New on Your Stack (volume 29)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


Cover for Deadly SanctuaryI am so excited for Annette (AKBookworm) because she’s going to be reading Cinder for the first time! Such a great book, and a great series. I hope she loves it.

Annette also highlighted Deadly Sanctuary, which intrigues me thanks to the Arizona setting.


Cover of A Fool & His MonetJill (Days at Home) let me know that A Fool & His Monet is currently free for Kindle, so I figured it was worth a try. I like the main character being an FBI special agent focused on art crimes. It may be a little too suspense/romance focused for me to love, but I’ll try it. Someday.


Cover of Fire and FantasyArwen (The Tech Chef) added a slew of fantasy novels in August, and despite knowing nothing about any of the authors, I’m so tempted by the Fire and Fantasy collection simply because it’s only $.99 and includes 20 books. That’s a whole lot of reading material for a dollar.


Cover of Beneath a Scarlet SkyStacie (Sincerely Stacie) added so many great books to her reading stack in August. Fortunately for the sake of my TBR stack, I’ve already read many of them! Reading People, Option B, For the Love, Gulp, Grunt, and How to Manage Your Home without Losing Your Mind. All of them range from “worth reading” to “read this as soon as possible” in my recommended reading scale. 🙂

I am interested in the novel Beneath a Scarlet Sky, by Mark Sullivan. It sounds like an amazing premise, and to hear that it’s based on a true story? Astonishing.

What’s embarrassing to report is that when I went to Amazon to find out the details of Beneath a Scarlet Sky, it tells me that I already own the item, and have since April. So much for me keeping track of new books.


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10+ Books Perfect to Read in Autumn

10 Books Perfect to Read in Autumn / 10 Books Perfect to Read in the FallSummer Books seem to get all the attention, but autumn is the perfect time to dive into some wonderful reads. Whether you’re in the mood for longer, more thought-provoking books, coming-of-age stories with the growing-up nostalgia brought on by back-to-school season, novels with a strong sense of place, or works that requiring more focus than beach-reading allows.

Here are 10 books that are perfect to read in autumn, plus extra options for those who are already well-read in fall literature.

Cover of A Tree Grows in BrooklynA Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Why so perfect for fall? The emphasis on education makes this feel especially appropriate to read during back-to-school season.

This turn of the century coming-of-age story is an American classic for good reason. The beautifully crafted tale pulls you into Francie’s story and has you rooting for her as she grows up in challenging circumstances. There is an undercurrent of hope that buoys everything.

Already read it? Try A Distant Prospect or Emily of New Moon for other thoughtful coming-of-age novels.


Cover of Still LifeStill Life by Louise Penny

Why so perfect for fall? Penny is amazing at developing the setting for the novels through wonderful details of location, food, and weather.

The Chief Inspector Gamache series mostly takes place in a rural village south of Montreal, and the setting is key in most of the books in the series. This is the first book in a lengthy series that continues to improve, and the backstory behind the characters is a reason to savor every book.

Already read it? Try Bruno, Chief of Police or Death of a Red Heroine for other mystery series with a strong sense of place.


Cover of Wolf HallWolf Hall by Hilary Mantel

Why so perfect for fall? It’s a big reading commitment, that needs focused time to appreciate the depth offered by the novel.

This Booker Prize-winning historical fiction brings Thomas Cromwell to life. It’s an utterly fascinating account with an unusual writing style. Stay with it long enough to adjust, as your efforts will be richly rewarded.

Already read it? Try Kristin Lavransdattar or 11/22/63 for other historical sagas.


Cover of RebeccaRebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Why so perfect for fall? It’s an ideal choice when you’re looking for something to read while curled up under a blanket, sipping a hot drink.

From the famous opening line to the dramatic conclusion, Rebecca is also perfect for a discussion title, if you’re looking for one for your book club to read this fall. The atmospheric novel is a modern classic, blending Gothic romance and mystery.

Already read it?Try My Cousin Rachel or Dragonwyck for additional novels with a Gothic feel and slight romance storyline.


Cover of Harry PotterHarry Potter by J. K. Rowling

Why so perfect for fall? Because every book begins as Harry heads off to school in September, looking forward to the fresh start a new school year provides. No, back-to-school novels don’t have to take place at a boarding school, but it never hurts when they do. Add in the magical element for extra fun.

