The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

The Murder of Roger AckroydThe Murder of Roger AckroydThe Murder of Roger Ackroyd: A Hercule Poirot Mystery (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) by Agatha Christie by Agatha Christie

I’ve become a real fan of Christie’s books, and of Hercule Poirot in particular. This book just reinforced those opinions – I loved it!

It’s easy to understand why this book made the impact it did upon publication, both in the mystery genre and for her reputation. It’s also easy for me to see why she claimed it as one of her favorites of all of her many books.

There are clues galore, but which ones are significant and which mere distractions? There are plenty of suspects, including the mysterious stranger. There’s a suspect who has disappeared – is that evidence of his guilt? There’s even the precursor to Miss Marple!

Hastings isn’t in this book, but he’s mentioned from time to time, and I enjoyed the contrasting narration style between him and Dr. Sheppard.

Generally with mysteries I don’t try to figure out whodunnit, and instead just try and enjoy how the story unfolds. With Christie, I do find myself trying to figure it out, and I get a lot of pleasure when I manage it. No spoilers here, don’t fear, but it’s definitely possible to deduce the murderer before it’s revealed. I won’t say when exactly I managed it as that would skirt a little too close to some spoilers, and this is not a book to have the ending revealed to you before you even begin.

Lots of fun, and definitely worth reading if you haven’t already!

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Considered to be one of Agatha Christie’s most controversial mysteries, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd breaks all the rules of traditional mystery writing.

The peaceful English village of King’s Abbot is stunned. First, the attractive widows Ferrars dies from an overdose of veronal. Not twenty-four house later, Roger Ackroyd—the man she had planned to marry—is murdered. It is a baffling, complex case involving blackmail, suicide, and violent death, a cast that taxes Hercule Poirot’s “little grey cells” before he reaches one of the most startling conclusions of his fabled career.

Book Details

Title: The Murder of Roger AckroydThe Murder of Roger Ackroyd: A Hercule Poirot Mystery (Hercule Poirot Mysteries) by Agatha Christie
Author: Agatha Christie
Category: Fiction / Mystery
My Rating: 4 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Comments

  1. This was the first Agatha Christie book I ever read, and it’s still one of my favorites. I love how it plays off the automatic assumptions we have as mystery readers, especially concerning who can and can’t be a suspect.

  2. I actually haven’t heard of this Christie novel before, and it sounds great!

  3. I love this book! I don’t usually try to figure out mysteries as I read them either, so when I do, I usually think it’s a sign that the mystery isn’t too mysterious!

    • That has always been my approach and reasoning, but I like trying to figure it out in Christie’s books. Why? I don’t know.

  4. I really enjoyed this one too. I read it a little while ago as a part of my Agatha Christie Challenge (https://fennell-books.squarespace.com/the-great-agatha-christie-challenge/) where I am reading all her books in order.

    It isn’t my favourite, but it is in the top 10!

  5. Congratulations! You won the prize package for Sonlight’s January blog party! I emailed you this morning. Let me know your mailing address and I’ll get your prize out to you!

    • Thank you so much! How exciting – I’m not going to go back and look at the prize package, so it’ll just be a fun surprise for me when it arrives. 🙂

  6. This is my favorite Christie mystery! Just seeing the title of your post brought a smile to my face! Thank you!

  7. I love the first line of this post!! (The book is pretty good, too.) 🙂

  8. I realized very near the beginning who did it, but I think I’ve read this one before. That, or one (from Christie or someone else) with the same premise. But Christie is so good that I still spent the whole book going, wait, am I right? Am I sure? Maybe this isn’t the same book and it’s someone else. It didn’t really seem familiar other than the final solution, so I’m still not sure if I’d read it before or not!

    I need to go back and read more Christie. She’s so fun. Did you ever read The Grand Tour? It’s a collection of her letters and photographs written during a trip she took around the world with her husband. Very interesting, but I can’t remember if you’re the one who recommended it or not.

    • That’s how I felt with the Murder on the Orient Express – had I already read it, or something else with the same premise? Because I figured it out way too easily, with more of an “oh yeah, this is the book where xyz happens” not a “ah ha! I’ve got it” reaction.

      I did read The Grand Tour – it’s what helped start me on this Christie kick. I wrote about it in my last 31 Days series – don’t know if you saw it then or not.

      • Exactly, no “ah ha!” moment. But it didn’t feel familiar, either.

        Yes! That’s where I got the recommendation from. OK, good. 🙂

  9. I’d started (but never finished) only one of Agatha Christie’s books but watched all the Poirot episodes on Netflix. I unexpectedly picked up a copy of Duchess of Death: an authorized biography of Agatha Christie and I was surprised I liked it. So I gave one of her books another chance and read Death on the Nile in 2 days.
    I feel like we know so many of these plots is because various authors and tv shows have copied them and so this generation isn’t nearly as surprised and Christie is a victim of her own successful. ;o)

    • I think you’re exactly right – she’s been copied so many times that she now seems unoriginal.

      And I don’t know why I didn’t even think about watching some Poirot on Netflix. Hmmm, next time I’m wanting to watch something I may have to do that. Thanks for the idea!

Trackbacks

  1. […] The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie (my review) […]

Leave a Comment

*