Twitterature May 2014

Twitterature

Holey, Wholly, HolyHoley, Wholly, Holy: A Lenten Journey of RefinementHoley, Wholly, Holy: A Lenten Journey of Refinement by Kris Camealy by Kris Camealy

Very reflective book that could work any time of year, not just during Lent.

The Enneagram Made EasyThe Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the 9 Types of PeopleThe Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the 9 Types of People by Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele by Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele

Loved this easy-to-understand look at the Enneagram. And now I know I’m a 5.

My Name's Not SusieMy Name’s Not Susie: A Life Transformed by LiteracyMy Name's Not Susie: A Life Transformed by Literacy by Sharon Jean Hamilton by Sharon Jean Hamilton

Hard to read at times, as she had a difficult upbringing. I enjoyed the memoir aspects more than the literacy narrative.

Best 100 Juices for KidsBest 100 Juices for Kids: Totally Yummy, Awesomely Healthy, & Naturally Sweetened Homemade Alternatives to Soda Pop, Sports Drinks, and Expensive Bottled JuicesBest 100 Juices for Kids: Totally Yummy, Awesomely Healthy, & Naturally Sweetened Homemade Alternatives to Soda Pop, Sports Drinks, and Expensive Bottled Juices by Jessica Fisher by Jessica Fisher

We’ve tried a couple of the smoothie recipes already, and one was a big hit (the other I should have modified a bit more to our tastes). Am sorely tempted to buy a juicer so I can try some of the juice mixtures as well.

What Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and MarriageWhat Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and Marriage: Lessons for People from Animals and Their TrainersWhat Shamu Taught Me About Life, Love, and Marriage: Lessons for People from Animals and Their Trainers by Amy Sutherland by Amy Sutherland

Short and readable and very enjoyable look at applying some animal training methods to human relationships.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Recent Nonfiction Reads: Twitterature-Style

recent nonfiction reads, twitterature-style

The Southern VegetarianThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern TableThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern Table by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence

Loved this cookbook – there were tons of recipes that tempted me (unfortunately a few of the ones that were most tempting are maybe a little more work than I’ll want to put into a weeknight dish). A huge bonus to the book is that almost every recipe includes a picture – the only ones I noticed that didn’t were the “basics” in the final chapter – things like pizza dough and a dry rub, etc.

Teach a Child to Read with Children's BooksTeach a Child to Read With Children’s Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading SuccessTeach a Child to Read With Children's Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading Success by Mark B. Thogmartin by Mark B. Thogmartin

I wish I’d seen the updated version, but overall I found this one to be too much of what I already knew. If you’re new to the educational philosophy behind reading to children and methods of reading instruction, it’s a good resource. I learned to read this way, so the “yes this works!” details weren’t necessary for me, nor the specifics on why a more balanced approach vs. phonics-only or whole-language-only methods is preferable.

All Through the Day, All Through the YearAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and CelebrationsAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and Celebrations by David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutsonby David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutson

Wanted a more general look at celebrating the liturgical calendar, but this was mostly his family’s approach to it. Which … isn’t bad, just not as overall helpful as I wanted. And it might be shallow, but the format of the book was unwieldy and fairly obnoxious to hold and read.

The Internet is a PlaygroundThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online GeniusThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online Genius by David Thorne by David Thorne
While some of the chapters had me laughing almost hysterically, overall it was unevenly entertaining. I returned it to the library without finishing it, in part because wading through it for the parts I’d find amusing wasn’t worth the reading time.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Twitterature: Recent Reads about Writing

recent reads, twitterature-style

I’ve been known to get on reading jags – grabbing several books on the same topic in quick succession. Sometimes it’s completely coincidental, and other times I’m inspired by the first and can’t wait to dive into more on that topic.

