Cover Love: The Well of Lost Plots

This new “Cover Love” series is inspired by the “Judging Books by Their Covers” series previously run at Quirky Bookworm.

The Well of Lost Plots UK and US covers

Two UK versions, and two US versions. The first two are both UK paperbacks (?), but the third is the US hardcover & Kindle version. The fourth is the US paperback and ebook version.

The Well of Lost Plots French German and Spanish covers

I do love non-English-language covers. They’re so fun.

In order: French, German (Kindle), German (paperback), and Spanish.

Once again I’m having a tough time deciding which is my favorite. I like the car in the library in the first one, I like the text sea in the third, and I like the Jurisfiction badge and dodo in the fourth. The German Kindle version has so many great images behind the witch, but I don’t like how prominent the witch is on that cover. The German paperback includes the plane which is fun.

Find the book: My original review | Print | Kindle | Audible | Goodreads

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The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde

The Well of Lost PlotsThe Well of Lost PlotsThe Well of Lost Plots (Thursday Next Series) by Jasper Fforde by Jasper Fforde

It took me months to finish this book, and usually that’s a sign that it’s one I should have given up on and admitted that I didn’t find it compelling enough to keep reading.

Except I really do like this series – it’s so odd, and so entertaining. So why did it take me forever to finish it? I think it’s because I was reading the collected version of the first five books in the series on my Kindle, and seeing the “11 hours remaining in the book” status was so discouraging I was never motivated to keep reading.

Obviously, I know that those numbers were for the entire set, but still. It couldn’t give me a breakdown of “this far for this book alone” and that drove me batty. Who knew I needed some sort of real guidance as to how much I had left in a book? Because clearly I do, and counting chapters wasn’t enough, at least until the very end.

All that aside, it is a series that I recommend, if you’re into quirky, genre-bending novels. It’s a mish-mash of fantasy and mystery, but it works.

One of my favorite parts of this series is trying to catch as many literary allusions as possible. I have no expectation that I get them all, but I get enough of them to be quite amused and impressed by Fforde.

If it sounds intriguing, do yourself a favor – don’t start with this one – it’ll make no sense whatsoever, and with this series you’ll want all the help you can get as far as making sense of things. Begin with The Eyre AffairThe Eyre Affair: A Thursday Next Novel by Jasper Fforde and see how you like this alternative world, and the fabulous character of Thursday Next.

Publisher’s Description:
The third installment in Jasper Fforde’s New York Times bestselling series follows literary detective Thursday Next on another adventure in her alternate reality of literature-obsessed England

Jasper Fforde has done it again in this genre-bending blend of crime fiction, fantasy, and top-drawer literary entertainment. After two rollicking New York Times bestselling adventures through Western literature, resourceful BookWorld literary detective Thursday Next definitely needs some downtime. And what better place for a respite than in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and quiet remain elusive for Thursday, who soon discovers that the Well is a veritable linguistic free-for-all, where grammasites run rampant, plot devices are hawked on the black market, and lousy books—like the one she has taken up residence in—are scrapped for salvage. To make matters worse, a murderer is stalking the personnel of Jurisfiction and it’s up to Thursday to save the day. A brilliant feat of literary showmanship filled with wit, fantasy, and effervescent originality, this Ffordian tour de force will appeal to fans of Douglas Adams and P. G. Wodehouse.

Book Details

Title: The Well of Lost PlotsThe Well of Lost Plots (Thursday Next Series) by Jasper Fforde
Author: Jasper Fforde
Category: Fiction / Mystery / Fantasy
My Rating: 3 Stars
Buy the book: Print | Kindle | Audible

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Quick Lit for April 2015

Playing catch-up with reviews because as my reading pace picks up post-baby I’m getting backlogged on sharing:

April 2015 Quick Lit
Once Upon an AlphabetOnce Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories for All the LettersOnce Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories for All the Letters by Oliver Jeffers by Oliver Jeffers

I grabbed this for the cover, and thought it was truly a kid’s alphabet book. Yeah, not exactly. Some of the entries for various letters are NOT ones I’d want to read to my kids as they’re surprisingly dark and even creepily morbid at times. I’m not really sure who the intended audience is for this one, but I’m glad it was a library book and I wasn’t out much more than a small amount of time, and because I pre-read it before starting it with my kids, they never knew what they were missing.

Saturday the Rabbi Went HungrySaturday the Rabbi Went HungrySaturday the Rabbi Went Hungry by Harry Kemelman by Harry Kemelman

The second in the series begun with Friday the Rabbi Slept Late. You could easily pick this one up without having read the first, and while there is a bit of backstory you won’t know, it’s not at all essential to the plot of this one. It still feels so dated at times, but I liked it well enough I’ve checked out the third third in the series – Sunday the Rabbi Stayed HomeSunday the Rabbi Stayed Home by Harry Kemelman.

Betrayal of TrustBetrayal of TrustBetrayal of Trust (J. P. Beaumont #19) (J. P. Beaumont Novel) by J. A. Jance by J. A. Jance

This one wasn’t my favorite – maybe I need to save Jance’s books for vacation, because I really preferred the one I read last year while traveling. Or maybe I just didn’t enjoy the teenage bullying plot line. Either way, I’ll read the next, because it’s so far into the series and I am invested in the characters, but it’s not a priority.

Lost in a Good BookLost in a Good BookLost in a Good Book (A Thursday Next Novel) by Jasper Fforde by Jasper Fforde

Second in the Thursday Next series, and it continues the craziness of the series begun in The Eyre Affair. I’m already in the middle of book #3, The Well of Lost PlotsThe Well of Lost Plots (Thursday Next Series) by Jasper Fforde, as I do like Thursday as a character, and this book ends leaving me desperate to know what happens next.

