Birthday Books for My Birthday Girl

My baby turns 2 today, so it’s a perfect time to add favorite books to our own collection. We added:

The Pout Pout Fish

The Pout-Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen, illustrated by Dan Hanna. She loves this book. She’s been missing it since I took it back to the library last month, and I’m sure she’ll be thrilled to have it back.

Moo

Moo! by David LaRochelle, illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka. All the kids like this one – it’s so much fun.

Kitten's First Full Moon

Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes. I’ve been meaning to buy this since my oldest was a baby, and I finally am. He helped me open the box when these arrived yesterday and was so happy to see this one in the stack for her.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: For the Love by Jen Hatmaker
Two years ago: Blog Break, New Baby Edition

The Best Kids Books (I Read for Myself) in 2015

Last week I shared my favorite books from 2015, and this post was originally going to feature all of the best children’s books I read in 2015 – board books, picture books, readalouds, and the ones I read for myself.

Except 2015 was a knockout year with great kid lit, and I needed to split it up so it’s not completely ridiculous.

So, today is all about the books I picked and read for myself. Not books I read to a child or three – these were my reads.

The Year of Miss AgnesThe Year of Miss AgnesThe Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill by Kirkpatrick Hill

A reread in preparation for the online kids book club I’m doing with Jessica (Quirky Bookworm). I adored this book the first time I read it, and suggested it for our Arctic theme. Then I was scared that it wouldn’t hold up well to rereading, or what if people hated it?

Well, so far everyone who has commented about it has said they’ve enjoyed it (yay!) and I loved it just as much the second time through. It’s heartwarming and inspiring, and all around a lovely read.

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon
Where the Mountain Meets the MoonWhere the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin
by Grace Lin

Also read when it was a possibility for that book club (we ended up not selecting China as a theme this year). It’s gorgeously written, and charmingly illustrated – go for the print version, not the electronic as I did, or you’ll miss out on some of the illustration details. Loved, loved, loved it.

The War that Saved My LifeThe War that Saved My LifeThe War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

An uplifting look at World War II evacuees, and how being sent away from London ended up being the best thing to happen to one girl. It’s heart-rending but ultimately hopeful. Because of the descriptions of abuse that Ada suffers I wouldn’t advise it for younger readers, but for those emotionally ready to read it, it’s a fantastic book.

Inside Out and Back AgainInside Out and Back AgainInside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai by Thanhha Lai

A heartbreaking account, beautifully written in verse that manages to make the semi-autobiographical story emotionally easier to read. Well-deserved winner of the National Book Award and a Newbery Honor Book.

Listen SlowlyListen, SlowlyListen, Slowly by Thanhha Lai by Thanhha Lai

Yes, a second book by the Thanhha Lai. Unlike Inside Out and Back Again, this is written in prose, and she is just as adept in that form. It’s a captivating story, with lots of appealing characters, that brings contemporary Vietnam to life.

Sparrow RoadSparrow RoadSparrow Road by Sheila O'Connor by Sheila O’Connor

Relationship-focused middle grade book with beautiful language and appealing characters. I like how it’s got a bit more depth in the content than some books I’d recommend to early elementary readers, while still being gentle enough for all but the most precocious of readers.

Goodbye StrangerGoodbye StrangerGoodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead by Rebecca Stead

Precocious reader alert: because of some of the topics addressed (including bullying and sexting), this isn’t one you’ll want to hand off to younger readers, but it’s a wonderfully written tale for those old enough for the content. It’s not as amazing as Stead’s When You Reach Me, but it’s still a solid book.

The ThiefThe ThiefThe Thief (The Queen's Thief, Book 1) by Megan Whalen Turner by Megan Whalen Turner

(a reread)

It still is one of my favorites, and I gave away my copy this year and may need to replace it soon so I can read it another time. 🙂 If you’re new to this series, don’t give up on this one – it has a slow start – but ultimately it is so good. Vaguely historical in feel, with some fantasy elements as well, and flashes of humor add up to a winning read.

