Reading The Hobbit for the First Time (Don’t Be Like Me)

At the end of last year, my Facebook book club read The Hobbit. I’d been looking forward to it for years, but was underwhelmed by it. If you too want to avoid overall disappointment when reading The Hobbit, I have some suggestions.

Read it when you’re younger

It’s a much simpler book than The Lord of the Rings and expecting that layering of depth in The Hobbit led me to wonder where the rest of it was. It’s much more straightforward and felt lacking. If I’d read it as a teen or even tween, I don’t think I’d have noticed anything.

Don’t listen to it the first time

There are some songs scattered throughout the text, and listening to the book makes it hard to skip over them. I wanted to skip over them, as they were tedious and seemed to take for.ev.er. to get through. I’m also much faster at reading than listening, so the book seemed endless for what all it didn’t cover, and if I’d been reading it I could have zipped along.

Read it before The Lord of the Rings

Knowing what happens afterward leads to a lot more of a “who cares” feeling throughout this book. Read it first so you don’t know who the characters are, and don’t have any inkling of things that might be important later.

Have the movie ready to watch afterward

Reward yourself for it.

Don’t overhype it to yourself

Too much build-up can lead to ultimate disappointment. That was probably my major problem with the book. 😉

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on the Stack in May 2017

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Nonfiction

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Book club’s pick for June

Word by Word by Kory Stamper

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It sounded interesting (and I’m halfway through and it is)

The Commonsense Kitchen by Tom Hudgens

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Overdrive suggested it to me so I tried it.

Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Seemed like it might be helpful

Fiction

The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

How did I get it: Purchased it from Audible
Why did I get it: Love love love this series.

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I held off on reading the last one in the Cormoran Strike series as long as possible, but then wanted it for vacation.

The Dry by Jane Harper

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It was popping up a lot in various spots online, and the Australia setting was appealing.

Savage Run by C. J. Box

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it:

An Unmarked Grave by Charles Todd

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next one in the Bess Crawford series

A Cold Treachery by Charles Todd

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next book in the Ian Rutledge series

The Unquiet Dead by Ausma Zehanat Khan

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: A later title in the series was recommended, but I wanted to start with the first

Gallows View by Peter Robinson

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it:

Texts from Jane Eyre by Mallory Ortberg

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Satisfying my current Jane Eyre obsession

Himself by Jess Kidd

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how it ended up on my TBR

Jane Steele

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: For my book club

True Grit

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: My Facebook book club’s pick for July. I need to get moving on it.

Death of a Dyer by Eleanor Kuhns

How did I get it: Borrowed the audio version electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I read the first book in the series and enjoyed it well enough to be interested in trying the next one.

Excalibur Rising by Eileen Enwright Hodgetts

How did I get it: Got it for free on Kindle
Why did I get it: Figured it was worth trying

In This Grave Hour by Jacqueline Winspear

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Lastest in the Maisie Dobbs series

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: July’s selection for my in-person book club


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or Instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

May 2017 Recap

May was an amazing reading month – I read so much, and most of the books I finished were ones I really enjoyed.

I didn’t get a lot done in the way of blogging – I was hoping to get posts written ahead before we left on vacation, but it didn’t happen. Then I intentionally left my computer at home and conceded that the blog was going to be put on a brief hiatus. 😉

May 2017 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 24
Books Read This Year: 76

Things That Happened
  • Book club – My Antonia for my in-person book club and Hannah Coulter in the Facebook group.
  • We went on vacation to Florida! We went to Legoland, Disney, and Animal Kingdom. We also had days spent at the pool in between the amusement parks.
  • We wrapped up the “official” school year, although we’ll be doing some light things for the summer.
What’s Cooking

    Lots of quick-and-easy meals, as we’ve been busy with baseball & softball. I keep thinking I should make myself a belated birthday cake, but so far I haven’t bothered. We were in Florida for my actual birthday, which is why it hasn’t happened yet.