This month, it’s been a little bit of both. My book club‘s picks for the month were Steven Pressfield’s books The War of ArtThe War of Art by Steven Pressfield and Do the WorkDo the Work by Steven Pressfield, and I also had a review book with a deadline, Tricia Goyer’s Balanced: Finding Center as a Work-at-Home MomBalanced: Finding Center as a Work-at-Home Mom by Tricia Goyer. Those led to a few other writing books. I’ve already shared a longer review for Balanced, and will likely write ones for Pressfield’s and Hughes’ books. Until then, here’s a brief look at them all:

War of ArtThe War of ArtThe War of Art by Steven Pressfield and Do the WorkDo the Work by Steven Pressfield by Steven Pressfield
Generally motivating and inspiring, if a bit odd at times (could have done without the bits on evil and angels and the like). Still worth reading, especially as they’re such a quick read, although you could probably just pick one of them and get the gist of them both. In many ways, his story is the most motivating part of it (years and years and years of effort before achieving success as a writer).

BalancedBalanced: Finding Center as a Work-at-Home MomBalanced: Finding Center as a Work-at-Home Mom by Tricia Goyer by Tricia Goyer. Super practical and even more motivating and inspiring than Pressfield’s books, although that could very well be because of the whole stage-of-life thing that resonated so well for me. If you’re a work-from-home parent (especially one who writes) read it! (my full review is here)

30 Days of Writing Prompts30 Days of Writing Prompts30 Days of Writing Prompts by Richard Rohlin by Richard Rohlin. I grabbed this one while it was an Amazon freebie (it’s currently $.99) and am happy I did – while some of the prompts themselves are similar to ones you can easily find elsewhere, many of them contain additional information or tips on writing that are helpful. As well, there are some essays included in the midst of some of the prompts on topics such as “avoiding five common writing mistakes” and “how to fail at anything.” These are very good, and give the e-book additional value.

365-featured-image2365 Days of Writing Prompts. If you need still more prompts, this has them. These are more specific than the 30 Days one above (more like Three Sixty-Five below), and are dated, so January 1 is related to New Years, etc. Best of all, this one is a FREE download, so what have you got to lose?

Three-Sixty-Five-EbookThree Sixty-Five: Ideas for Blog Posts, Scrapbook Pages & Art Journal Entries by Kam Altar
Lots and lots of ideas for posts (or journals or scrapbooks). I liked how they’re grouped into themes, and if you’re stuck for an idea, this may help you out. What I don’t like is the PDF version (which is all there is) is very Kindle-unfriendly and requires constant resizing.

On Becoming a WriterOn Becoming a Writer: What Every Blogger Needs to KnowOn Becoming a Writer: What Every Blogger Needs to Know by Denise J. Hughes by Denise J. Hughes. My favorite part of this one is how it separates writing from editing in a way that many books about writing do not. It’s focused on blogging, but many of her tips would work for other types of writing, especially any sort of nonfiction writing. Loved this one.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Recent Cookbook Reads, Twitterature-Style

recent reads, twitterature-style
I love reading cookbooks, both for recipe ideas, and because some cookbooks are packed with extra information or stories. These are some of the best cookbooks I’ve finished recently:

The Smitten Kitchen CookbookThe Smitten Kitchen CookbookThe Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman by Deb Perelman
Packed with her usual gorgeous images, with stories accompanying every recipe. I stopped flagging pages where I wanted to try a dish, because there were too many. Come back on the 24th because I have way more to say about this book.

The Book of SchmaltzThe Book of Schmaltz: Love Song to a Forgotten FatThe Book of Schmaltz: Love Song to a Forgotten Fat by Michael Ruhlman by Michael Ruhlman
Yes, it’s a book about fat, but there is some history in it, and beautiful photography, and descriptions of dishes that sound so delicious that I am quite tempted to try and render my own schmaltz to try some of the recipes. If you like Ruhlman (and if you don’t, please don’t tell me), don’t be put off by the topic: it’s fascinating.

The French Market CookbookThe French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian KitchenThe French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian Kitchen by Clotilde Dusoulier by Clotilde Dusoulier
Fun to read, but I was surprised not to be that tempted by any of the specific recipes – all of them had some element or another that prevented me from wanting to try them. Lovely photographs still made it one I enjoyed before sending it back to the library.

KeepersKeepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the KitchenKeepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the Kitchen by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion
Filled with helpful tips and ideas about getting weeknight dinners on the table – I’ve flagged several I want to try. It reminded me quite a bit of Dinner: A Love Story in its format, without quite as much personal information as DALS included.

