2016 Reading Goals

My Reading Goals for this year are simple:

The Deliberate Reader 2016 Book Club Picks | One of my 2016 Reading Goals

1. Read all of my book club books.

This year that means three book clubs and their picks – my in-person one, my blog one, and the kid lit one I’m hosting with Jessica. That’s 36 books, plus 12 picture books.

RTFEBC | One of my 2016 Reading Goals

2. Read books to fit with Modern Mrs Darcy’s reading challenge.

Last year I had fun fitting my books into her categories, so I’m ready to try that again. have these all selected, except for the “book that intimidates you.” Books don’t really intimidate me, so I’m not certain what to pick for this – I’m thinking through ways to adapt/adjust this category to make it more applicable to me. Or if you’ve got some suggestions for it, I’d be happy to hear them.

MMD-2016-Reading-Challenge | One of my 2016 Reading Goals

3. Read the Bible.

I’ve gotten out of the habit, and want to get that re-established.

2015 Reading Challenges: The Results

The year is all but over, so it’s time to check in and see how I did on my reading challenges. The only one I “officially” planned on doing is Modern Mrs. Darcy’s, but halfway through the year I decided to see how close I could get to completing Book Riot’s challenge.

Like the idea of a reading challenge? Modern Mrs. Darcy just announced hers for 2016, and Book Riot is also having one again. There’s also Tim Challies’ reading challenge, which is tiered to match your reading ambitions – anywhere from 13 to 104 books. I’m considering posting about how the books from my book club can help you fit these challenges. 🙂 Happy reading!

2015 MMD Reading Challenge Completed

Modern Mrs Darcy’s 2015 Reading Challenge

I completed this one fairly easily – the categories were pretty broad. It was fun to think about it though!

  1. a book you’ve been meaning to readPride & Prejudice by Jane Austen
  2. a book published this yearThe Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows
  3. a book in a genre you don’t typically readConspiracy 365: January by Gabrielle Lord
  4. a book from your childhoodThe Princess BrideThe Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman by William Goldman
  5. a book your mom loves84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
  6. a book that was originally written in a different languageHeidi by Johanna Spyri
  7. a book “everyone” has read but youSeabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand
  8. a book you choose because of the coverSeraphina by Rachel Hartman
  9. a book by a favorite authorCold Tangerines by Shauna Niequist
  10. a book recommended by someone with great tasteRules of Civility by Amor Towles
  11. a book you should have read in high schoolEnder’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  12. a book currently on the bestseller listAs You Wish by Cary Elwes

Book Riot’s 2015 Read Harder Challenge

  1. A book written by someone when they were under the age of 25My Father’s DragonMy Father's Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett by Ruth Stiles Gannett (who was 25 when this was published, so I’m assuming it was written when she was under 25.)
  2. A book written by someone when they were over the age of 65National Geographic Kids Animal Stories coauthored by Jane Yolen
  3. A collection of short storiesThe Thirteen Problem by Agatha Christie
  4. A book published by an indie press – Not entirely sure this counts, but The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz is published by Candlewick Press, which technically is an independent publisher, although it may be bigger than what Book Riot had in mind for this. But they’re not part of one of the big publishing conglomerates.
  5. A book by someone that identifies as LGBTQBorn Round by Frank Bruni (finished on the 29th of December, just in time to qualify for this challenge, as it was the last one I needed a book to fill.)
  6. A book by a person whose gender is different from your ownI Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley
  7. A book that takes place in Asia -I’ve got the nonfiction The Lady and the Panda, which mostly takes place in China, and the YA title Listen, Slowly, which is set in Vietnam.
  8. A book by an author from Africa – I read the children’s book Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke, who is originally from Nigeria.
  9. A book that is by or about someone from an indigenous culture – I reread the children’s book The Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill, set in an Athabascan village in remote Alaska.
  10. A microhistoryGhost Map by Steven Johnson (maybe stretching the definition of microhistory here)
  11. A YA novel – so many to choose from here so I’ll just list the last one I read – Winter by Marissa Meyer.
  12. A sci-fi novelEnder’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  13. A romance novelEnchanted, Inc.Enchanted, Inc. (Katie Chandler, Book 1) by Shanna Swendson by Shanna Swendson
  14. A NBA, MBP or Pulitzer Prize winner – Not technically a winner, but I’m still going to count Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin, which was a finalist in 2014.
  15. A book that is a retelling of a classic storyBook of a Thousand Days by Shannon Hale
  16. An audiobookAs You Wish by Cary Elwes. Although I didn’t listen to it 100%.
  17. A collection of poetry – if kids’ poetry counts, I’ve read Eric Carle’s Animals AnimalsEric Carle's Animals Animals
  18. A book that someone else has recommended to youThe Best Yes: Making Wise Decisions in the Midst of Endless DemandsThe Best Yes: Making Wise Decisions in the Midst of Endless Demands by Lysa TerKeurst by Lysa TerKeurst
  19. A book that was originally published in another languageThe Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
  20. A graphic novel or a graphic memoir – Does a kids’ graphic novel count? I read A Journey through the Digestive System with Max Axiom, Super ScientistA Journey through the Digestive System with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science) and The Surprising World of Bacteria with Max Axiom, Super ScientistThe Surprising World of Bacteria with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science)
  21. A book that you would consider a guilty pleasureWinter by Marissa Meyer. Love love love that series.
  22. A book published before 1850The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas would both work.
  23. A book published this year – lots to choose from here, including My Kitchen Year by Ruth Reichl.
  24. A self-improvement bookBetter Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