Already read it? Try The Magicians or Charmed Life for other stories about magical education.


Cover of Anne of Green GablesAnne of Green Gables by Lucy Maude Montgomery

Why so perfect for fall? Because it includes the famous line “I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.” And because autumn at Green Gables sounds gorgeous – the birch trees have turned golden, the maple branches give Anne a thrill, and the wild cherry trees lining the road are lovely shades. Fall foliage never sounded so beautiful as Montgomery describes it.

Already read it? Try The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate or Cartwheeling in Thunderstorms for more heart-warming reads about precocious young girls.


Cover of Crossing to SafetyCrossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner

Why so perfect for fall? The academic setting, the quiet feel of it all, and the stunning writing which is simply ideal for savoring. Stegner excels at weaving a gentle narrative following friends over the course of their lives, bringing the reader into their story. Any description of it fails to do it justice.

Already read it? Try Jayber Crow or Hannah Coulter for other quiet stories with a literary feel.


Cover of And Then There Were NoneAnd Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

Why so perfect for fall? One of her most famous mysteries, the eerie setting, and countdown of survivors makes for a satisfying mystery with a slightly Halloween-inspired feel. Add in the narrative following the children’s verse, and the disappearing soldiers mimicking the fallen guests and there is a decided sense of menace to the text.

Already read it? Try The Turn of the Screw or We Have Always Lived in the Castle for other classic novels that tilt towards the creepy side.


Cover of Team of RivalsTeam of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Why so perfect for fall? It’s a hefty reading investment, one where you need plenty of time to appreciate Goodwin’s clever structuring of her award-winning work.

Already read it? Try Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War or A World Undone: The Story of the Great War, 1914 to 1918 for additional history books, both appropriate to read this time of year.


Cover of Northanger AbbeyNorthanger Abbey by Jane Austen

Why so perfect for fall? It’s a terrific read around Halloween if you’re not quite brave enough for a true horror book.

Slightly eerie, Austen’s Gothic-inspired novel gives nods to what was then the supremely popular The Mysteries of Udolpho.

Already read it? Try Wuthering Heights or Mistress of Mellyn for additional novels with a Gothic feel.


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Cover Love: Plainsong

Book covers fascinate me. Why are some covers kept for various editions and languages? Why are some changed for seemingly every publication variation? I don’t know, but it makes for very interesting viewing.

Kent Haruf’s Plainsong had more cover versions than I was expecting.

The book I read had this cover: big Western sky, lots of clouds, and what look like foothills.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

The large print version takes a very similar approach, but it has more light shining through the clouds. This is my favorite cover.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

And so does the audio edition.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

There are at least four Picador versions. The Picador Pan MacMillan paperback features a girl with her hair blowing in the wind, with two men on horseback in the background. Appropriate enough, although I thought Victoria was described as having dark hair. Perhaps I imagined that.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

A Picador Pan Macmillan paperback from 2013 shows the back of a woman with her hair blowing in the breeze, and she seems to be in a field of flowers. This is one of my favorite covers.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Another Picador paperback version, this one from 2001.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

One more Picador edition, although I’m not sure of the date.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Foreign language editions are always especially interesting. The Dutch version features horses fighting. I don’t remember that in the book at all – did I miss it?

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

The Finnish edition shows a girl looking pensively out into the distance. It seems fitting for the book, so no complaints from me.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Four French editions, one with a bridle, one with two men on horseback, and two with a windmill (but not the same windmill).

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Then there’s the German edition, with the isolated farmhouse.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

The Italian edition looks like it’s for a book set during a drought.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

The Persian edition also features a girl, looking out alone, but this girl is in the middle of a crop of some kind. Wasn’t she staying with ranchers, not farmers?

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Finally, the Polish edition shows an old suitcase.

Cover image for Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Which cover(s) are your favorites?

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

The “Cover Love” series is inspired by the “Judging Books by Their Covers” series previously featured at Quirky Bookworm.

New on the Stack in August 2017

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

I know, lots and lots and lots of new books. I love options. 🙂

Nonfiction

Come and Eat coverCome and Eat: A Celebration of Love and Grace Around the Everyday Table by Bri McKoy

How did I get it: Received an electronic review copy for review.
Why did I get it: It sounded appealing.