Bonne Femme CookbookThe Bonne Femme Cookbook: Simple, Splendid Food That French Women Cook Every DayThe Bonne Femme Cookbook: Simple, Splendid Food That French Women Cook Every Day by Wini Moranville by Wini Moranville
While I love the idea of many of these recipes, and the extra tidbits of information are fun and interesting, I really wish it had more (well, any) pictures – I’m so spoiled by beautifully illustrated cookbooks.

What Katie AteWhat Katie Ate: Recipes and Other Bits and PiecesWhat Katie Ate: Recipes and Other Bits and Pieces by Katie Quinn Davies by Katie Quinn Davies
The best part of this was the peek at what an Irish woman living in Australia eats for her meals. Some of her breakfast dishes were definitely not ones I’ve ever had, although if you’re more well-traveled than me (and that’s not hard to be) they’re probably quite familiar. The format of the book seems to focus on appearance rather than function, and though the photos are pretty, the text is often very hard to read.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Current Reads, Twitterature-Style

recent reads, twitterature-style

I’ve mentioned before my habit of reading multiple books at a time (it helps me read more, and balance out heavier books with lighter fare), and right now I’m in the midst of a great stretch where I’m reading multiple terrific works. What’s in my current reads stack?

Buried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2’s Deadliest DayBuried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2's Deadliest Day by Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan by Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan
Love love love this book. I’ve been trying to take my time with it so I can enjoy it for that much longer. If you’re at all interested in mountaineering tales, do not miss this one.

Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and RescueWomen Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue (Women of Action) by Kathryn Atwood by Kathryn Atwood
Really well-done, with entries on each woman that are just long enough to get you interested in learning more. Love the contextual information Atwood includes about what was going on specific to each country as well.

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern CrimeThe Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime by Judith Flanders by Judith Flanders
I wasn’t sure if this would be worth reading at over 400 pages, but so far it’s been really intriguing. Not sure if I’ll finish it though, it’ll depend on if it stays as compelling throughout.

Deadly Times: The 1910 Bombing of the Los Angeles Times and America’s Forgotten Decade of TerrorDeadly Times: The 1910 Bombing of the Los Angeles Times and America's Forgotten Decade of Terror by Lew Irwin by Lew Irwin
Strong writing highlights this look at a previously-unknown-to-me part of American history.

Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West by Dorothy Wickenden
One of the advantages of reading multiple books at a time is the unexpected connections that can appear between books. This time, it’s between Nothing Daunted (taking place in 1916), and Deadly Times (in 1910). The contrasts between the worlds described are striking.

A Duty to the DeadA Duty to the Dead (Bess Crawford Mysteries) by Charles Todd by Charles Todd
My one fiction read, and it’s set during World War I, so it also fits in well with those previous two. The pacing is a bit slow, but the main character is appealing. I think Maisie Dobbs fans would like this one.

And because I haven’t finished any of these books, a disclaimer: it’s always possible that I’ll ultimately end up deciding that the books aren’t as good as they initially promised to be. That generally isn’t an issue, especially for nonfiction books, but I do want to mention it. 🙂

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Twitterature – Recent Reads

recent reads, twitterature-style

Getting Rooted in New ZealandGetting Rooted in New ZealandGetting Rooted in New Zealand by Jamie Baywood by Jamie Baywood
Intriguing look at an American woman’s experiences working in New Zealand. The writing is choppy and occasionally repetitive, but I still enjoyed reading about what it was like for her adjusting to the new environment.

If you’re looking for a deeply reflective evaluation of life as an outsider in New Zealand, this isn’t it. It reminded me more of a night out with a group of friends, and one of them sharing tales to get a laugh out of everyone else. Some of the anecdotes she relays made me chuckle, and many made me cringe, but it was compelling enough that I’ve wondered what happened next in her story. I would have preferred the organization to be clearer – most of the time I had no idea when events were happening in relation to each other and she seemed to skip around in her recollections.

Sea-DevilSea Devil: A Delilah Duffy MysterySea Devil: A Delilah Duffy Mystery by Jessica Sherry by Jessica Sherry
An amateur-sleuth mystery with a large dash of romance (or is it a romance with a mystery as one of the major plot lines?) The main character’s quirks and obliviousness annoyed me at times, and the writing could have been tightened up a bit, but overall it was entertaining.

