lot of it was for me. The second half of the book dealt with reading tips, and I was hoping to find some new ideas. Instead I found myself thinking “yup, I do that. And that. And that. I wrote a post on that, and that. That too.” Admittedly, it’s something I’ve thought a lot about though, so for most people this is probably more useful.

The writing style wasn’t that compelling, and I never felt any sort of “gotta read just one more chapter” motivation to keep reading.

Don’t get me wrong – I liked the book well enough. I just expected to *love* it, and I didn’t. It was worth reading, and motivated me to continue thinking about the priorities I have with the books I pick. In large part, I think my biggest issue is simply that I wasn’t the right audience for the book. I’m a voracious reader, and I don’t need to be convinced of the benefits of reading, or of reading books other than the Bible or theology books. So much of it seemed obvious to me, but I can see the benefits of the book for others. [Read more…]

Twitterature: Recent Christian Reads (June 2014)

Understanding the 66 Books of the BibleUnderstanding the 66 Books of the Bible by David Jeremiah
Liked this one quite a bit – it included a brief overview of the books, as well as a key thought, scripture, prayer, and action. Super brief, but it worked well at what it was – a cursory sketch of each book.

Insight's Archaeology Handbook
Insight’s Archaeology HandbookInsight's Archaeology Handbook by Insight for Living
By “handbook” this one means “overview” as well – this is not an in-depth look at things by any means. It focuses on 10 key archaeological findings, and how they connect to the Bible. I enjoyed it, and it was just the amount of depth I wanted right now.

Praying God's Word for Your HusbandPraying God’s Word for Your HusbandPraying God's Word for Your Husband by Kathi Lipp by Kathi Lipp
Liked the structure for this – she’s pulled together scriptures relating to specific topics, so you can pray for your husband directly from the Bible. Topics include things like his relationships (with God and others), safety, work, etc.

Strange GodsStrange GodsStrange Gods: Unmasking the Idols in Everyday Life by Elizabeth Scalia by Elizabeth Scalia
I think it’s easy to believe that we don’t have idols any more (at least not the same way they did back in Old Testament times), but Scalia explains how easy it is to have modern idols: idols of self, of plans, of technology, of sex. Everything in our lives has the potential to become an idol. Some of the specifics she details I skimmed as they seemed to relate more for Catholics, but even as a Protestant I found most of the book eye-opening and worth reading.

Stop Dating the ChurchStop Dating the Church!: Fall in Love with the Family of GodStop Dating the Church!: Fall in Love with the Family of God by Joshua Harris by Joshua Harris
Perfectly timed read as far as our church search goes – it was more motivation to find one and get settled into it, truly making it our home. (Link goes to the revised version, which has a new title.)

recent reads, twitterature-style

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

On the Road to Joyful Motherhood

On the Road to Joyful MotherhoodOn the Road to Joyful Motherhood by Jessica Fisher

A heads-up if this book sounds appealing: it’s currently being offered for $5 through the end of May, and then the price will go up. If you’re interested in it, grab it at the introductory price while you can!

I know, I was just recommending another book by Fisher yesterday, and I’m back today with this one. I don’t want to hold off on writing about it though, because of the special pricing that only lasts through the end of the month.

Devotionals are often hit-or-miss for me. There are seasons in my life where I love love love them – finding their bite-sized content a perfect fit for my time, energy, and brain power. Other times they can seem simplistic and trite, and I long for a bit more depth in what I’m reading.

This book manages to fit perfectly with my current mood and reading desires, and also manages to include enough information to avoid feeling shallow, while still being easy to read in a short session. The daily format includes several pages per entry, rather than the one paragraph I’ve seen in other books, and that length allows her to delve more deeply into the topic.

The writing style is very approachable so it never feels overwhelming, and is still something that would work in even the busiest of seasons. Reflection questions are provided after each topic, and lots of thoughtful ideas about how to apply the concepts discussed.

There may be a bit of an identity crisis with the book: the title doesn’t claim it’s a devotional (although it’s how I thought of it), instead billing itself as 31 “meditations.” This may be because not every topic includes a scripture that ties into it, although many (most?) of them do. The description does say it’s a devotional though, so consider this a heads-up if you want lots of spiritual content in every entry of your devotionals: this doesn’t always deliver that. Instead, it provides encouragement as you make the most of your days as a mom.

The book is definitely focused on moms, so I wouldn’t recommend it if you’re not a parent. If you are though, this was a very encouraging and motivating book. It reminded me a bit of Loving the Little Years, and as much as I adored that book that’s definitely a compliment.

I really enjoyed it, and got a lot out of it, and would recommend it.