Reading People coverReading People: How Seeing the World through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything by Anne Bogel

How did I get it: Book blogging perks.
Why did I get it: Because it sounds AWESOME.

BE Series Bundle coversBE Series Bundle: The Gospels by Warren Wiersbe

How did I get it: Bought the Kindle version
Why did I get it: It was only $1.99 for all 6 books in the bundle. I couldn’t resist the deal.

The Card Catalog coverThe Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures by Library of Congress

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I love the card catalog, and liked the nostalgia of learning some of the history behind it at the Library of Congress.

The Brontë Sisters coverThe Brontë Sisters: The Brief Lives of Charlotte, Emily, and Anne by Catherine Reef

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Debating if it’s a good alternative to recommend to the other Brontë biography that’s one of the selections for my in-person book club’s upcoming book flight.

One-Pan Wonders coverOne-Pan Wonders: Fuss-Free Meals for Your Sheet Pan, Dutch Oven, Skillet, Roasting Pan, Casserole, and Slow Cooker by Cook’s Country

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Love the idea of these recipes.

Essentialism coverEssentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s been lingering on my list since Catherine first wrote about it, and then she wrote about it again recently, and it’s motivating me to finally read the book.

Food52 A New Way to Dinner coverFood52 A New Way to Dinner: A Playbook of Recipes and Strategies for the Week Ahead by Amanda Hesser & Merrill Stubbs

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: My library highlighted it as a featured title, and I fell for the promotion.

The Lost City of Z coverThe Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s been lingering on my TBR list, and with the upcoming movie I’m trying to get it read sooner rather than later.

Chasing Slow coverChasing Slow: Courage to Journey Off the Beaten Path by Erin Loechner

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: My friend Sarah recommended it.

Balanced and Barefoot coverBalanced and Barefoot: How Unrestricted Outdoor Play Makes for Strong, Confident, and Capable Children by Angela J. Hanscom

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how I heard about it, but I liked the premise and wanted to read more.

Fiction

A Conspiracy of Kings coverA Conspiracy of Kings by Megan Whalen Turner

How did I get it: Bought the Audible version.
Why did I get it: Love this series.

This Side of Murder coverThis Side of Murder by Anna Lee Huber

How did I get it: Received a review copy from NetGalley.
Why did I get it: I’ve enjoyed Huber’s other series, so wanted to try this one.

Plainsong coverPlainsong by Kent Haruf

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Bookclub selection for September.

Garden Spells coverGarden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Bookclub selection for September.

Glass Houses coverGlass Houses by Louise Penny

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Inspector Gamache series!

Six of Crows coverSix of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how it ended up on my TBR.

His Majesty's Dragon coverHis Majesty’s Dragon by Naomi Novik

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Dragons and the Napoleonic wars = must try.

A Pale Horse coverA Pale Horse by Charles Todd

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Ian Rutledge series.

A Pattern of Lies coverA Pattern of Lies by Charles Todd

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Bess Crawford series.

Wednesday's Child coverWednesday’s Child by Peter Robinson

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Peter Robinson series.

Final Account coverFinal Account by Peter Robinson (also published as Dry Bones that Dream)

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Peter Robinson series.

Queen of the Tearling coverQueen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how or why it was on my TBR list.

Just Killing Time coverJust Killing Time by Julianne Holmes
How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I fell for the cover of a later one in the series, so wanted to try the first one first.

Peril at End House coverPeril at End House by Agatha Christie

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it:

Gone-Away Lake coverGone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Tara in my Facebook book group raved over it.

Return to Gone-Away coverReturn to Gone-Away by Elizabeth Enright

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Sequel to Gone-Away Lake.

Nim's Island coverNim’s Island by Wendy Orr

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m considering passing it along to my son to read, and wanted to pre-read it.

Baby coverBaby by Patricia MacLachlan

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Considering it as a future read-aloud with the kids (or some of the kids), or even as a book for one or more of them to read themselves. Pre-reading it to get an idea if it’ll be a good choice.

P.S. From Paris coverP.S. From Paris by Marc Levy

How did I get it: Kindle First title for the month
Why did I get it: It was the most appealing of the available options.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or Instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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The Best Book Club Item EVER

No exaggeration, I have been wanting this item for FIVE YEARS, ever since seeing a friend with it at book club. But sadly for all book fans, it was no longer manufactured.