When You Reach MeWhen You Reach MeWhen You Reach Me (Yearling Newbery) by Rebecca Stead by Rebecca Stead

(A reread for book club)

Possibly even better as a reread, as you know what’s going to happen, and can appreciate the clues Stead weaves throughout the text. No more details, lest I slip and give spoilers, but READ THIS BOOK.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

15 Favorite Books of 2015

Favorite Books of 2015

These are my standout reads for the year – they’re not necessarily all 5-Star books, but they’re the ones I most enjoyed reading and want to recommend.

Fiction

  1. Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen (my pseudo-review)
  2. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas (my post introducing it for book club)
  3. The Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows (my review)
  4. Winter by Marissa Meyer (my review)
  5. The Martian by Andy Weir (my review)
  6. Rules of Civility by Amor Towles (my review)
  7. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie (my review)
  8. Thirteen Problems by Agatha Christie (my review)
  9. Nonfiction

  10. For the Love by Jen Hatmaker (my review)
  11. Cold Tangerines by Shauna Niequist (my review)
  12. As You Wish by Cary Elwes (my review)
  13. The Road from Coorain by Jill Ker Conway (my review)
  14. My Kitchen Year by Ruth Reichl
  15. Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin (my review)
  16. The Center Cannot Hold by Elyn Saks (my review)

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: The Weed That Strings the Hangman’s Bag by Alan Bradley
Two years ago: Mini Reviews: The Code of Love and Happy Money
Three years ago: Favorite Books of 2012

Favorite Books of 2015 (So Far)

Favorite Books of 2015 so farQuick looks at my what are so far my favorite books of 2015, since it’s close enough to halfway through the year. 🙂 Links go to my previous posts if I’ve written one, Amazon if I haven’t.

Nonfiction

As You WishAs You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes

I don’t generally read celebrity bios, but made an exception for this one, and am so glad I did. It’s funny and witty and oh so entertaining. Perhaps because it’s more the story of a movie, than the story of just a celebrity. Read it and then read The Princess Bride. And then watch the movie. Actually, skip reading it and go for the audible versionAs You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes – it’s fantastic!

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying UpThe Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Not sure if it really will be life-changing, but so far I think it just might be. Love the tone of this one, and how it is so gentle and kind. I also love her change in focus from what you’re discarding, to what you’re keeping.

Better Than BeforeBetter Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives by Gretchen Rubin

I love her style and approach, and I love the focus of this book: how can I change my habits to change my life? It combines nicely with Kondo’s book too.

Cold TangerinesCold Tangerines: Celebrating the Extraordinary Nature of Everyday Life by Shauna Niequist

She’s one of my favorite authors, and I finally read her first book. Not as good as her more recent titles (you can see how she’s grown as an author), but still an excellent memoir of sorts.

The Road from CoorainThe Road from Coorain by Jill Ker Conway

A re-read for my book club, and it was just as good the second time around. It also made for a fabulous discussion at book club – one of the best ones we’ve had in awhile. Highly recommended if your book club reads memoirs!


Fiction

The Truth According to UsThe Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows

Loved this book. Don’t be put off by the length – it’s captivating and reads much quicker than you’d think almost 500 pages could possibly. You’ll feel like you’re there with them in Depression-era West Virginia, and you’ll appreciate air conditioning so very much.

The Thirteen ProblemsThe Thirteen Problems by Agatha Christie

Short stories featuring Miss Marple. I’m slowly working my way through all of Agatha Christie’s books and I can’t decide if I’m annoyed at myself for waiting so long to read them, or delighted that I have so many still to look forward to reading.

The Murder of Roger AckroydThe Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

More Christie, but this one features Detective Hercule Poirot. Perhaps her most famous of mysteries, and I loved figuring it out before it was revealed. She is so good at writing compelling stories without lots of extra padding.