24 of 24, thanks to me counting children’s books when necessary and taking an award finalist instead of winner. Eh, close enough for me. 😉

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2015 Reading Challenges Update

The year is about half over, so it seems like a good time to check in on how I’m doing at my reading challenge. The only one I “officially” planned on doing is Modern Mrs. Darcy’s, but I also decided to just take a look at Book Riot’s challenge and see how many I’ve already met, and if I want to try and get them all done before the end of the year.

Modern Mrs Darcy’s 2015 Reading Challenge

MMD 2015 Reading Challenge June Progress

And in case you want links for them:

  1. a book you’ve been meaning to read
  2. a book published this yearThe Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows
  3. a book in a genre you don’t typically readEnder’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  4. a book from your childhoodThe Princess BrideThe Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman
  5. a book your mom loves
    [planning on counting my re-read for bookclub of 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
  6. a book that was originally written in a different languageHeidi by Johanna Spyri
  7. a book “everyone” has read but you –
    [planning on counting Seabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand when I finish it. I missed book club but I am still going to finish the book]
  8. a book you choose because of the coverSeraphina by Rachel Hartman
  9. a book by a favorite authorCold Tangerines by Shauna Niequist
  10. a book recommended by someone with great taste
    [planning on counting Rules of Civility, a book club pick for September]
  11. a book you should have read in high school –
    [planning on counting Pride & Prejudice, once I finish it.]
  12. a book currently on the bestseller listAs You Wish by Cary Elwes

That puts me at 7/12, so I’m on track to get these done for the year. Especially since three of the remaining categories I’m filling with book club books, and I know I’ll get those read.