TableTopics Book Club edition

So I was THRILLED to discover that it is now back. And after pausing for all of 30 seconds, I ordered my own set, then wrote this post. In that order, because I wasn’t taking any chances that it would go out of stock.

What is this magical item? Why did I immediately hit the “buy now” button on Amazon?

TableTopics Book Club Edition

TableTopics Book Club editionIt’s only the best set of questions for book discussion ever. One nice box (so the cards inside don’t get bent or scuffed), stuffed full with questions.

Run out of time to track down book-specific questions before your meeting? No worries – you’ll find some applicable questions in here.

I know, I’m gushing, but I am seriously that excited to find that this is being made again, and I have my own copy now, and I can recommend it to all book club fans.

Sure, they have lots of other versions. I’m even thinking about getting the family version. But it’s the book club one that I adore and now I have one of my very own. It’s the best.

TableTopics Book Club questions


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New on Your Stack (Volume 28)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


What She Ate coverStacie (Sincerly Stacie) is killing my TBR stack this month – SO MANY BOOKS that I want to add to my list. Two were already there: Reading People (which I’ve already pre-ordered), and What She Ate, (which I’d recently put on my library wishlist, a kind of a holding spot for books I may borrow soon). Then there was The Silent Sister, which sounds great, and Where the Light Falls – I do love historical fiction in unfamiliar time periods. Plus her kids’ books – especially Our Story Begins and that Weird but True Daily Planner looks so much fun. And my kids don’t even need it!


Reading People CoverSpeaking of adding to my TBR, Kate (Opinionated Book Lover), isn’t far behind Stacie. Kate is also on the book launch team for Reading People, and I’m trying to convince myself that I am not jealous of that. That I have my own copy of the book arriving soon as I’ve preordered it. It’s only somewhat working.

Then there’s Something Like Happy, which I’m eyeing as a possible light-yet-discussable book club option. And of course, I’m curious about The Book of Air, considering my obsession this summer with reading all things connected with Jane Eyre. Finally, Seven Stones sounds like a book I would love – Scotland, magic, historical fiction. It’s not available at my library, so I’m not sure I’ll get to it, but it’s tempting.


Talon coverAnnette (AKBookworm) is new to the linkup, and she has some great new books on her stack for July – like Quiet and Wired for Story. She also introduced me to Talon, the first book in a series about dragons. I love the dragon idea, but I’m not certain if I like the teenage-romance angle it possibly appears to take. I’ll have to dig into the reviews, before I fall for the premise and great covers.


The Bones Will Speak coverAs always, Jill (Days at Home) has some of the prettiest book covers featured. What catches my eye the most though is The Bones Will Speak. I’m intrigued by the forensic artist perspective, so I’m considering picking up the first in the series, A Cry from the Dust.


Arwen (The Tech Chef) has a *very* intriguing food book on her list: The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. I like my vegetarian meals at times, but I’ve never wanted to go 100% vegetarian or vegan. I’m curious what this has to say.


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10 Nonfiction Books I Can’t Stop Recommending

10 Nonfiction Books I Can't Stop Recommending

  1. The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

    It works for so many reading situations and interests. Enjoy reading about history? Interested in sports history? Narrative nonfiction? Nonfiction that reads like fiction? Just looking for a great book? Boys in the Boat!

  2. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

    At the slightest opportunity to promote this look at Introverts, I take it. Introverts needing to understand themselves, extroverts needing to understand the “other side” – it works for all. I’m eager to read Quiet Power, her version for children, as well.

  3. The Road from Coorain by Jill Ker Conway

    A thought-provoking memoir, which touches on so many topics. It’s marvelous for book clubs, and it’s not nearly as well-known as it should be. Anyone looking to expand their usual reading choices should take a close look at this as a possibility.

  4. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

    Recommended when someone isn’t afraid of a book with some heft. It may be over 800 pages, but it’s a marvelous account of Lincoln’s presidency. She has a gift for bringing the past to life and making me care about things I never expected to (like Lincoln’s cabinet).