Favorite Kids Books:

The War that Saved My LifeThe War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

A look at the children evacuated from London during WWII, but it takes a different perspective than you might expect. Hard to read at times because of tough content, it’s well worth the emotional effort, and I appreciated that the author skipped any easy resolutions that would have felt unrealistic.

National Geographic Kids Animal StoriesNational Geographic Kids Animal Stories: Heartwarming True Tales from the Animal KingdomNational Geographic Kids Animal Stories: Heartwarming True Tales from the Animal Kingdom by Jane Yolen and Heidi E. Y. Stemple, Adam Stemple, and Jason Stemple; illustrated by Jui Ishida by Jane Yolen and Heidi E. Y. Stemple, Adam Stemple, and Jason Stemple; illustrated by Jui Ishida

Gorgeously illustrated and engagingly written, this would make a great readaloud for any animal-loving children. Or it makes for a great book for any older kids or adults too, as I read it through the first time on my own, as I was deciding whether or not to read it to my kids. Fascinating looks at some animals in history.

Book of a Thousand DaysBook of a Thousand Days by Shannon Hale

A retelling of a not-very-familiar fairy tale. Well-written and engrossing, with a very satisfying ending. I loved the characters in this one, and how Hale manages to make the story her own, while still basing it so much on the original tale.

Inside Out and Back AgainInside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

Written in verse, this is another one that has tough content, although the format softens it a bit. Absolutely compelling.

Listen SlowlyListen, SlowlyListen, Slowly by Thanhha Lai by Thanhha Lai

Another gorgeously-written book by Lai, although this one is in prose, not verse. I kept wanting this to be more obviously connected with the previous book but it’s not. No matter – it’s still a wonderful story.

Winnie the PoohWinnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne

A classic for a reason. Loved reading it aloud to my children, and they loved hearing the stories.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Favorite Books of 2014

Favorite Books of 2014I had a really difficult time picking my favorite books this year, so I eventually settled on picking the books I most highly recommend to others, or the ones wish I could still experience for the first time. And because picking was so difficult, I added some runner-ups.

(Links go to my reviews if I’ve written one, Amazon if I haven’t yet)

Velma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in Leeway by Vinita Hampton Wright

If I had to pick one single favorite book of the year, it would probably be this one. I think I need to reread this one next year, just so I can more fully appreciate the way she wove this story together.

A Tree Grows in BrooklynA Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

I was convinced this book would be boring. I was wrong.

Crossing to SafetyCrossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner

Surprised myself by liking this one as much as I did, and describing it does not do it justice. Wonderful characters who stay with you long after you’ve finished reading the book.

Burnt Toast Makes You Sing GoodBurnt Toast Makes You Sing Good: A Memoir of Food and Love from an American Midwest Family by Kathleen Flinn

I’ve loved Flinn’s other books, and loved how this one brought to life her family’s stories, and led into the events in her first book. Did I like it more because I now live in the Midwest? Possibly, but I don’t think that was the only appeal.

Mastering the Art of French EatingMastering the Art of French Eating: Lessons in Food and Love from a Year in Paris by Ann Mah

Armchair traveling at its best. Mah allowed me to come along with her as she spent a year in Paris and traveled throughout France experiencing it’s most iconic food. Prepare to be hungry as you read it.

Buried in the SkyBuried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2′s Deadliest Day by Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan

The focus on the Sherpas is what makes this book so wonderfully fascinating. If you’ve liked other Everest accounts, don’t miss this one, with its unique perspective on the events of that deadly climbing season.

The Queen of AttoliaThe Queen of Attolia and The King of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner, from The Queen’s Thief series

I’ve been holding off on reading book #4, because then I won’t have another one to look forward to for the forseeable future. And that’s a very sad thing.

CressCress by Marissa Meyer, from the Lunar Chronicles series

Can’t wait to read the final two in this series!

