Cooking the Book: Best 100 Juices for Kids

Best 100 Juices for KidsBest 100 Juices for Kids: Totally Yummy, Awesomely Healthy, & Naturally Sweetened Homemade Alternatives to Soda Pop, Sports Drinks, and Expensive Bottled JuicesBest 100 Juices for Kids: Totally Yummy, Awesomely Healthy, & Naturally Sweetened Homemade Alternatives to Soda Pop, Sports Drinks, and Expensive Bottled Juices by Jessica Fisher by Jessica Fisher

I don’t actually own a juicer. That means many of the recipes included in this cookbook I can’t actually try. But I still found lots to appreciate, enough so that I’m seriously thinking about getting a juicer.

My first tests from the book were the Peaches ‘n’ Cream Yogurt Smoothie, and the Strawberry Colada. I thought they were both delicious, my daughter hated them both, and my son liked the strawberry one, but disliked the peach one. My husband wasn’t home when we tried the peach version, and he wanted his strawberry one with a banana added to it. Once I did that, he loved it.

One of the things I most appreciated about the smoothie chapter is that every smoothie doesn’t include a banana. I hate bananas in smoothies, and it seems like every smoothie recipe I find includes bananas. Sometimes omitting them works, sometimes the smoothie tastes like it’s missing something, and I don’t always want to have to figure out what that is. Apparently one of Fisher’s sons doesn’t like bananas either, so that worked out well for me. 🙂

There are still plenty of ideas for me to try. My kids love slushies (and I hate the versions sold in convenience stores, so a homemade one is fantastic as far as I’m concerned). There are more smoothies that sound delicious. There’s a homemade sports drink, as we enter the season where my husband wants it on hand. But what I want to try next is the Lime-Mint Cooler – in other words, it’s like an alcohol-free mojito. While I look forward to having a mojito again eventually, for now that one will hopefully quench my lime/mint cravings.

I didn’t follow her strawberry colada recipe exactly; I didn’t have canned coconut milk, so I used some coconut extract and coconut water. And as already mentioned, after I removed my share, I added one banana for my husband’s portion.

How I Made “Strawberry Colada”:

2 cups frozen strawberries
1 small can pineapple chunks (from the refrigerator, so they were cold)
1/2 cup water
1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon coconut extract (I didn’t measure it exactly)
honey (added it to taste to get the sweetness where we wanted it)
1/2 cup crushed ice
banana

Blend it all together.

My verdict:

Delicious. I would happily drink this every day.

The kids’ verdict:

My son drank his share and his sister’s, and still wanted more. He’s a fan.

See all the Cooking the Book reviews and recipes I’ve shared..

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Recent Nonfiction Reads: Twitterature-Style

recent nonfiction reads, twitterature-style

The Southern VegetarianThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern TableThe Southern Vegetarian Cookbook: 100 Down-Home Recipes for the Modern Table by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence by Justin Fox Burks & Amy Lawrence

Loved this cookbook – there were tons of recipes that tempted me (unfortunately a few of the ones that were most tempting are maybe a little more work than I’ll want to put into a weeknight dish). A huge bonus to the book is that almost every recipe includes a picture – the only ones I noticed that didn’t were the “basics” in the final chapter – things like pizza dough and a dry rub, etc.

Teach a Child to Read with Children's BooksTeach a Child to Read With Children’s Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading SuccessTeach a Child to Read With Children's Books: Combining Story Reading, Phonics, and Writing to Promote Reading Success by Mark B. Thogmartin by Mark B. Thogmartin

I wish I’d seen the updated version, but overall I found this one to be too much of what I already knew. If you’re new to the educational philosophy behind reading to children and methods of reading instruction, it’s a good resource. I learned to read this way, so the “yes this works!” details weren’t necessary for me, nor the specifics on why a more balanced approach vs. phonics-only or whole-language-only methods is preferable.

All Through the Day, All Through the YearAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and CelebrationsAll Through the Day, All Through the year: Family Prayers and Celebrations by David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutsonby David B. Batchelder, illustrated by Barbara Knutson

Wanted a more general look at celebrating the liturgical calendar, but this was mostly his family’s approach to it. Which … isn’t bad, just not as overall helpful as I wanted. And it might be shallow, but the format of the book was unwieldy and fairly obnoxious to hold and read.

The Internet is a PlaygroundThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online GeniusThe Internet is a Playground: Irreverent Correspondences of an Evil Online Genius by David Thorne by David Thorne
While some of the chapters had me laughing almost hysterically, overall it was unevenly entertaining. I returned it to the library without finishing it, in part because wading through it for the parts I’d find amusing wasn’t worth the reading time.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

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Cooking the Book: Keepers

Keepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the Kitchen by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion | Roasted Chicken Breasts with Potatoes and Farfalle with Gorgonzola and Peas recipes tested by @SheilaRCraigKeepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the KitchenKeepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the Kitchen by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion | Roasted Chicken Breasts with Potatoes and Farfalle with Gorgonzola and Peas recipes tested by @SheilaRCraig by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion

I shared a blurb about this book in my latest Twitterature post, where I also promised that today I’d share more about The Smitten Kitchen CookbookThe Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman by Deb Perelman. So let’s just get that out of the way: I promised it, and it’s not happening. I’ve had plans to try 3 different recipes from the book, and life has gotten in the way from me trying any of them. So I’m conceding, and will try again to write more about that book next month.

Instead I’m subbing in the other cookbook I’ve been using lately, one where I haven’t run into … complications trying the recipes (not the fault of Perelman’s book – the fault of produce freezing in the fridge, and snowstorms keeping me from the store, and when I finally replaced the frozen component, I didn’t repurchase the other items, only to discover that they had gone bad during the delay. Plus an inability to locate beef short ribs. Am I looking in the wrong stores? Looking for the wrong name from how they’re packaged in this area? I will figure it out, but it hasn’t happened yet.)