  5. 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
    It’s an easy introduction to the epistolary style and is a great follow-up read to so many books (but especially The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society). It’s also short enough that it works well as a recommendation for anyone looking for a quick read.
  6. Garlic and Sapphires by Ruth Reichl
    Yes, it’s the third of her memoirs, so you should probably read the other ones first, but this one was the most interesting, as it looks at her life as restaurant critic for The New York Times. I’ve never wanted to be a restaurant critic, but this book made me wish I was friends with one and could go out to eat with them occasionally.
  7. In a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson
    It’s actually a toss-up between this and another Bryson title, A Walk in the Woods. Both combine memoir with history and geography in a humorous travelogue that always makes me feel like I’m traveling with him. In addition, these are both excellent as audio books.
  8. As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes
    Speaking of audio books, at the slightest query for a great audio book I mention Elwes’ memoir. I don’t even like celebrity memoirs, but this isn’t so much an account of Elwes’ life, as it is a look back at the making of the movie The Princess Bride. And as much as I enjoyed reading it, listening to it is even better. The familiar voice of Wesley, along with brief appearances by Billy Crystal, Robin Wright, Wallace Shawn, Mandy Patinkin, Rob Reiner, and more. Spectacular!
  9. Give Your Child The World: Raising Globally Minded Kids One Book at a Time by Jamie C. Martin
    Not only for homeschoolers, although I do bring it up regularly in that context. For anyone wanting to introduce children to the world, it’s an amazing annotated listing of books by geographic region, organized by age range (4-6, 6-8, 8-10, 10-12). There’s also a helpful index by time period in the back.
  10. 102 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum by Cathy Duffy
    I suggest this title ALL THE TIME for anyone thinking of homeschooling, wondering where to start if they want to homeschool, and of course for those looking to consider particular curriculum options. What isn’t so obvious from the title is that the book includes a fabulous introductory section, describing types of homeschoolers, and helping parents figure out their child(ren)’s learning style(s). If you are homeschooling or thinking of homeschooling, you should read this book.

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Books I Read in July 2017

What a great reading month! I did a lot of listening to audio books, which is why my reading total is so high – 11 of the books I finished were audio titles!

Books Read in July 2017

    Mysteries

  1. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

    So. Good. It’s a story-within-a-story, and the framework is really well done and made for such a fun book. I listened to it, and the narrators did an excellent job. Plus I didn’t figure out either solution (although I had a suspicion about one of them, I couldn’t get the why behind it.)

  2. The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

    An enjoyable follow-up to both Jane Eyre and the biography on Charlotte Brontë I’d recently read. I think it’d have been even better if I’d ever read Wuthering Heights and/or Agnes Grey!

  3. A False Mirror by Charles Todd

    The premise behind this one was absurd, but I do like Inspector Rutledge, so I just kind of nodded and went with the ridiculousness of the setup.

  4. An Unwilling Accomplice by Charles Todd

    Another favorite mystery series because of my affection for the main characters, not because of any individual title. It’s worth starting at the beginning of the series, although it’s not as essential as it would be with other series.

  5. Other Fiction

  6. Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal

    Lots of potential in this one, and it was a really good book, but missed out on being really great. The narrators are excellent, so as long as you don’t mind lots of profanity (in one section at least), it’s a good one to listen to on audio.

  7. Among Others by Jo Walton

    I’m not even sure what to say about this one exactly – I loved it, and read it in under 24 hours. I liked the idea behind it, the setting, the bookworm main character. And yet, looking at it objectively, it’s not one I can recommend to anyone and everyone. It doesn’t really have all that much action – there’s lots of day-to-day recounting of boarding school events, and tons of science fiction books and authors mentioned. I think it’s a book that’s either going to fit the reader so well that they love it, or leave a reader cold, wondering why on earth there isn’t anything happening.

  8. Road to Paradise by Karen Barnett

    Sweet story, but not my type of book overall. I thought it was going to be a historical mystery and it’s a historical Christian romance. I did like the setting!

  9. Nonfiction

  10. On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety by Andrea Petersen

    Really interesting, and well-written. Petersen takes her own story and expands it to give a look at anxiety in general, and various treatments for it. It was a fascinating account.

  11. My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues by Pamela Paul

    I’d expected to love this one, and certainly to find it more interesting than On Edge. Instead, I found it veering towards boring at times, and unsuccessful at making her story more interesting to a wider audience.