Book Riot’s 2015 Read Harder Challenge

  1. A book written by someone when they were under the age of 25My Father’s DragonMy Father's Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett by Ruth Stiles Gannett (who was 25 when this was published, so I’m assuming it was written when she was under 25.)
  2. A book written by someone when they were over the age of 65National Geographic Kids Animal Stories coauthored by Jane Yolen
  3. A collection of short storiesThe Thirteen Problem by Agatha Christie
  4. A book published by an indie press
    [I need to scan my TBR pile – surely something already on there is from an indie press.]
  5. A book by someone that identifies as LGBTQ –
    [planning to read Every DayEvery Day by David Levithan by David Levithan]
  6. A book by a person whose gender is different from your ownI Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley
  7. A book that takes place in Asia – Let me just get credit for two of them: the nonfiction The Lady and the Panda, which mostly takes place in China, and the YA title Listen Slowly, which is set in Vietnam.
  8. A book by an author from Africa –
    [I’ve had a couple of memoirs set in Africa on my TBR list for ages – time to get one of them read.]
  9. A book that is by or about someone from an indigenous culture (Native Americans, Aboriginals, etc.) –
    [I’ve had both Follow the Rabbit-Proof FenceFollow the Rabbit-Proof Fence by Doris Pilkington/Nugi Garimara and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time IndianThe Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie languishing on my TBR list and this may be the push to finally read one or both of them.]
  10. A microhistoryGhost Map by Steven Johnson (maybe stretching the definition of microhistory here)
  11. A YA novel – so many to choose from here. Most recently finished If I StayIf I Stay by Gayle Forman and Where She WentWhere She Went by Gayle Forman by Gayle Forman
  12. A sci-fi novelEnder’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  13. A romance novelEnchanted, Inc.Enchanted, Inc. (Katie Chandler, Book 1) by Shanna Swendson
  14. A NBA, MBP or Pulitzer Prize winner
    [I’ve been meaning to read Bring Up the Bodies (which won the Booker), or if I’d finish Brown Girl Dreaming that won the National Book Award
  15. A book that is a retelling of a classic storyBook of a Thousand Days
  16. An audiobookAs You Wish. Although I didn’t listen to it 100%.
  17. A collection of poetry – if kids’ poetry counts, I’ve read Eric Carle’s Animals AnimalsEric Carle's Animals Animals
  18. A book that someone else has recommended to youThe Best Yes: Making Wise Decisions in the Midst of Endless DemandsThe Best Yes: Making Wise Decisions in the Midst of Endless Demands by Lysa TerKeurst by Lysa TerKeurst
  19. A book that was originally published in another languageThe Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up
  20. A graphic novel or a graphic memoir – Does a kids’ graphic novel count? I read A Journey through the Digestive System with Max Axiom, Super ScientistA Journey through the Digestive System with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science) and The Surprising World of Bacteria with Max Axiom, Super ScientistThe Surprising World of Bacteria with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science)
  21. A book that you would consider a guilty pleasure –
    [once Marissa Meyer’s WinterWinter (The Lunar Chronicles) by Marissa Meyer is published I’ll be reading it. If I’d enjoyed Fairest more I’d go ahead and count it here.]
  22. A book published before 1850 –
    [If I would ever finish Pride & Prejudice it’ll count here
  23. A book published this year – so many to choose from here, so I’ll go with The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley this time.
  24. A self-improvement bookBetter Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

That puts me at 17/24, and I’ve got 2 others that are almost finished. I think I can get this completed this year too!

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Update on Books I Was Looking Forward to Reading in 2014

Way back in January I shared a list of titles that I was looking forward to reading during the year. Let’s look back at that and laugh at how few of them I actually read. On the plus side, some of the ones I did read I enjoyed, so at least there’s that.

Only one fiction title

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: CressCressLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: Cress (The Lunar Chronicles) by Marissa Meyer by Marissa Meyer

Original thoughts: Loved the previous books in the series, so of course I wanted to read this one.

The verdict: Read it. Loved it. Impatiently waiting for the next ones in the series.

Books from Bloggers

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: Notes from a Blue BikeNotes from a Blue Bike: The Art of Living Intentionally in a Chaotic WorldLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: Notes from a Blue Bike: The Art of Living Intentionally in a Chaotic World by Tsh Oxenreider by Tsh Oxenreider

Original thoughts: I loved her earlier book One Bite at a TimeOne Bite at a Time: 52 Projects for Making Life Simpler by Tsh Oxenreider, read her blog, and like the premise of the book. Why wouldn’t I like this one?

The verdict: It was ok, but if you’ve read her blog much at all not much of it is new. Overall I was kind of disappointed in it.

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: Girl at the End of the WorldGirl at the End of the World: My Escape from Fundamentalism in Search of Faith with a FutureLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: Girl at the End of the World: My Escape from Fundamentalism in Search of Faith with a Future by Elizabeth Esther by Elizabeth Esther

Original thoughts: Her blog, is thought-provoking if a bit hard to read at times (I get occasional flashbacks to my upbringing, in not-a-good-way).

The verdict: Haven’t read it. The library recently added it to their collection, so I should be able to give it a try soon. Whether or not I’ll finish it is up in the air.

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: Something Other Than GodSomething Other Than God: How I Passionately Sought Happiness and Accidentally Found ItLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: Something Other Than God: How I Passionately Sought Happiness and Accidentally Found It by Jennifer Fulwiler by Jennifer Fulwiler

Original thoughts: Love love love her blog, and have been reading it for years. Plus, conversion stories fascinate me.

The verdict: Two thumbs up!

History is Awesome

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: A History of the World in Twelve MapsA History of the World in 12 MapsLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: A History of the World in 12 Maps by Jerri Brotton by Jerry Brotton

Original thoughts: My library career included a stint cataloging maps, and I love history, so combining the two sounded heavenly.