Etiquette and EspionageEtiquette &Espionage, Curtsies & ConspiraciesCurtsies & Conspiracies (Finishing School Book 2) by Gail Carriger, and Waistcoats & WeaponryWaistcoats & Weaponry (Finishing School #3) by Gail Carriger by Gail Carriger, from the Finishing School series

Super fun series, although book #3 took a more serious turn that I wasn’t completely expecting. The final book come out next year.

The Runner-Ups

Parnassus on WheelsParnassus On WheelsParnassus On Wheels by Christopher Morley by Christopher Morley

Another one where the descriptions don’t convey how enjoyable the book is. Sweet and gentle and very easy to read. I only just read it last week, which is why I hesitate to say that it would have the staying power to be a favorite for the year. I may regret not including it.

The Mislaid MagicianThe Mislaid Magician by Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer, from the Cecelia and Kate series

Epistolary + fantasy + historical fiction = my kind of fun.

Women Heroes of World War IWomen Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics and Women Heroes of WWII: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue both by Kathryn Atwood

If you like one you’ll like the other, and if you’re at all interested in brief biographical accounts of fascinating individuals, you should give these a try.

Eiffel's TowerEiffel’s Tower: The Thrilling Story Behind Paris’s Beloved Monument and the Extraordinary World’s Fair That Introduced It by Jill Jonnes

I’m already second-guessing myself for not including it above, but I think it just misses out on being a “must recommend to everyone I know” type book. It really was a great book though.

The Professor and the MadmanThe Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester

Like the Eiffel’s Tower book, this is another fascinating look at a small slice of history. I loved it.

The Night Circus
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Another one I may need to reread, to see what clues the author drops throughout the text as to what will be happening later.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Favorite Books from the First Half of 2014 – Twitterature-Style

The year is more than half over, so it’s a perfect time to look back at the best books of 2014. Links go to my reviews if I’ve published one, or to Amazon if I haven’t.

Nonfiction

Women Heroes of World War IIWomen Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue by Kathryn J. Atwood

Fascinating look at women who worked to defeat the Nazis in various ways. I’m about to start her similar book focusing on World War IWomen Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics (Women of Action) by Kathryn Atwood, and I’ve got high hopes for it.

Buried in the SkyBuried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2’s Deadliest Day by Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan

Gripping account, and I loved the emphasis this account gives to the Sherpa climbers.

Frozen in TimeFrozen in Time: An Epic Story of Survival and a Modern Quest for Lost Heroes of World War II by Mitchell Zuckoff

Compelling look at both the historical events, and the modern search. If you don’t already know the outcome, try not to spoil yourself by searching online for details.

Mastering the Art of French EatingMastering the Art of French Eating: Lessons in Food and Love from a Year in Paris by Ann Mah

If you love food memoirs, this is a phenomenal one. And if you think you don’t like food memoirs, this one might change your mind.

The Professor and the MadmanThe Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English DictionaryThe Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester by Simon Winchester

Yes, it’s an account about the writing of the dictionary, but don’t let that stop you from trying this fascinating tale. A great book club pick too!

And a Runner-Up:
Courage Has No ColorCourage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles, America’s First Black Paratroopers by Tanya Lee Stone

Written for kids, this is still worth reading by adults, and missed being one of my absolute favorites only because the lack of depth kept me wanting a bit more.

Fiction

Velma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in Leeway by Vinita Hampton Wright

Loved the story-telling, loved Velma, loved it all, even though it made me cry.

The Secret KeeperThe Secret Keeper by Kate Morton

Follows Morton’s typical pattern for her novels – alternating story lines between historic and contemporary events; a mystery; strong, well-developed female characters. Just because it’s her sort of book doesn’t mean it’s not worth reading – it was terrific.

Crossing to SafetyCrossing to SafetyCrossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner by Wallace Stegner

Another great book club pick, with my full review publishing tomorrow (it’s now published!). Slow start but oh so worth reading.