    But! The smartest thing I did was schedule a Home Chef box to arrive right after vacation. We got home late Monday afternoon, and Tuesday morning a meal box was at my door. IT. WAS. AWESOME. I want to do that every time we’re coming home from vacation, as it made re-entry so much easier.

What I’m Anticipating in June
  • H’s birthday! 🙂
  • Baseball and softball will end. G’s team will have a tournament, so I’m not sure of the exact ending date.
  • Taekwondo camp, and VBS.
  • Belt testing. G tries again for his 1st degree recommended black belt, and H goes for brown belt. I am *so* hoping she passes because that’ll move her up into the advanced classes. Why do I care? Because then she’ll be in the same class as G again, which makes my life easier. 🙂
  • Book club – Into Thin Air for my in-person book club and Uprooted in the Facebook group.
Books I Read in May

I shared the list of books I read in a post on Thursday, so I’ll share my favorites of the picture books we read in May:

  • The Gardener by Sarah Stewart

    Beautiful illustrations, and a sweet story

  • The Bear Ate Your Sandwich by Julia Sarcone-Roach

    Really funny, and great illustrations

  • Mother Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins

    Made my girls laugh, especially the pictures of the grumpy bear.

  • The Firehouse Light by Janet Nolan

    H really liked this one, and asked for it several days in a row. Interesting story, and well-done at showing the passage of time. It’s a wordier book, and wouldn’t hold the attention of toddlers.

  • Xander’s Panda Party by Linda Sue Park

    Cute story.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Books I Read in May

Trying something new here, since I’m so behind on regular review posts.

I read a TON in May (thank you vacation!) – here’s a quick look at the books I finished, with some brief thoughts about them.

    Favorite Nonfiction

  1. At Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe by Tsh Oxenreider

    Thought-provoking, and it would make an excellent discussion book.

  2. Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach

    Super fun nonfiction, and I learned quite a bit about space travel and the space program. It’s got some parts that if you’re squeamish or opposed to discussions of bodily fluids etc you won’t appreciate. I found it fascinating, and much of it made me very grateful for gravity.

  3. Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant

    Heart-breaking but encouraging and inspiring. Highly recommended for anyone dealing with a loss; it doesn’t just apply to those who have had a spouse die.

  4. Loving My Actual Life: An Experiment in Relishing What’s Right in Front of Me by Alexandra Kuykendall

    I really like this sort of nonfiction – a year (or in this case, 9 months) focusing on specific things to improve your life. If you’re not a fan of this type of book, I doubt this one would appeal to you, but I enjoyed it. It does have a faith basis to it, so if you’re not Christian you may be put off by some parts of the text.

  5. The Commonsense Kitchen by Tom Hudgens

    Some delicious sounding recipes, although I didn’t like the Kindle formatting, which ended up making things harder to read. I’d like to try a few of them but would need to get a print copy first.

  6. Favorite Fiction

  7. Hannah Coulter by Wendell Berry

    My Facebook book club selection for May, and I LOVED it. Gentle fiction, I savored it, and am looking forward to reading more by Berry eventually.

  8. Uprooted by Naomi Novik

    My Facebook book club selection for June (hooray! I’m ahead again for my reading!) and it was excellent. Highly recommended for fantasy fans. It got a little more brutal towards the end than the first part of the book had led me to expect, so I probably wouldn’t recommend it to precocious readers – I’d say this one should stay as an (older teen) young adult title, unless your younger reader is really not bothered by battle descriptions at all.

  9. A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny

    Love the Gamache series, and this is a fantastic entry. Make sure you’re reading them in order though. Really looking forward to the next one publishing in August!

  10. The Dry by Jane Harper

    The setting is well-done, and made me feel like I was there in Australia, suffering through the drought with them. I liked the main character and was happy to see that it’s the first in a series, with the second book publishing (in the US) in 2018. The ending got a bit ridiculous, but I can forgive that in a debut author.

  11. Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

    Love love love this series and I held off on reading #3 for as long as I could. Now to join everyone else in impatiently waiting for #4 to be published. Robin is one of my favorite characters in literature.