Ever After High The Storybook of LegendsEver After High: The Storybook of LegendsEver After High: The Storybook of Legends by Shannon Hale and Ever After High: The Unfairest of Them AllEver After High: The Unfairest of Them All by Shannon Hale by Shannon Hale

While I love fractured fairy tales, and I love Shannon Hale as an author, this combo of the two didn’t work for me at all. There are lots of pop-culture references/silliness in this story that grated on me, and the puns were NONSTOP. I think maybe you need to be a tween girl to fully appreciate this series, and I’m not tempted to read any more in it.

Ever After High Unfairest of Them AllApparently I’m alone in that though, because it seems like it’s a HUGE hit, and there is tons of merchandise for it. I had no idea until I was at the store looking for baseball cards for my husband’s birthday and there was a big display of Ever After High dolls and other items. (Turns out baseball cards are in the toy section. Who knew?)

Instead, read Book of a Thousand Days or The Princess Academy for better books by Hale.

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Quick Lit for March 2015: Recent Re-Reads

I seem to go on re-reading kicks, and lately I’ve been on another one. Happily, they’ve all been great books to read again:

The Road from Coorain by Jill Ker ConwayThe Road from CoorainThe Road from Coorain by Jill Ker Conway by Jill Ker Conway

Rereading this one because it was book club’s March pick. I picked it up with some trepidation, because I was the one who pushed for it to be the month’s pick – what if I ended up thinking that I shouldn’t have recommended it? Instead, while the very beginning was a bit slower than I remembered, the rest of it was as strong as I’d recalled. It’s a very thoughtful book, but so worth reading (just be warned that it can be a tough one too – there are difficult events recounted). It also made for a *fabulous* discussion book – I was supposed to facilitate the discussion, but most of it ended up being organic as there is just so much to talk about in the book. (Read my original review on it)

The Eyre AffairThe Eyre Affair: A Thursday Next NovelThe Eyre Affair: A Thursday Next Novel by Jasper Fforde by Jasper Fforde

Reread to prepare myself for reading additional titles in the series (and because it’s an easy read, so reading it again wouldn’t take long.) It’s such an odd book and premise, but lots of fun. It also makes it very hard to ever read Jane Eyre again without imagining agent Thursday Next’s behind the scenes role in that story. 🙂

Princess BrideThe Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern’s Classic Tale of True Love and High AdventureThe Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman by William Goldman

Reread after reading As You Wish, and because it’s August’s book club pick. Super fun, especially after having just finished Elwes’ memoir.

The ThiefThe Thief The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner by Megan Whalen Turner

Reread as I get ready to finally read the last in the series – A Conspiracy of KingsA Conspiracy of Kings (Thief of Eddis). Or at least the last one so far – there’s still supposed to be more books, but there’s no indication on a publication date. I adore this series and almost don’t want to read the last one, as it’ll mean I no longer have it to look forward to reading eventually. (Read my original reviews on The Thief, and the second and third in the series – The Queen of Attolia, and The King of Attolia).

CinderCinderBook Review: Cinder (Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer by Marissa Meyer

Reread as I waited my turn at FairestFairest: The Lunar Chronicles: Levana's Story by Marissa Meyer. I love this series too, and it was maybe even more fun the second time through it. Will I reread them all before WinterWinter (The Lunar Chronicles) by Marissa Meyer is published? Perhaps… (Read my original reviews on Cinder, and also Scarlet, Cress)

For more peeks at what people are reading, head over to Modern Mrs. Darcy’s link-up!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Shades of Grey

Shades of GreyShades of Grey: A NovelShades of Grey: A Novel by Jasper Fforde by Jasper Fforde

Don’t even consider reading this book if you’re not a fan of crazily-involved world building that seems to go along with some fantasy and dystopian novels. This one is a huge book, but the actual plot is fairly thin – instead it’s packed with tons of details about this alternative society where your color perception determines your status.

It’s completely goofy, with numerous little jokes that had me chuckling, and other parts that had me wondering if it was a joke that I was missing. I can’t even begin to really explain it it’s such an odd book, so I’ll simply leave it as that if you like this sort of thing I thought it was lots of fun.

My biggest aggravation with the book is that somehow I missed that it’s the first in a planned trilogy, and the other books aren’t going to be released until 2015. Aargh! I hate it when I miss that – I want to read the rest of it now, and by the time the other books are out I’ll likely have to reread this one. Everything is so involved and quirky that I’m likely to forget some of the small details that will end up mattering.

If you’ve read his Thursday Next novels (such as The Eyre AffairThe Eyre Affair: A Thursday Next Novel by Jasper Fforde) and like that kind of this-is-not-the-world-I-know aspect, and can just roll with what he’s developing in this series, I did really have fun reading it. If I had to pick between the two, I like Thursday Next more, but that’s mostly because of the literary-focus of that world.

Publisher’s Description:
Welcome to Chromatacia, where the societal hierarchy is strictly regulated by one’s limited color perception. And Eddie Russet wants to move up. But his plans to leverage his better-than-average red perception and marry into a powerful family are quickly upended. Juggling inviolable rules, sneaky Yellows, and a risky friendship with an intriguing Grey named Jane who shows Eddie that the apparent peace of his world is as much an illusion as color itself, Eddie finds he must reckon with the cruel regime behind this gaily painted façade.

Book Details

Title: Shades of Grey: A NovelShades of Grey: A Novel by Jasper Fforde
Author: Jasper Fforde
Category: Fiction / Dystopian
My Rating: 3.5 Stars. Or 4. I keep going back and forth on it. 🙂

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!