The verdict: Borrowed in on the kindle and it was not a good pick in that version. Then I had a baby and my virtually all my reading had to be done via the kindle. So this title has to wait.

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: One Summer America, 1927One Summer: America, 1927Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: One Summer: America, 1927 by Bill Bryson by Bill Bryson
Original thoughts: Love his books A Walk in the Woods and In a Sunburned Country, and this sounded like just my sort of history book.

The verdict: Borrowed it from the library, but then had a baby and couldn’t focus on it like it needed. Most of my reading post-baby has been of the lighter variety. Hope to get this one again in 2015.

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: The Bully PulpitThe Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of JournalismLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism by Doris Kearns Goodwin by Doris Kearns Goodwin
Original thoughts: She’s written another favorite title of mine, so I expected to love her latest.

The verdict: Didn’t even try it. Once again I’ll just blame the baby – this is a big work of nonfiction and will need more brain power than I had last year to give it. I’m not even sure I’ll get to it in 2015.

People are Fascinating

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: The Heir ApparentThe Heir Apparent: A Life of Edward VII, the Playboy PrinceLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: The Heir Apparent: A Life of Edward VII, the Playboy Prince by Jane Ridley by Jane Ridley

Original thoughts: Sounded interesting, about a historical figure all but unknown to me.

The verdict: Borrowed it, and returned it unread. I’m such a mood reader, and I never felt in the mood to even try this one. Apparently I’m not as interested in Edward VII as I thought back in January.

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: Elizabeth of YorkElizabeth of York: A Tudor Queen and Her WorldLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: Elizabeth of York: A Tudor Queen and Her World by Alison Weir by Alison Weir

Original thoughts: I do love Weir’s books, and Tudor history.

The verdict: Borrowed it, didn’t read it. See above regarding brain power and it being lacking.

No, really, I think this sounds fantastic

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: The King of SportsThe King of Sports: Football’s Impact on AmericaLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: The King of Sports: Football's Impact on America by Gregg Easterbrook by Gregg Easterbrook

Original thoughts: I am a former (pre-children) devoted NFL fan and used to read Easterbrook’s Tuesday Morning Quarterback column every week.

The verdict: Borrowed it, and read the first quarter. Then I had a baby and had to return the book before I finished it, and haven’t borrowed it again. I’m not sure I want to honestly – it’s so depressing about the negatives regarding the football industry that it’s hard to read.

Faith

Looking Forward to Reading in 2014: Encounters with JesusEncounters with Jesus: Unexpected Answers to Life’s Biggest QuestionsLooking Forward to Reading in 2014: Encounters with Jesus: Unexpected Answers to Life's Biggest Questions by Timothy Keller by Timothy Keller

Original thoughts: Keller’s books are fantastic. This one probably is too, right?

The verdict: It was good, but not as great as I expected. This is perhaps just a reflection of my very high expectations for his books.

And, a bonus one, because it doesn’t even have a title yet (as far as I know), but apparently Rachel Held Evans has another book coming out next Fall. I find her books very thought-provoking, and whenever it releases, I’ll be anxious to read it.

The verdict: This one got pushed back to a 2015 release, so now I have it to look forward to next year!

So let’s see, out of 11 titles available in 2014, I read (as in completed) 4 of them. I read at least a chapter of 3 others, and read nothing at all of the final 4. That is really unimpressive, but probably what I get for being somewhat ambitious with my nonfiction selections in a year when I was having a baby.

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An Update on the Quarterly Classic Reading Challenge

2014 Reading Challenge The Quarterly ClassicI promised an update on this, and I’ve been putting off writing it. I *hate* not meeting my goals, even if no one else cares if I do or don’t.

So, last year I planned a reading challenge. Four classic novels, one per quarter. Easy, right? Except shortly after brainstorming and making the goal for the challenge, I discovered I was pregnant with baby #3.

Right there, I should have deferred the challenge for a year. Two previous pregnancies have been … challenging, and even if I avoided the severe nausea and vomiting of the past, two other kiddos don’t always make life easy. I’m also considered high-risk, due to some ongoing health conditions and other issues, so that meant extra appointments and schedule juggling.

Except, I’d already made plans! Not just mental ones that only I knew about – real ones, with my friend Amy. Surely I could still manage to read those four books.

You know where this is going, don’t you?