  12. Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Heart by Claire Harman

    Excellent for learning details about Charlotte Brontë’s life (I had no idea she ever married!), although the writing style was dry and at times it was a bit tedious. Read it if you want to know more about Charlotte or her sisters, but it’s not a must-read as a generally-interesting biography.

  13. Kid Lit

  14. Winterbound by Margery Williams Bianco

    Enjoyable, old-fashioned story. I’m keeping an eye out for a copy to add to our library, because it’d be a good one to have on hand for the kids to read in the future.

  15. The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

    I would have loved this one as a kid. As an adult, I enjoyed it well enough, and I’ll read it to my kids soon(ish).

  16. The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill

    Has gotten tons of praise since publication, including winning the 2017 Newbery Medal. And I liked it, but I didn’t LOVE LOVE LOVE it like I somewhat expected to with the press it’s gotten.

  17. Savvy by Ingrid Law

    Fun, with an unusual take on magical powers. It’s the first in a trilogy, and eventually I’ll look for the others, although it’s not a immediate priority. I’ll keep this in mind for my kids to read when they get into middle-grade books.

  18. Cookbooks

  19. Sheet Pan Suppers: 120 Recipes for Simple, Surprising, Hands-Off Meals Straight from the Oven by Molly Gilbert

    So many tempting ideas in this one, especially a couple of the breakfast ideas as I daydream about our upcoming bookclub retreat!

  20. Nigella Fresh: Delicious Flavors on Your Plate All Year Round by Nigella Lawson

    Nothing jumped out at me that I wanted to try, but I adore Nigella’s voice, and love reading her commentary.

  21. Week in a Day by Rachael Ray

    It’s not what I thought it was going to be, and I still want to look at the cookbook I thought I was getting. For a cookbook where the focus is on prepping for five meals on one day, there was very little direction on the order for the meals to be prepped, or ways to make things easier on the cook. It felt very forced as far as making recipes fit into the supposed premise.

  22. The Farm Chicks in the Kitchen by Serena Thompson and Teri Edwards

    Grabbed on a whim from the library shelf, so the fact that I didn’t really like it all that much isn’t too disappointing. It included appetizers, lunch, desserts … but no dinner ideas! And really, dinner is where I want ideas. 🙂

  23. The Melendy Quartet

  24. The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright
  25. The Four-Story Mistake by Elizabeth Enright
  26. Then There Were Five by Elizabeth Enright
  27. Spiderweb for Two by Elizabeth Enright
  28. General thoughts about the entire series: I LOVED IT. How on earth did I never read these books as a child? I would have adored them, and wished I could be adopted into the family, and have their adventures. Great on audio as well. I can’t wait to read them to my kids, or at least introduce them to them, and then let them read all four themselves.

    Rereads

  29. The Hanging Valley by Peter Robinson

    The geography on this one confused me, and I got a little sidetracked by trying to understand what on earth Robinson was describing. Eventually I gave up and just enjoyed the characters. I’m still not entirely sure what happened at the very end, but it would be a major spoiler to explain so if you’ve read it recently and can discuss, let me know.

  30. Past Reason Hated by Peter Robinson

    So dated as far as social issues go, and the book itself drags quite a bit. Unless you’re obsessive about reading all the books in a series, this one is completely skippable.

  31. Cain His Brother by Anne Perry

    And another book where the middle drags on way too much. This should easily been edited down by at least 100 pages, to make for a more engaging book. The details get really repetitive. The solution to the mystery is also completely unbelievable.

  32. Not For Me

  33. Plague Land by S. D. Sykes

    I need at least one character to care about in a book, and this one didn’t have any. Despite wanting to like the book – I love the medieval time period, and the premise behind the book – a third son is recalled from the monastery he’s been sent to when his father and older brothers both die from the plague – was intriguing. Alas, the book itself was boring and filled with unpleasant characters. The mystery itself was even a let-down and didn’t make up for the disagreeable characters. .

  34. Work Clean: The Life-Changing Power of Mise-En-Place to Organize Your Life, Work and Mind by Dan Charnas

    Almost preachy in tone, and super repetitive. Would have been stronger as a long article or series of blog posts, but as a full-length book it felt padded.

  35. I’d Tell You I Love You But Then I’d Have to Kill You by Ally Carter

    Teetered on the edge between amusingly quirky and entertaining, and ridiculously absurd. Eventually toppled off into the absurd side for me. I think I’m too old and cranky to appreciate it.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on the Stack in July 2017

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

So. Many. New. Books.

