Favorite Kids’ Books of 2014

Favorite Kids' Books of 2014

Picture Books

AlmostAlmostAlmost by Richard Torrey by Richard Torrey

Probably my daughter’s favorite picture book for the year – I think she related to the younger sibling aspect, even though the main character is closer in age to my son instead of her. She liked to “read” it to me, by reciting the text since she knew it all by memory.

Randy Riley's Really Big HitRandy Riley’s Really Big HitRandy Riley's Really Big Hit by Chris Van Dusen by Chris Van Dusen

Perhaps my son’s favorite picture book of the year. The illustrations, the topic, and the inclusion of a telescope and giant robot all combined to be a BIG HIT. Pun very much intended.

The Great DivideThe Great Divide: A Mathematical MarathonThe Great Divide: A Mathematical Marathon by Dayle Ann Dodds, illustrated by Tracy Mitchell by Dayle Ann Dodds, illustrated by Tracy Mitchell

Who knew division could be so entertaining? Not that the kids realize what’s going on in the book; they just think it’s fun.

Full HouseFull House: An Invitation to FractionsFull House: An Invitation to Fractions by Dayle Ann Dodds, illustrated by Abby Carter by Dayle Ann Dodds, illustrated by Abby Carter

Another math picture book, another one beloved by my daughter. Both kids really enjoy Dodds work – no idea if it’s making any impact on them from a mathematical standpoint, but the books are fun regardless.

JourneyJourneyJourney by Aaron Becker by Aaron Becker

A wonderful wordless picture book, with a storyline that reminded me just a bit of Harold and the Purple CrayonHarold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson, although the illustration style is completely different.

Tweak TweakTweak TweakTweak Tweak by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier

My daughter adored this one, and asked for it again and again and again. She also tried to reenact it, which was awfully cute.

Have You Seen My New Blue SocksHave You Seen My New Blue Socks?Have You Seen My New Blue Socks? by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier
My daughter especially enjoyed this one. It’s a very quick, very cute read, with lots of simple rhymes that encouraged my kids to guess the sentence ending. It was an ideal library book – we read it endlessly for about 6 weeks, and then happily sent it back for fresh material.

Musk Ox CountsMusk Ox CountsMusk Ox Counts by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers

Funny story line, cute illustrations – my kids think it’s hilarious, even though they’re too young to get all the jokes. Maybe they just like the illustrations that much? I don’t like it as much as A Is for Musk OxA Is for Musk Ox by Erin Cabatingan, illustrated by Matthew Myers, but it’s still a cute counting book.

Nonfiction Picture Books

I Can Name 50 Trees TodayI Can Name 50 Trees Today!I Can Name 50 Trees Today!: All About Trees (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library) by Bonnie Worth, illustrated by Aristides Ruiz and Joe Mathieu by Bonnie Worth, illustrated by Aristides Ruiz and Joe Mathieu

The Cat in the Hat nonfiction titles were new to us this year, and we read several of them. This was the most popular, but they also really liked the Why Oh Why Are Deserts Dry?Why Oh Why Are Deserts Dry?: All About Deserts (Cat in the Hat's Learning Library) one.

Berenstain Bear's Big Book of Science and NatureThe Berenstain Bears’ Big Book of Science and NatureThe Berenstain Bears' Big Book of Science and Nature by Stan & Jan Berenstain by Stan & Jan Berenstain

I’ve lost track of how many times we read this one, but it might have been the most frequently read title of the year.

Is a Blue Whale the Biggest Thing There Is?Is a Blue Whale the Biggest Thing There Is? (Wells of Knowledge Science) by Robert E. Wells by Robert E. Wells

My son adores the Wells science series, and this is probably his favorite. Blue whales and outer space and so much fun!

What's Under the SeaWhat’s Under the SeaWhat's Under the Sea (Starting Point Science)

My son seems to love all the Usborne books we ever read, and this was no exception. We read it quickly, and then reread it and reread it.

Things People DoThings People DoThings People Do by Anne Civardi, illustrated by Stephen Cartwright by Anne Civardi, illustrated by Stephen Cartwright

This was initially a good-but-not-great book for my son, and then he hit the halfway point of it and became obsessed with it, looking at it by himself whenever he could.

Chapter Books

The Boxcar ChildrenThe Boxcar ChildrenThe Boxcar Children (The Boxcar Children, No. 1) (Boxcar Children Mysteries) by Gertrude Chandler Warner by Gertrude Chandler Warner

The book that turned my son into a chapter book reader – this is the first book we (successfully) read that wasn’t illustrated on every page, with a plot that continued on through successive chapters. We read it multiple times as well, with both kids asking repeatedly for the story about the “four hungry kids.”

Bink & GollieBink and GollieBink and Gollie by Kate DiCamillo and Alison McGhee, illustrated by Tony Fucile by Kate DiCamillo and Alison McGhee, illustrated by Tony Fucile

An excellent bridge from picture books to chapter books – each chapter stands alone, it’s got illustrations on every page, and the plot is easy to follow.

Mercy Watson to the RescueMercy Watson to the RescueMercy Watson to the Rescue by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen

Another excellent bridge from picture to chapter books. My 3 1/2 year old daughter especially loved this one – she found the story line to be really funny.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

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Comments

  1. I thought Journey was such a gorgeous book! A feast for the eyes!

    • It really is – have you seen his other book Quest? I keep forgetting to look for it, but one of these days I’ll remember to see if the library has it. It looks like it’ll be more of the same, which would be fantastic!

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  1. […] the author of Journey (mentioned on the blog previously), and if you liked that one you’ll want to read Quest as well – it’s more of the […]

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