  12. A Cold Treachery by Charles Todd

    Love this series, and I was completely surprised by the ending of this one. It was a good one to read during warm weather, as it does such a good job of depicting a frigid winter I was glad not to be living through a snowstorm while reading about one!

  13. Re-Reads

  14. The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

    Re-read (listen) because they’ve just been released by Audible and I needed to get them.

  15. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

    For book club.

  16. Gallows View by Peter Robinson

    Beginning the series again as it’s been so long since I read it. Listened to the audio version.

  17. Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

    For book club.

  18. A Sudden Fearful Death by Anne Perry

    Working through the series again.

  19. Other Titles

  20. My Antonia by Willa Cather

    It suffered in comparison to Hannah Coulter, otherwise, I think I’d have liked this one a lot more. If it hadn’t been my in-person book club’s May selection, I would have put it aside for several months.

  21. An Unmarked Grave by Charles Todd

    I love this series, but this particular title wasn’t my favorite. There are some plot issues that crop up regularly, and it’s getting tedious. If I read the books with more of a gap between them, I doubt it’d bother me quite so much. I’m still looking forward to the next in the series, so this comparatively low rating is simply because of how much I have enjoyed the other titles.

  22. The Unquiet Dead by Ausma Zehanat Khan

    I wanted to like this one more than I did, but found parts of it really confusing, and the overall resolution was quite unbelievable. I did like how it highlighted a part of world history about which I am shamefully ignorant.

  23. Didn’t Especially Like

  24. A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas

    Disappointing. The plot was poor, the characterizations were absurd, and I found myself rolling my eyes throughout it.

  25. Savage Run by C. J. Box

    Much more brutal than I was expecting, with some gruesome details included unnecessarily.

  26. Simply Clean: The Proven Method for Keeping Your Home Organized, Clean, and Beautiful in Just 10 Minutes a Day by Becky Rapinchuk

    Not my favorite of these sorts of books – Clean Your Space was better – in part because it didn’t give unrealistic promises about keeping your home organized, clean, and beautiful in just 10 minutes a day.

  27. Texts from Jane Eyre by Mallory Ortberg

    Really uneven – some of them made me laugh out loud, others left me scratching my head, and others were just not funny to me at all. And that’s just with the titles where I’d read the inspiration book, and knew all of the characters and plot points referenced in the texts.

  28. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill

    The cover was pretty, but the book didn’t live up to it. I question the historical details included, and the obliviousness of the main character. I finished it just to see how it all resolved, but I regret the wasted reading time.

New on Your Stack (volume 25)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:

And a heads-up! The link-up for May will post on Monday the 5th, not on the 3rd like usual.


The Yellow Envelope coverIn a surprising turn of events, Kate (Opinionated Book Lover) has introduced me to a MEMOIR that sounds appealing. Considering her usual dislike for that genre, I never expected to add one to my TBR list from her posts, but I’ve already added The Yellow Envelope to my library holds list.

I’m also interested in reading Carve the Mark which she read in May, but that one wasn’t as surprising.


The Moon in the Palace coverJill (Days at Home) always features books with the prettiest covers. The one that really caught my eye this month? The Moon in the Palace.


Excalibur Rising coverArwen (The Tech Chef) mentioned Excalibur Rising, which is intriguing – Arthurian sagas always catch my eye. It’s currently free for Kindle, so I grabbed it to give it a try.


I Will Always Write Back coverStacie (Sincerely Stacie) only mentioned four books, but one was already on my TBR list – I Will Always Write Back, one has now been added to my TBR list thanks to her mention – One Good Thing About America, and a third – The Sunshine Sisters, is one I’m eyeing as a potential book club selection.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Introducing June’s Book Club Selection: Uprooted

UprootedUprooted by Naomi Novik

What’s It About?