The Paradox Series by Rachel Bach – ÂśFortune's Pawn (Paradox Book 1) by Rachel BachFortune’s Pawn, Honor’s Knight, and Heaven’s QueenHeaven's Queen (Paradox Book 3) by Rachel Bach

The series that convinced me I might like science fiction.

And a Runner-Up:
The Divorce PapersThe Divorce Papers by Susan Rieger

Not at all what I was expecting, but oddly fascinating. I read it in one night, staying up way past bedtime because I couldn’t put it down.

Young Adult/Juvenile Titles

CressCressCress (Lunar Chronicles book 3) by Marissa Meyer reviewed by @SheilaRCraig by Marissa Meyer

Love this fantasy series so much – the fairy-tale retellings are well done, and she’s got me so hooked on the story I can hardly wait for the final book to come out next year.

Princess AcademyPrincess AcademyPrincess Academy by Shannon Hale by Shannon Hale

Fun fantasy story, and one of these days I will finish the sequel.

The Queen of AttoliaQueen of AttoliaThe Queen of Attolia (The Queen's Thief, Book 2) by Megan Whalen Turner and The King of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner

Books 2 and 3 in a series, and it has been so enjoyable. I’m intentionally waiting to read book 4, because I want to savor the anticipation a little bit longer. Another one for fantasy fans.

The Impossible Knife of MemoryThe Impossible Knife of MemoryThe Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson by Laurie Halse Anderson

Hard to read because of the subject matter, but she is such a wonderful writer.

And a Runner-Up:
Jenny of the TetonsJenny of the TetonsJenny of the Tetons (Great Episodes) by Kristiana Gregory by Kristiana Gregory

Based on a true story, I wanted more from this account, but what is there is compelling historical fiction.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

recent cookbook reads, twitterature-style

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Best Books of 2013

Today I’m sharing the books I thought were the best-of-the-best for the entire year. I read 232 books for the year, so there were a lot of choices, but I’ve managed to cull it down to six per category. It kind of pains me the great books that just missed out being included!

Best Nonfiction:

Best Books of 2013 Nonfiction

Best Fiction

Best Books of 2013 Fiction

Best Picture Books

Best Books of 2013 Picture Books

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Most Memorable Books

I’m taking a mini blog break but instead of having no posts at all, I’m sharing some content that originally ran on another blog I had. I’ve updated the posts, but if you’ve been reading me for a long time, they may still be familiar.

Last year Anne from a Modern Mrs. Darcy had a “The Book That Changed My Life” Carnival. I didn’t participate because I couldn’t really think of a book that struck me as “This Book Changed Me.” But it did get me thinking of what books have been the most memorable.

Most Memorable BooksMost Memorable Books

  1. All those kid’s books that my mom read overandoverandover. Nope, no specific names here, because there were so many. I’ve got pictures of me as a toddler hefting a pile of books almost as big as me. I’ve got a picture of me passed out in the chair surrounded by books. I’ve even got a picture of me on the little kid potty, reading books.

    I wanted my mom to read those books so many times that she finally made her own books on tape, complete with a little chime to tell me when to turn the page. I would listen to them endlessly, so much so that I learned to read when I was barely 3 just from sheer repetition. A relative thought I’d simply memorized those books, and brought out new ones to test me. To her shock, it confirmed that I was really reading!

    Pure determination and desire (and a lot of repetition by my mom) opened up the world of books to me long before I’d have learned in school. It may be cheating because I don’t remember all the specific titles, but as a group the story of how I learned to read has entered family lore, as has the early start to my reading addiction.
  2. Little House on the Prairie

  3. The Little House on the Prairie seriesLaura Ingalls Wilder's Little House on the Prairie series - one of my most memorable books. The books, not the TV series, which I always hated because of how it departed from the books.

    I read these countless times as a child, and certain scenes have stuck with me. Laura and her family using their coffee grinder to prepare the wheat for their small daily ration of bread in The Long WinterThe Long Winter - one of my most memorable books. All the glorious food described in Farmer BoyFarmer Boy - one of my most memorable books. Jack the brindle bulldog trotting along beneath their wagon as they traveled west.