That is not an apology or justification, just an acknowledgment that I have an even bigger stack of new titles than usual, and I love it.

Nonfiction

The Guynd coverThe Guynd: A Scottish Journal by Belinda Rathbone

How did I get it: Bought a used copy since my library doesn’t have it.
Why did I get it: Catherine made it sound irresistible.

Happy Pretty Messy coverHappy Pretty Messy by Natalie Wise

How did I get it: Bought a Kindle copy.
Why did I get it: My friend wrote it and it was a great deal.

The Miracle Morning for Writers coverThe Miracle Morning for Writers by Hal Elrod, Steve Scott, and Honoree Corder

How did I get it: Bought a Kindle copy.
Why did I get it: Hard to resist at $1.99

Nigella Fresh coverNigella Fresh: Delicious Flavors on Your Plate All Year Round by Nigella Lawson

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: While I’m not sure that I’ve every made anything of hers, I love reading Nigella’s recipes.

Drop the Ball coverDrop the Ball: Achieving More by Doing Less by Tiffany Dufu

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember where I heard about it, but the concept is appealing.

Sheet Pan Suppers coverSheet Pan Suppers: 120 Recipes for Simple, Surprising, Hands-Off Meals Straight from the Oven by Molly Gilbert

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Love reading cookbooks to get new ideas for dinner.

Salad for Dinner coverSalad for Dinner by Jeanne Kelley

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: I had the chance to go to the library BY MYSELF and I took the opportunity to browse the cookbook shelf.

Week in a Day coverWeek in a Day by Rachael Ray

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Like the concept behind this one.

The Farm Chicks in the Kitchen coverThe Farm Chicks in the Kitchen by Serena Thompson and Teri Edwards

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: It looked pretty.

It's Ok Not to Share coverIt’s OK Not to Share and Other Renegade Rules for Raising Competent and Compassionate Kids by Heather Shumaker

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember who recommended Shumaker’s books.

It's Ok to Go Up the SlideIt’s Ok to Go Up The Slide by Heather Shumaker

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Both of her titles were recommended (in a Facebook group? Some post I’m forgetting?)

Fiction

Bright Island coverBright Island by Mabel Robinson

How did I get it: Bought a used copy.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how I heard about it.

The King of Attolia coverThe King of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner

How did I get it: Bought the Audible version.
Why did I get it: Love this series!

Kristin Lavransdatter coverKristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset

How did I get it: Bought the Audible version.
Why did I get it: It’s been highly recommended, and I couldn’t resist the deal of using only one credit to get that many hours of listening.

The Pilgrim's Progress coverPilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

How did I get it: Bought the Kindle version
Why did I get it: R is doing a Bible study on it, and he wanted a physical copy. I’m reading along with him, as their pace is only one chapter a week.

A Beautiful Poison coverA Beautiful Poison by Lydia Kang

How did I get it: Selected it as my free Kindle First title for July.
Why did I get it: It sounded the most interesting to me out of all the available options.

Counted with the Stars coverCounted with the Stars by Connilyn Cossette

How did I get it: Kindle freebie.
Why did I get it: Interested by the setting.

The Faerie Guardian coverThe Faerie Guardian by Rachel Morgan

How did I get it: Kindle freebie.
Why did I get it: Worth trying.

Daemoniac coverDaemoniac by Kat Ross

How did I get it: Kindle freebie.
Why did I get it: The description sounded like it could be great.

Salted coverSalted by Aaron Galvin

How did I get it: Kindle freebie.
Why did I get it: I’m intrigued by the premise – a mermaid story for boys.

Two Heads Two Spikes coverTwo Heads, Two Spikes by Jason Paul Rice

How did I get it: Freebie for signing up for the author’s newsletter
Why did I get it: He’s a prolific author, so if I like his style I’ll have lots more to read.

Kitchens of the Great Midwest coverKitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: The author was speaking at a nearby library in July, so I wanted to read his book before going to the presentation.

Magpie Murders coverMagpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s gotten a lot of buzz, so I wanted to give it a try.

An Unwilling Accomplice coverAn Unwilling Accomplice by Charles Todd

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Bess Crawford series.