(Description from Goodreads)

“Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley. We hear them sometimes, from travelers passing through. They talk as though we were doing human sacrifice, and he were a real dragon. Of course that’s not true: he may be a wizard and immortal, but he’s still a man, and our fathers would band together and kill him if he wanted to eat one of us every ten years. He protects us against the Wood, and we’re grateful, but not that grateful.”

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life.

Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her.

But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

Why Was This Title Selected

The year’s fantasy option, chosen because Jessica raved over it. It was also surprisingly difficult to find a stand-alone fantasy novel – so many of the ones I was finding were series reads (or at least trilogies), and I didn’t want to choose one that wouldn’t be complete in one book.

Anything Else to Know About It?

The discussion will begin soon in the Facebook group, and you’re welcome to come and join us.

It’s available in Print, for Kindle or Nook, or via Audible.

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.

What’s Coming Up Next?

true-gritTrue Grit by Charles Portis

What’s it about? Fourteen-year-old Mattie Ross recounts the time when she sought retribution for her father’s murder.

Find the book: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads

And a heads-up: you can get the Audible version for a reduced price if you buy the Kindle version first.

See all the books we’ll be reading in 2017 here.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

April 2017 Recap

I love the idea of Spring more than I actually like Spring itself I think. Not because of dreading summer, or a huge love for winter, but because of what Spring brings with it.

And by that I mean pollen. Allergies have been rough this year and I’ve been doing all of my crunchy natural remedies and using some OTC medicine too, in an attempt to keep myself functional. Even with all that I still feel like I spent a lot of time in a fog.

April 2017 in Stats

Books Read This Month: 20
Books Read This Year: 52

Things That Happened
  • Book club – A Gentleman in Moscow for my in-person book club and Dark Matter in the Facebook group.
  • Baseball began for G, and both kids had their opening day festivities. On the same day, which was aggravating. I ended up missing all of G’s events, and R missed half of H’s game as he was off with G at those events.
  • Belt testing – G went for recommended black belt (black belt with a red stripe down the middle), and H for senior blue belt (which is the last belt that attends the intermediate classes). For the first time ever in his taekwondo career, G did not pass a belt testing. He messed up something on his form (his arm was turned up when it should have been down, or it was down when it should have been up, I don’t remember). He took the disappointment really well, and is ready to retry in June.
  • R’s brother visited for a few days, and the kids were SO EXCITED to see him. Unfortunately, his last day here was the day of the kids baseball/softball opening events, so R didn’t get to see much of him that last day as we were off with the kids.
What’s Cooking

    I have no idea – clearly, we all ate this month, but I don’t remember anything in particular that I fixed. I think it was a month of old standbys and “what is in the fridge that I can pull together” kind of meals.

What I’m Anticipating in May
  • My birthday! 🙂
  • I think we’re going to wrap-up this year of homeschooling for our summer break. It’s possible we may go into June a little bit though; I’m not completely decided on what we’ll do.
  • It’s also possible we won’t have any summer break, and will do school every day we don’t have something else planned (like VBS or Cub Scout camp)
  • Cub Scouts wraps up for the year, which is bittersweet. It’s been a lot of fun for G, and in many ways we have more time in the summer for activities. I’m not one of the leaders though, so it’s easy for me to not feel the same need for a break from everything. 🙂
  • Awana also ends, so G is done with Sparks. That means he’s now been participating in Awana for 5 years, which seems crazy to me.
  • Book club – My Antonia for my in-person book club and Hannah Coulter in the Facebook group.
Books I Read in April
  1. Home Crowd Advantage by Ben Aaronovitch (short story)
  2. Black Coffee by Agatha Christie, adapted by Charles Osborne
  3. A Bitter Truth by Charles Todd
  4. A Fearsome Doubt by Charles Todd
  5. Rivers of London: Body Work by Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel
  6. When to Rob a Bank by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner (audio)
  7. Rivers of London: Night Witch by Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel
  8. Clean My Space by Melissa Maker
  9. The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny
  10. Ely Plot by Joan Lennon
  11. Escape from Wolfhaven Castle by Kate Forsyth
  12. Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer
  13. Bo at Ballard Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill
  14. Other People’s Dirt by Louise Rafkin (audio)
  15. Keeping the Castle by Patrice Kindl
  16. Defend and Betray by Anne Perry
  17. Journey to Munich by Jacqueline Winspeare
  18. Saveur: The New Comfort Food by James Oseland
  19. Have Spacesuit Will Travel by Robert A. Heinlein (audio)
  20. Four Seasons in Rome by Anthony Doerr

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on the Stack in April 2017

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or Instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Nonfiction

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary RoachPacking for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I love Mary Roach.