This type of mystery isn’t my favorite, which is the main reason for my lack of enthusiasm, so if it is one of your preferred mystery types it may be a good fit for you. The author seems to be setting things up to turn it into a series, and I think it could work well as one. Recommended for fans of the subgenre.

Glad to Be HumanGlad to Be HumanGlad to Be Human by Irene O'Garden by Irene O’Garden
Beautifully written and thought-provoking essay. It’s a list of 200 reasons she’s grateful to be alive, and it reminded me of a secular One Thousand GiftsOne Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are by Ann Voskamp (albeit much abbreviated, and in a different writing style). And ok, I’ve only read excerpts of One Thousand Gifts, so the entire book might not have reminded me of it.

It’s a quick read, but it’s also priced to take that into consideration. I loved the language and her manner of writing.

In the Shadows of GloryIn the Shadows of Glory…My NBA LifeIn the Shadows of Glory...My NBA Life by M.S. Lily Stargazer by M.S. Lily Stargazer
I wanted to like this more, but the writing is simplistic and the story-telling is lifeless. It read like she was trying so hard to be an impartial observer on events that it ends up draining away any interest. Not recommended.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: I received copies of these books from the publisher or author for review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all opinions are my own. This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Twitterature: The Tyranny of the Library Edition

Tyranny of the Library TwitteratureI recently did some rearranging of items in my house. New bookcases downstairs led to old bookcases moving upstairs letting me finally get all of my library books, in progress books, and “books that I want to read SOON” books consolidated into one area.

All that reorganizing really opened my eyes about just how many non-library books I have on my “want to read soon” shelf, and how little progress I’m still making at getting to them, thanks to library books and their pesky due dates demanding attention. Here’s hoping my theme for this month’s Twitterature post helps inspire me to get to some of these books soon.

People are Waiting for Me
  • Velma Still Cooks in LeewayVelma Still Cooks in Leeway by Vinita Hampton Wright by Vinita Hampton Wright
    Borrowed from a friend because the library doesn’t have a copy. I’d like to get it back to her soon, but without a firm due date it keeps getting pushed aside for other books.
  • Wait Till Next Year: A MemoirWait Till Next Year: A Memoir by Doris Kearns Goodwin by Doris Kearns Goodwin
    It’s my mom’s book, and she’d probably like to have it again before she forgets that she ever loaned it to me. Might already be too late for that. I loved the two books I have read by her, I love memoirs, so why am I not diving into this one?
Review Books In Limbo
  • Beyond Bath Time: Embracing Motherhood as a Sacred RoleBeyond Bath Time: Embracing Motherhood as a Sacred Role by Erin Davis by Erin Davis
    Lost this one for months and months, and discovered it buried underneath the front seat of our truck. How it got there I have absolutely no idea, but I still need to read it. And write that ridiculously overdue review.
  • MaliceMalice (The Faithful and the Fallen) by John Gwynne by John Gwynne
    Won this one, and the promo was in hopes of getting reviews, but it’s been almost a year. I love fantasy, I’m not scared of big books, so why the hesitation? No idea.
  • Deadly Times: The 1910 Bombing of the Los Angeles Times and America’s Forgotten Decade of TerrorDeadly Times: The 1910 Bombing of the Los Angeles Times and America's Forgotten Decade of Terror by Lew Irwin by Lew Irwin
    This one hasn’t been waiting too long (September I believe), and I did warn the publicist that I was backlogged on review books. Want to get to it before I start feeling embarrassed.
  • Worship: The Ultimate PriorityWorship: The Ultimate Priority by John MacArthur by John MacArthur
    Another review book that’s been waiting for well over a year. It wasn’t until after accepting it that I finally acknowledged that I generally don’t like reviewing Christian books. I’m dreading writing the review, so I haven’t even read more than the intro.
Why did I buy it if I’m not going to read it?
  • GuinevereGuinevere by Sharan Newman by Sharan Newman
    Her historical mystery seriesSharan Newman Catherine LeVendeur historical mystery series is one of my absolute favorite, and I bought this one because the library didn’t have a copy. Why am I letting it languish on my shelf??
  • The Queen of AttoliaThe Queen of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner by Megan Whalen Turner
    Read The Thief, the first in the series as part of my reading challenge, and then felt compelled to buy the sequel. Haven’t felt compelled to start reading it however. Sometimes I drive myself crazy.
  • Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian LifeSpiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life by Donald S. Whitney by Donald S. Whitney
    Skimmed a library copy of this one, enough to know that it was one that I’d want to read carefully and thoughtfully. So I keep telling myself I’m not in the mood for that sort of book.
These might win an award for “have been waiting the longest for me to finally read them.”
  • Pride and PrejudiceThe Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded Edition by Jane Austen by Jane Austen (did I really need to specify that?)
    I really liked Sense and Sensibility. It’s perhaps THE Jane Austen book I should read most of all. Think I’m scared that it’ll never live up to the expectations I have for it, as much as I am trying to keep them in check.
  • How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent ReadingHow to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading by Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren by Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren
    One I feel like I “should” read – maybe it’ll be eye-opening, or I’ll learn some tips or techniques or ideas that’ll have me wishing I’d read it ages ago. So far though, it feels like a school assignment, and I usually avoid those.
  • PaperQuake: A PuzzlePaperQuake: A Puzzle by Kathryn Reiss by Kathryn Reiss
    Has been on my kid lit shelf for decades – no, I’m not kidding. Want to get it read to decide if it’s worthy of keeping that space, or if it should get the boot.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