I’m still reading, yes. But reading with pregnancy brain and in between everything else is quite different than reading when I’m at full strength if you will. I’ve had to dial back on the books that require focus and close attention. Spiritual reading, book club picks, and titles related to homeschooling are getting that time, not leaving a lot of time for classic literature.

I could have finished the books I planned to by now, but it would have been by racing through them, or not focusing on them enough to appreciate the language. And I don’t want to have just “read” them where my eyes have passed over all the text on the page. I want to immerse myself in them more. I want to savor all of Pride and PrejudiceThe Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded Edition by Jane Austen – it’ll be the only first time I ever read it after all.

So, yes, I’m calling it quits on my reading challenge. I apologize to anyone who was joining in. While I’d love to say “come back in 2015 when I’ll try again!,” instead I think I’ll see how things are going with three, and then evaluate what I think I can handle. I’ve already made plans for one blogging project for the year, and I’m trying to not make the same mistake again and jump in without really thinking it through.

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2014 Reading Goals: May Progress

2014 Reading Goals

  1. Participate in my 2014 Reading Challenge.
    Ha. hahahahaha. Will share later about my revised reading challenge, because this one isn’t happening.
  2. Read 208 books.
    Still technically on track with this one, but it’s not going to last much longer. The baby’s arrival is going to doom this goal.
  3. Read 40,000 pages.
    See previous goal, because the same thing applies.
  4. Read all book club selections.
    Still on track with this one, and I’m feeling hopeful that I’ll manage to reach this one, no modifications needed!
  5. Get new children’s books monthly to share with the kids.
    Undoubtedly my most successful goal.
  6. Listen to 1 audio book.
    Audio books and I are not mixing right now. No progress made with this goal.
  7. Read through the entire Bible in a new edition Modified goal: Read the New Testament in a new edition.
    I conceded that this one wasn’t happening. Too many mornings with too much sickness and a fuzzy brain put me so far behind, and I don’t really want to race through the reading just to reach the goal. I’d rather modify it and try to get something out of what I’m reading.
  8. Promptly share books that I’ve finished via my Pinterest board.
    As long as “promptly” means some time in the month, I’m still covered. 😉
  9. Clear 24 more books off of my TBR stack at home.
    I read four this month, so I’m ahead of schedule. Yay!
  10. A subgoal of number 9: 12 of those 24 books need to be from my Christianity stacks.
    All 4 were, so I’m ahead of schedule here too. Whew. 🙂

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Where I Confess My Failings

The Annotated Pride and PrejudiceI had promised a post for last Wednesday about the Quarterly Reading Challenge, which featured Pride and PrejudicePride and Prejudice this month.

I avoided the post last week, thinking surely I’d have finished the book and gotten a post together by this week.

Instead, I’m writing this on Sunday evening and am acknowledging that there is no way I’ll both read the rest of the book and write a coherent post about it before Wednesday morning.

So rather than speed-read or cram it all by forfeiting sleep (my usual technique in high school), I’ll just beg forgiveness from anyone anxiously awaiting the post (that’s a joke; I don’t think anyone is anxiously awaiting it), and share a real post later, once I’ve completed the book. 🙂

Until then, you can read Amy’s post about Pride and Prejudice; she hasn’t finished it either although she’s further along than I am.

(Note to anyone interested in reading along: you can grab a free Kindle copy of Pride and Prejudice right herePride and Prejudice.)

(Note to self: start A Tale of Two CitiesA Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens earlier in the quarter. As in, right after I finish Austen.)

2014 Reading Challenge The Quarterly Classic

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2013 Reading Challenge Wrap-Up

2013 Reading Challenge Wrap-Up I began December needing to only read two more books that had been on my own bookcases since at least 2012 to meet the goal I set last year, and I had two books that had been in progress all year that qualified. In other words, this was an easy month.

I finished The Message of the Old Testament: Promises MadeThe Message of the Old Testament: Promises Made by Mark Dever (all 960 pages of it) and am very glad that I read it. It was not light reading, and spreading it out over the year helped me get the most out of it. As it was, I read each chapter when I got to that book in my Bible reading schedule as each chapter discussed one book in the Old Testament.

I also finished reading the Bible, and I’m counting that for this challenge because I read an edition that I’d had on my bookcase for several years. The Archaeological Study BibleNIV Archaeological Study Bible: An Illustrated Walk Through Biblical History and Culture was fabulous – I loved the historical details and background information, and will be keeping it on my shelf for reference.