Clean My Space: The Secret to Cleaning Better, Faster, and Loving Your Home Every Day by Melissa MakerClean My Space: The Secret to Cleaning Better, Faster, and Loving Your Home Every Day by Melissa Maker

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: It kept appearing across my path, and I took it as a sign that I should read it. 😉

At Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe by Tsh OxenreiderAt Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe by Tsh Oxenreider

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m excited to read this new release – I followed her travels while they were happening, and am fascinated by this idea.

Loving My Actual Life: An Experiment in Relishing What's Right in Front of Me coverLoving My Actual Life: An Experiment in Relishing What’s Right in Front of Me by Alexandra Kuykendall

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Fell for the cover, but the premise sounds intriguing.

The New Comfort Food - Home Cooking from Around the World by SaveurSaveur: The New Comfort Food – Home Cooking from Around the World by James Oseland

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Fell for the cover, but I do know and trust Saveur’s recipes.

Other People's DirtOther People’s Dirt by Louise Rafkin

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Looking for a short audio book, and it was one of the first ones available.

Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners by Therese OneillUnmentionable: The Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners by Therese Oneill

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how I discovered this title, but it may be a fun historical read. I’m hoping for a Mary Roach-style look at the topic, but if the tone isn’t right, I may be sending it right back.

Cork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste by Bianca BoskerCork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste by Bianca Bosker

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I love memoirs.

Fiction

Uprooted by Naomi NovikUprooted by Naomi Novik

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s June’s book club title

Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer, illustrated by Douglas HolgateWires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer, illustrated by Douglas Holgate

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: A graphic novel continuing the Cinder series? I must read it!

Rivers of London Body WorkRivers of London: Body Work by Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel, illustrated by Lee Sullivan

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m reading everything I can find in the Peter Grant series. Even graphic novels.

Rivers of London Night WitchRivers of London: Night Witch by Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel, illustrated by Lee Sullivan

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Another graphic novel in the Peter Grant series.

Have Spacesuit Will Travel by Robert A. HeinleinHave Spacesuit Will Travel by Robert A. Heinlein

How did I get it: Borrowed the audio from the library.
Why did I get it: Catherine mentioned it in a recent conversation I had with her and I was curious about it.

Keeping the Castle by Patrice KindlKeeping the Castle by Patrice Kindl

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I don’t remember how it ended up on my TBR list.

A Sudden Fearful Death by Anne PerryA Sudden Fearful Death by Anne Perry

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Next in the William Monk series.

The Sky is Falling by Kit PearsonThe Sky is Falling by Kit Pearson

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: For a project I’m working on. If I ever get it finished you’ll hear all about it. 😉

The Blue Jay by Michelle SchlicherThe Blue Jay by Michelle Schlicher

How did I get it: Freebie from Amazon.
Why did I get it: It sounded interesting enough to download as a freebie.

Amethyst coverAmethyst by Lauren Royal

How did I get it: Freebie from Amazon.
Why did I get it: If on the off chance I’m ever in the mood for this sort of title, now I have one ready to read. A.k.a., it was free, so all I’m spending is a little digital storage space.

May B coverMay B by Caroline Starr Rose

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: I love this book.

Gone Fishing coverGone Fishing by Tamera Will Wissinger, illustrated by Matthew Cordell

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: Adding to my poetry collection for homeschool.