Anyway, that long intro should not detract from this book. Most of the recipes seem like they’re super easy (appropriate for a weeknight-dinner-themed book), and the two I’ve tried have been winners.

First I tried the Farfalle with Gorgonzola, Ham, and Peas (although I made several modifications) for my lunch one day. I adore pasta, but while my husband likes it, he doesn’t want to eat it as frequently as I do. This is the recipe I’ve featured below, with my modifications listed.

I also tried the Roasted Chicken Breasts and Sweet Potatoes, although I once again changed things slightly and used Yukon Gold potatoes in lieu of the sweet potatoes. As much as I’ve tried to like them, I’ve finally admitted to myself that I just do not like sweet potatoes, so I’ve stopped using them.

My usual chicken purchase is boneless skinless breasts, so as simple as the recipe is, it was still new to me. In many ways, the bone-in, skin-on breasts were even easier to use (no need for me to trim them more), and the hardest part of the dish was chopping the potatoes into uniform cubes.

The verdict? My son ate the chicken and potatoes happily, my daughter refused to try any of it, and my husband didn’t mind it (that counts as a victory in this situation; long story). I liked the chicken a lot, but wasn’t crazy about the slight lemon flavor the potatoes picked up. I’d still happily make it again as it was so easy and provided a lot of leftover chicken I can use for future dishes.

Photographs are provided for both dishes I tried, and many of the other recipes included in the book. I always appreciate that!

Below is how I modified the pasta recipe – cut it in half, changed the pasta shape, used a domestic blue cheese, used extra peas, and omitted the ham.

How I Made “Farfalle with Gorgonzola, Ham, and Peas” and turned it into “Orecchiette with Blue Cheese and Peas”:

1/2 pound orecchiette
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 ounces blue cheese
3/4 cup frozen green peas, thawed
salt and pepper, to taste

Cook the pasta according to package directions.

While the pasta cooks, heat the cream and blue cheese over medium heat in a high-sided pan (you’ll be adding everything to this pan, so you’ll need room to stir it all together). Simmer, stirring often, until the mixture is smooth (took about 4 minutes for me). Stir in the peas and set aside.

When the pasta is ready, drain it and add to the sauce (reserve some of the pasta water in case it’s needed to thin the sauce). Combine pasta and sauce, and taste for seasoning (I added lots of fresh ground black pepper, and a tiny bit of salt, as the cheese is fairly salty already).

My verdict:

An easy pasta dish I can make for myself and still not mind cooking dinner later = winner already. It was super simple to make, although very rich (not surprising with the heavy cream). I halved the recipe, and enjoyed it both the first day, and then reheated for lunch another day. My kids weren’t crazy about it thanks to the blue cheese, but I loved the flavor.

The kids’ verdict:

Dislike. Why are you messing with the beauty that is pasta with butter or pasta with cheese sauce? Especially by putting peas in it??

See all the Cooking the Book reviews and recipes I’ve shared..

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Recent Cookbook Reads, Twitterature-Style

recent reads, twitterature-style
I love reading cookbooks, both for recipe ideas, and because some cookbooks are packed with extra information or stories. These are some of the best cookbooks I’ve finished recently:

The Smitten Kitchen CookbookThe Smitten Kitchen CookbookThe Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman by Deb Perelman
Packed with her usual gorgeous images, with stories accompanying every recipe. I stopped flagging pages where I wanted to try a dish, because there were too many. Come back on the 24th because I have way more to say about this book.

The Book of SchmaltzThe Book of Schmaltz: Love Song to a Forgotten FatThe Book of Schmaltz: Love Song to a Forgotten Fat by Michael Ruhlman by Michael Ruhlman
Yes, it’s a book about fat, but there is some history in it, and beautiful photography, and descriptions of dishes that sound so delicious that I am quite tempted to try and render my own schmaltz to try some of the recipes. If you like Ruhlman (and if you don’t, please don’t tell me), don’t be put off by the topic: it’s fascinating.

The French Market CookbookThe French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian KitchenThe French Market Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from My Parisian Kitchen by Clotilde Dusoulier by Clotilde Dusoulier
Fun to read, but I was surprised not to be that tempted by any of the specific recipes – all of them had some element or another that prevented me from wanting to try them. Lovely photographs still made it one I enjoyed before sending it back to the library.

KeepersKeepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the KitchenKeepers: Two Home Cooks Share Their Tried-and-True Weeknight Recipes and the Secrets to Happiness in the Kitchen by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion
Filled with helpful tips and ideas about getting weeknight dinners on the table – I’ve flagged several I want to try. It reminded me quite a bit of Dinner: A Love Story in its format, without quite as much personal information as DALS included.

Bonne Femme CookbookThe Bonne Femme Cookbook: Simple, Splendid Food That French Women Cook Every DayThe Bonne Femme Cookbook: Simple, Splendid Food That French Women Cook Every Day by Wini Moranville by Wini Moranville
While I love the idea of many of these recipes, and the extra tidbits of information are fun and interesting, I really wish it had more (well, any) pictures – I’m so spoiled by beautifully illustrated cookbooks.

What Katie AteWhat Katie Ate: Recipes and Other Bits and PiecesWhat Katie Ate: Recipes and Other Bits and Pieces by Katie Quinn Davies by Katie Quinn Davies
The best part of this was the peek at what an Irish woman living in Australia eats for her meals. Some of her breakfast dishes were definitely not ones I’ve ever had, although if you’re more well-traveled than me (and that’s not hard to be) they’re probably quite familiar. The format of the book seems to focus on appearance rather than function, and though the photos are pretty, the text is often very hard to read.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!