recent reads, twitterature-style

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

31 Days of Great Nonfiction, Twitterature-Style

31 Days of Great Nonfiction, Twitterature-Style

I’m combining two themes this month: Twitterature (quick looks at books) and 31 Days of Great Nonfiction. What do they create when I put them together? A round up of the great nonfiction I’ve already posted about this year. These are all too good to not be mentioned in the overall series!

Food memoirs

I Love Food Memoirs
  • Bread and Wine by Shauna Niequist. Fabulous food memoir, and her recipes are delicious too.
  • Dinner a Love Story by Jenny Rosenstrach. Yes, it’s a cookbook, but it’s got a lot of stories to go with it.
  • Kitchen Counter Cooking School by Kathleen Flinn. If this doesn’t make you want to get into your kitchen and start cooking, I’ll be surprised.

Recommend with Cautions

Great Books, But Recommended with Cautions
  • Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth. Like the TV show? The books are fabulous too.
  • Death’s Acre by Bill Bass and Jon Jefferson. Not for the squeamish, but fascinating look at forensic anthropology and related fields.
  • Under a Flaming Sky by Daniel James Brown. Astonishing story, well-written and engaging, but because of the horrific events it relates it can be tough to read.

Inspiration

Need Some Inspiration?
  • Memoir Project by Marion Roach Smith. Excellent book on writing memoirs, but it’s a great book for any sort of writing.
  • The 7 Experiment by Jen Hatmaker. Great ideas for doing your own 7 experiment.
Is it a Memoir? Is it a Travelogue? Either way, it’s charming.
  • Apple of My Eye by Helene Hanff. A touristy look at New York by a native. It might make you cry a bit too.

31 Days of Great NonfictionAnd if you still want more great nonfiction? Visit this year’s series page, or check out last year’s series: 31 Days of Great Nonfiction Reads.

For more quick looks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs Darcy’s link-up!

Twitterature: Recent Christian Reads

recent reads, twitterature-style

Ages ago I signed up for various blogger book-review programs. One of the main things I learned from those programs was that, in general, I don’t like reviewing Christian books. I still owe a review for the last book I accepted from one program, and I’ve got a number of other books that I’ve read recently that I never reviewed (all library books or my own, so my procrastination isn’t as bad as with that one.) This latest Twitterature linkup was a perfect goad for me to try and get as many of them off my “to review” list as possible. 🙂