Gone Camping coverGone Camping by Tamera Will Wissinger, illustrated by Matthew Cordell

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: Adding to my poetry collection for homeschool.

Book Scavenger coverBook Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: It was on a major sale, and I couldn’t resist.

Bo at Iditarod CreekBo at Idatirod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Loved Bo at Ballard Creek, and wanted to read more of Bo’s story.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or Instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Cover Love: Dark Matter by Blake Crouch

This new “Cover Love” series is inspired by the “Judging Books by Their Covers” series previously run at Quirky Bookworm.

Please note that this post includes spoilers.

If you haven’t read Dark Matter, I’m not kidding: the book is much better if read it without hearing spoilers. In other words, read the post only after you finish the book. If you still need to read it, find the book here: Print | Kindle | Nook | Audible | Goodreads.

Most cover images are taken from a question posted by Katie, who facilitated the discussion on the book in the Facebook group. I’ve also quoted her commentary on the German and Spanish titles, as I thought it was very insightful.

Dark Matter American hardback cover

The American hardback cover, and the one I was familiar with before searching for additional covers. It’s eye-catching, but before reading the book I didn’t care for it. After finishing the book, I can appreciate the subtle hints it provides to the story.

Dark Matter American paperback cover

The American paperback cover. I feel like this is more distracting than the very similar hardback version, but emphasizes the thriller aspect of the novel.

Dark Matter Australian cover

The Australian version. I get what they’re doing with what looks like red paper cut into strips, but it doesn’t do much for me as a cover, and it wouldn’t make me pick up the book.

Dark Matter German cover

The German cover. “The subtitle is odd, because he’s not a time-traveler, he’s a multiverse traveler. But time travel is Zeitreise, so I guess maybe the plural Zeiten conveys the multiple worlds? And then runner because it’s a race to return to his life/the thriller aspect. Mostly I just love the blurb, because Wahnsinn (craziness) is one of my favorite words in German, and also totally describes this book! Germans and their understatement.”

Dark Matter Spanish cover

The Spanish cover “focuses more on the dark matter of the title (materia obscura = dark matter), with all the little drops of oily black, but it also reminds one of the examples Jason2 uses to explain the multiverse to Daniela, describing each universe as a pond and the fish inside have no idea there are other ponds and a world that holds them.”

Dark Matter Twitter promotional cover

Promotional cover posted to Twitter. Makes complete sense once you know the story, and I’m surprised it was never used in any other way (apparently).

UK paperback cover. I like the maze-like appearance, and that Amanda is there, as she was such a great character. This may be my favorite cover.


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New on Your Stack (volume 24)

Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


A Study in Charlotte by Brittany CavallaroKate (Opinionated Book Lover) planned to read A Study in Charlotte, which is currently on my library holds list. I’ve been a bit obsessed lately with reading Sherlock Holmes-inspired fiction, and lots of buzz surrounding this one meant it was on my “get to this one soon” list. Ok, soon-ish.


Inside the Medieval World by National Geographic coverArwen (The Tech Chef) added tons of children’s books to her bookshelves last month, but what really caught my eye was Inside the Medieval World published by National Geographic. I am fascinated by that time period and am so tempted to get this for myself.


I’m not even sure which book to highlight from Stacie’s post at Sincerely Stacie because she’s got over 30 listed! So I went for the one which I had just checked out the day before – Cork Dork (I am such a sucker for memoirs). But be sure and go to her post and see all the other books she mentions – Beyond Bedlam’s Door sounded really interesting, and I love David Allen, so Ready for Anything is one I want to check out. Her fiction choices included intriguing ones like The Practice House, It’s Always the Husband, The Breakdown, Sugar, Stars Over Clear Lake, and The Roanoke Girls. Whew! Stacie has plot summaries or descriptions for all of these, plus her children’s book finds included in her post.


I’m always tickled when I see people getting books for my book club, and Jill grabbed Funny in Farsi when it was a Kindle special price. It’s no longer at that price but I’m keeping an eye on it for future deals & post them to my Facebook page if I spot them.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!