The Hanging Valley coverThe Hanging Valley by Peter Robinson

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Alan Banks series.

Past Reason Hated coverPast Reason Hated by Peter Robinson

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Alan Banks series.

A Study in Charlotte coverA Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Kate made it sound appealing.

The Saturdays coverThe Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: I’ve heard about Enright for ages, but had never read her before. I finally decided to try her when I saw the first was available from my library on audio.

The Four-Story Mistake coverThe Four-Story Mistake by Elizabeth Enright

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Had to get the rest of the series.

Then There Were Five coverThen There Were Five by Elizabeth Enright

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

Spiderweb for Two coverSpiderweb for Two by Elizabeth Enright

How did I get it: Borrowed it on audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

The Madwoman Upstairs coverThe Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: My Jane Eyre-inspired reading focus continues.

The Diamond Age coverThe Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: August’s book club selection.

Among Others coverAmong Others by Jo Walton

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how I first discovered this one, but the description sounded appealing.

The Road to Paradise coverRoad to Paradise by Karen Barnett

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Jill mentioned it in one of her New on the Stack posts and I fell for the cover and premise.

A False Mirror CoverA False Mirror by Charles Todd

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the Ian Rutledge series.

Cain His Brother coverCain His Brother by Anne Perry

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the William Monk series.

A Most Novel Revenge coverA Most Novel Revenge by Ashley Weaver

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the series.

Plague Land coverPlague Land by S. D. Sykes

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Jessica made it sound appealing.

The Girl Who Drank the Moon coverThe Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s gotten a ton of positive buzz.

I'd Tell You I Love You But Then I'd Have to Kill You coverI’d Tell You I Love You But Then I’d Have to Kill You by Ally Carter

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Jessica got me to do it.

A Night Divided coverA Night Divided by Jennifer A. Nielsen

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how it came to my attention, but I was intrigued by the premise. It’s not a setting that gets much attention!

Savvy coverSavvy by Ingrid Law

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I think it was Amazon that recommended it to me. 🙂


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on Your Stack (Volume 27)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


50 Great American Places coverAs soon as I saw 50 Great American Places: Essential Historic Sites Across the U.S. listed in Stacie‘s monthly post I went and added it to my Amazon wishlist. And really, it’s all I could do not to buy it immediately – it’s so exactly the sort of book I loooove and like to actually own. Plus it’s only $7.14 but I’m trying to hold off until next month as I’ve already spent my book budget for July. 🙂

Stacie also reminded me that it’s time to order a 2018 Almanac for my son – he had so much fun reading the one I got him for 2017, and that’ll mean I’ve made a start on Christmas gifts. That’ll wait until August as well though.


Six of Crows coverArwen has SO MANY BOOKS listed for last month, she makes me feel better about the ridiculous numbers I add every month as well. I’m not the only one! 🙂

I’ve added Six of Crows to my library holds list, so I’ll be giving that one a try once my turn arrives. Because it was a Kindle freebie, I grabbed The Faerie Guardian. It doesn’t sound precisely like my sort of book, but I don’t mind giving it a try, as it’ll all depend on just how much romance there is in the story.

And, despite not liking the title AT ALL, I downloaded Daemoniac, another Kindle freebie (love when they have the first in a series as a free download!) Described as Sherlock Holmes meets the X-Files, this could be the best thing ever or a travesty. I’m hoping for the former.

Arwen was full of ideas for how to get free books this month, so I also signed up for author newsletters from Aaron Galvin and Jason Paul Rice, and received copies of their books Salted and Two Heads, Two Spikes.


The Boy is Back coverWhile it is completely not my usual genre, I am soooo tempted by The Boy is Back, because Kate tells me that it’s epistolary fiction! My love for that style of book might be enough for me to read it, or at least give it a try. I’ve already got it on hold at the library.

I’m also somewhat tempted by The Fifth Letter, by Nicola Moriarty, especially because I’ve liked books by both of her sisters (What Alice Forgot and Big Little Lies by Liane, and Feeling Sorry for Celia by Jaclyn).


Counted with the Stars coverJill got me to download another Kindle freebie – Counted with the Stars. I do like historical fiction, although I’m concerned that this one may skew towards the romance side. I’ll give it a try however, as it’s the first in a trilogy so if I like it I’ll have two more to look forward to reading!


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!