    I’m anxious to share these stories with my children, and I hope they love them as much as I did.
  4. Anne of Green Gables

  5. Anne of Green GablesLucy Maud Montgomery's The Complete Anne of Green Gables Boxed Set (Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, ... Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside). I’m still determined to travel to Prince Edward Island someday so I can see the setting for this book and the others by L. M. Montgomery. Anne was so real to me, and her books made me long to have a close friend like her. I’m glad I have a daughter to share this book with her someday. And while I liked all of the seriesLucy Maud Montgomery's The Complete Anne of Green Gables Boxed Set (Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, Anne of Windy Poplars, Anne's House of Dreams, ... Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside) well enough, the first bookAnne of Green Gables - one of my most memorable books was definitely my favorite.
  6. Jane Eyre

  7. Jane EyreCharlotte BrontĂ«'s Jane Eyre - one of my most memorable books. I read this as a fairly young child (around 3rd grade), and to this day I remember the shock some people expressed when they found out I was reading it. I didn’t get the surprise – there was nothing that complicated to understand in the book, and it had such an exciting ending. I did reread it a few years ago, to see how I liked it as an adult, and yes I missed some of the subtleties, but it’s still not anything I would say I shouldn’t have been reading, which is the impression I remember getting.
  8. All Creatures Great and Small

  9. The James Herriot books (All Creatures Great and SmallJames Herriot's All Creatures Great and Small - one of my most memorable books, All Things Bright and BeautifulJames Herriot's All Things Bright and Beautiful (All Creatures Great and Small series) - one of my most memorable books, All Things Wise and WonderfulJames Herriot's All Things Wise and Wonderful (All Creatures Great and Small series) - one of my most memorable books, The Lord God Made Them AllJames Herriot's The Lord God Made Them All (All Creatures Great and Small series) - one of my most memorable books, and Every Living ThingJames Herriot's Every Living Thing (All Creatures Great and Small series) - one of my most memorable books). My mom got me started on these books, and she used to read one chapter a night. I’ve never had any interest in being a vet, certainly not a large animal vet in the Yorkshire Dales, but these books transported me. I still own them, and hope that my children like hearing them all, one chapter at a time.
  10. The Distant Summer

  11. The Distant SummerSarah Patterson's The Distant Summer - one of my most memorable books by Sarah Patterson. I first read this as a teen or maybe even a pre-teen as a Reader’s Digest Condensed Book. I’m somewhat embarrassed to admit how much I adored this story. It’s a sappy love story! Sappy love story or not, I read it multiple times, and have never forgotten the story or characters – it’s definitely one of my guilty reading pleasures! I’ve always wondered if I would still love it as an adult, so writing this post made me curious enough to order the book (long out of print, there are used copies available). I’m somewhat scared to see if reading it now will taint my fond memories, but I’m going to try it anyway. Someday.
  12. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

  13. The Harry Potter seriesJ K Rowling's Harry Potter series - one of my most memorable books. I was an adult when I read this series, but it’s so special to me because of my grandmother. She loved to read and in the last years of her life, when she was unable to get out much, I would do my best to keep her well stocked with reading material. As her eyesight continued to diminish, she got pickier and pickier about what she would read; it had to be worth the effort, and she knew she only had so many more books left that she’d get to.

    Harry Potter made the cut, and we would both anxiously await the newest volume. I bought very few new books, especially fiction, but made an exception for Harry. There was no way we’d be able to wait to get a copy from the library!

    I think I was more upset than my grandmother when book 6Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Book 6), was too heavy for her to hold, and so remained unread. She died before the final bookHarry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7) - one of my most memorable books was ever published.

    I still love Harry Potter not just for the great story, but because it reminds me of my adored grandmother and how much she enjoyed it. And what a kick she got out of reading those “kids books.”

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!