Publisher’s Description:
Years ago Jessica Fisher determined that she wanted to enjoy this life as much as possible, even if it was hard. She’d look at snapshots of her children and remember that day or week or season and realize she’d been far too crabby in that moment to fully appreciate the gifts God had given her, her children at the top of the list.

On the Road to Joyful Motherhood, is a 31-day devotional to redirect our hearts, minds, and hands to this glorious calling of motherhood.

Each reading is accompanied by Scripture to meditate on as well as journaling questions to help moms and other caregivers work through hard issues to make their lives more enjoyable and the attitudes more positive.

Book Details

Title: On the Road to Joyful Motherhood: 31 Meditations to Help You Enjoy the Ride
Author: Jessica Fisher
Category: Nonfiction
My Rating: 4 Stars

I received a copy of the book for review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Twitterature May 2014

Twitterature

Holey, Wholly, HolyHoley, Wholly, Holy: A Lenten Journey of RefinementHoley, Wholly, Holy: A Lenten Journey of Refinement by Kris Camealy by Kris Camealy

Very reflective book that could work any time of year, not just during Lent.

The Enneagram Made EasyThe Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the 9 Types of PeopleThe Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the 9 Types of People by Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele by Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele

Loved this easy-to-understand look at the Enneagram. And now I know I’m a 5.

My Name's Not SusieMy Name’s Not Susie: A Life Transformed by LiteracyMy Name's Not Susie: A Life Transformed by Literacy by Sharon Jean Hamilton by Sharon Jean Hamilton

Hard to read at times, as she had a difficult upbringing. I enjoyed the memoir aspects more than the literacy narrative.

Best 100 Juices for KidsBest 100 Juices for Kids: Totally Yummy, Awesomely Healthy, & Naturally Sweetened Homemade Alternatives to Soda Pop, Sports Drinks, and Expensive Bottled JuicesBest 100 Juices for Kids: Totally Yummy, Awesomely Healthy, & Naturally Sweetened Homemade Alternatives to Soda Pop, Sports Drinks, and Expensive Bottled Juices by Jessica Fisher by Jessica Fisher

We’ve tried a couple of the smoothie recipes already, and one was a big hit (the other I should have modified a bit more to our tastes). Am sorely tempted to buy a juicer so I can try some of the juice mixtures as well.

What Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and MarriageWhat Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and Marriage: Lessons for People from Animals and Their TrainersWhat Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and Marriage: Lessons for People from Animals and Their Trainers by Amy Sutherland by Amy Sutherland

Short and readable and very enjoyable look at applying some animal training methods to human relationships.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

31 Days of Great Nonfiction: Bittersweet

BittersweetBittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard WayBittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way by Shauna Niequist by Shauna Niequist

While reading Bittersweet I was torn between racing through the pages, as it was just so good, and trying to force myself to slow down and savor it.

There are some sections where it was all I could do to not highlight ever paragraph. The chapter on what we ate and why it matters read like a summary of her next book Bread & Wine, and it was fun seeing the seeds for the future book in this one. The chapter on the importance of friendship and prioritizing spending time with good friends was especially fantastic, and it seemed so appropriate that I read it while on a retreat with my book club friends!

I’m categorizing it as a memoir, because it is, sort of – the chapters are short vignettes telling pieces of her story, using her stories to illustrate the concept. It’s so hard to categorize it though, because it’s a book about growth, and parenting, and writing, and identity, and faith, and change, and grace, and really, just go read this book.

A warning though: if you can make it through the entire book without at least tearing up, you’re stronger than I am. The chapters “What Might Have Been” and “Crying in the Bathroom” both had me sobbing. You will probably want to keep that possibility in mind as you decide when and where to read this one.

Publisher’s Description:
In her follow-up book to Cold Tangerines: Celebrating the Extraordinary Nature of Everyday LifeCold Tangerines: Celebrating the Extraordinary Nature of Everyday Life by Shauna Niequist, author Shauna Niequist shifts her gaze to the challenges and blessings of change in Bittersweet. Drawing from her own experiences in a recent season of pain and chaos, she explores the bits of wisdom and growth we earn the hard way, through change, loss, and transition, and offers her own reflections on what brought her hope along the way.

31 Days of Great NonfictionIf you’ve read my blog any length of time, you’ve likely heard me gush over Niequist’s newest book, Bread & Wine. If you’ve missed it so far, please go and read it. It’s very like BittersweetBittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way by Shauna Niequist, with the reflective essays, but the food connections are stronger, and the included recipes (at least the ones I’ve tried) are fabulous. I haven’t read her first book Cold TangerinesCold Tangerines: Celebrating the Extraordinary Nature of Everyday Life by Shauna Niequist, mostly because I’m trying to hold off so I don’t read all three of her books in one year and then have to impatiently wait for something else from her.

To see all the books featured in 31 Days of Great Nonfiction, go to the series page.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!