Thought-Provoking and I’m Very Glad I Read
  • The Blue Parakeet: Rethinking How You Read the BibleScot McKnight's The Blue Parakeet: Rethinking How You Read the Bible by Scot McKnight.
    Understandable and thoughtful look at how to read the bible. Loved his specific examples of how everyone picks and chooses what to take literally in their interpretations. If you like Rachel Held Evans, you’ll likely like this one. If you don’t like her, you’re probably already scandalized that I enjoyed this one.
  • Holy Ambition: Turning God-Shaped Dreams Into RealityChip Ingram's Holy Ambition: Turning God-Shaped Dreams Into Reality by Chip Ingram
    Practical, inspiring, motivating. Oh, and he bases his concepts on Nehemiah. Love that. (I read the older edition, but the revised edition I’ve linked to doesn’t seem to have substantive changes).
Worth Reading, but won’t ever read it again
Didn’t Do Much For Me
  • Love Does: Discover a Secretly Incredible Life in an Ordinary WorldBob Goff's Love Does: Discover a Secretly Incredible Life in an Ordinary World by Bob Goff.
    I expected to love this book after “meeting” Goff in Donald Miller’s book A Million Miles in a Thousand YearsA Million Miles in a Thousand Years: How I Learned to Live a Better Story. Instead I feel like the highlights I got from Miller’s book were enough, and Goff’s own book ended up feeling repetitive and tiresome. Maybe I just don’t relate to him? Some of his antics seemed juvenile rather than whimsical, and irresponsible rather than spontaneous. It’s also very Christian-lite, and his subtitle doesn’t match the text. His story isn’t something most people can replicate, unless they also are super wealthy. I’m sure he’d be fun to have coffee with – his stories are amazing. His book though? Disappointing.
  • Your Signature Life: Pursuing God’s Best Every DayDianna Booher's Your Signature Life: Pursuing God's Best Every Day by Dianna Booher.
    Like the premise of it – the importance of giving my best to all the small and seemingly insignificant details of daily life. Not sure why it didn’t engage me more than it did, but I plodded through it.
  • Sabbath: The Ancient Practices (Ancient Practices Series)Dan Allender's Sabbath: The Ancient Practices (Ancient Practices Series) by Dan Allender.
    Wanted to like it, but found the writing to be really dull and repetitive.
Never Finished

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Recent Reads, Twitterature-Style

recent reads, twitterature-style

Some of the books I’ve finished recently. Many are ones I haven’t liked all that much, because if I love a book, I usually want to write a full review!

Mostly Glad I Read ’em
  • One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen WayOne Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way
    Like the principles discussed, but for such a short book it was still quite repetitive.
  • Glamping with MaryJane: Glamour + CampingGlamping with MaryJane: Glamour + Camping
    So much fun, and loved the pictures. If you’re at all interested in vintage travel trailers, or non-roughing-it-camping, grab this book.
  • A Change of FortuneA Change of Fortune
    I shouldn’t have liked this as much as I did. It’s a romance, the historical details miss the mark quite a bit, the suspense isn’t very suspenseful, the plotting is absurd, and some of the dialogue is super contrived (especially when talking about God). Inexplicably, I still enjoyed it as a light and fluffy bit of entertainment. It’s one that the mood has to be just right for this to be amusing instead of annoying.
It’s Not You, It’s Me
  • Stepping HeavenwardStepping Heavenward
    A beloved book for many, I didn’t care for it, and wondered if I’d have appreciated it if I’d first read it as a teen.
  • Mouse Guard: The Black AxeMouse Guard: The Black Axe
    This series has gotten rave reviews for it’s historical-inspired setting and fantastic artwork. If you like graphic novels, I think you’ll love it. I’m ready to concede that I just don’t like graphic novels.
  • Two Views of Hell: A Biblical & Theological DialogueTwo Views of Hell: A Biblical & Theological Dialogue
    Liked the format, but thought the one author was needlessly personal and fairly obnoxious in some of his retorts. Also, apparently I’m really not that interested in theological debates because some of the finer points of the discussion had me wondering why I should care.
Can I Have That Reading Time Back
  • In the Shadow of the GlacierIn the Shadow of the Glacier (Constable Molly Smith)
    Likeable main character, but a poor mystery and dull story-telling. May give another book in the series a chance to see if the plotting has improved.
  • OCD, The Dude, and MeOCD, The Dude, and Me
    Started off with a lot of promise (epistolary fiction! love it!) but by the end I was almost rolling my eyes at the cliches and so-obvious-it’s-painful plot twist(s). Wish I hadn’t bothered.
  • The Partly Cloudy PatriotThe Partly Cloudy Patriot
    Wanted a lot more history in the essays, or a true memoir. Didn’t like the mish-mash of history/memoir/politics, and found her voice to be pretentious and annoying. I get it, you’re super smart and nerdy in a good way and love books and history.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!