Curious about all the books I’ve read for the challenge? You can see them on my “2013 Reading Challenge” shelf in my Goodreads account. (You do have to be a member of Goodreads to see the shelf.) And if you’re not a member of Goodreads, here’s a list of all the books I finished this year for the challenge:

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Introducing the 2014 Reading Challenge

2014 Reading Challenge The Quarterly ClassicLast year’s Reading Challenge was completely focused on clearing out some of the books that had been lingering unread on my bookshelves for ages and ages. This year, I’m including that concept as one of my reading goals, but I’ve set a different challenge for myself.

While I love the idea of a bigger classics challenge like Jessica did last year, realistically that seemed more ambitious than is wise. Instead, Amy of the Crunchy Librarian and I are doing a quarterly reading challenge.

January – March: Pride and PrejudicePride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
April – June: A Tale of Two CitiesA Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
July – September: Wuthering HeightsWuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
October – December: A Prayer for Owen MeanyA Prayer for Owen Meany: A Novel by John Irving

Tentative plans are to post about the books mid/late in the last month of the quarter. So look for a post about Pride and Prejudice somewhere towards the end of March – I’ll be sure and share exactly when that post will be published in advance via The Deliberate Reader’s Facebook page, and Twitter. I’m also considering sharing on social media when I start the books, and what I’m thinking of them as I’m reading (kind of a real-time review, or what I’d tell you if I bumped into you in person and you asked about what I was currently reading.)

If you’d like to join us as we read and blog about these books, we’d love to have you come along and share your thoughts.

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Reading Challenge Progress: December

2013 Reading Challenge Progress The last week in November I realized I hadn’t finished *any* books for this challenge, so I made a big push over the Thanksgiving weekend and got three finished. Ok, so two of them I’d already started and was halfway and a third of the way through them, so that’s not quite as amazing as it might sound.

The one I was halfway through and had stalled on finishing was All You Need to Believe: The Apostles’ CreedAll You Need to Believe: The Apostles' Creed (Foundations of the Faith) by C. Donald Cole by C. Donald Cole. I’ve had it for several years, although I don’t remember exactly how it ended up on my bookshelf. It was fine – some of the theological specifics weren’t ones I fully understood (or at least that I cared enough to try to fully understand), but I’m still glad I read it.

I also read Beyond Bath Time: Embracing Motherhood as a Sacred RoleBeyond Bath Time: Embracing Motherhood as a Sacred Role by Erin Davis by Erin Davis. It’s one I mentioned in last month’s Twitterature linkup – it was sent to me to review ages and ages ago, and then I misplaced the book and forgot all about it. We cleaned out our truck this fall and I discovered the book wedged under the front seat and felt awful about having forgotten it and never reviewing it. So now it’s finished and I can finally write that long overdue review. Except the blog that I had when I agreed to review it is long defunct, so it’s going here instead. Hope they don’t mind.

And finally, while it took me many fits and starts I managed to finish The Code of Love: An Astonishing True Tale of Secrets, Love, and WarThe Code of Love: An Astonishing True Tale of Secrets, Love, and War by Andro Linklater by Andro Linklater. I think I read the intro to it a half dozen times because I kept putting it aside and then coming back to it weeks later. I’ll be posting a review of it at some point.

With one month left in the challenge, I’ve read 22 books. My goals was 24, so I’m back on track with only two more to finish. I should reach that easily since I’ve got two long ones that I’m all but finished, so as long as I stay on pace with those I’ll meet my goal for the year!

If you’re blogging about your progress, feel free to add your post link below – it’ll stay open all month. Or you can leave a comment on the post.

Link Up Guidelines:

  1. The link-up will stay up all month. The next link up will be December 31.
  2. Link the unique URL of your post, not your blog's home page. Readers may view link ups months after the fact and you want to make it easy for them to find the relevant post.
  3. Please include the 2013 Reading Challenge Button (unedited) or mention you're linking up to the 2013 Reading Challenge at The Deliberate Reader.
  4. Share your post and read and comment on those who link up.

Curious about what books I've read for the challenge? You can see them on my "2013 Reading Challenge" shelf in my Goodreads account. (You do have to be a member of Goodreads to see the shelf.)

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