Recent Readalouds: The Princess in Black series

Princess in Black 1 and 2

The Princess in Black and The Perfect Princess Party by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale, illustrated by LeUyen Pham

Books one and two of the series were birthday gifts to my daughter, and she loved them. I wasn’t sure how they’d be as readalouds – they’re suitable for somewhat newer readers, and sometimes those books can be painful to read aloud. I should have trusted Hale, as these were fun.

They are quite silly, but not in an obnoxious way, instead in a this-is-delightful-to-young-kids way. The illustrations are wonderful too, and there are lots of them, making this book a nice bridge between picture books and chapter books.

Princess Magnolia is appealing, and while I think the books were just about perfect for a 5 year old girl to listen to, my 7 year old son happily listened in as well. Admittedly, his favorite parts were when Magnolia is battling the monsters.

Book #3 releases in paperback just in time for Christmas (and I’ve already pre-ordered it), and the final book in the series releases in hardcover in November. I’m holding off on it only because the other books we’ll have will all be paperbacks, and it kind of bugs me to have the series be mismatched on our shelves. Fingers crossed that book #4 will be out in paperback before her next birthday in 2017.

They’re not books that I want to read aloud again and again and again, but it’s fun to read them a handful of times, and then have my daughter “read” them herself is fantastic. I’m sure once she starts reading for real she’ll tackle these on her own again too.


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Two years ago: Yes, Chef by Marcus Samuelsson with Veronica Chambers
Three years ago: God’s Bestseller by Brian Moynahan

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Recent Readaloud: Owls in the Family

Owls in the FamilyOwls in the Family by Farley Mowat

One of G’s school books, and I’ve heard about this title before, but had never read it. I’m so glad it was included in the curriculum, because it was such a enjoyable read, and worked really well as a readaloud!

Listeners who are sensitive may be troubled by some scenes, and it is a bit dated (it was published originally in 1961), but my 4 & 6 year olds had no trouble with it.

My verdict:

Charming story about a boy who has two owls as pets. I was sad to reach the end of it, and have looked for additional titles by Mowat.

The kids’ verdict:
They both really enjoyed it. I think both kids were intrigued (and a bit jealous) of the freedom the boys in the story had.

Publisher’s Description:
Farley Mowat’s funniest book tells the adventures of Wol and Weeps, two owls from Saskatchewan who shape up a whole neighbourhood, turn a house topsy-turvy, and outsmart Mutt, the dog hero of The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be. Wol brings dead skunks to the family dinner table and terrorizes the minister, the postman, and the French teacher. Weeps is a comical bird, afraid of everything except Mutt, and he never does learn how to fly. Here is the heartwarming story of how a boy named Billy finds Wol and Weeps and unwittingly adds two new members to the family.

Book Details

Title: Owls in the Family
Author: Farley Mowat
Category: Children’s Nonfiction
My Rating: 4 Stars

Find the book: Print | Goodreads

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: The Lady and the Panda

Recent Sequel Readalouds

I’m getting backlogged on writing about our readalouds (we’re moving through them faster now) so here’s a post catching me up to date on some of the sequels and pseudo-sequels I’ve read to my son, with my daughter listening in as she wants.

More Milly Molly MandyMore Milly-Molly-MandyMore Milly-Molly-Mandy by Joyce Lankester Brisley by Joyce Lankester Brisley

We’re all fans of Milly-Molly-Mandy, and this book is a not-essential sequel to the Sonlight book we read last year, The Milly-Molly-Mandy StorybookThe Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook by Joyce Lankester Brisley. If you liked the first set of stories, you’ll likely enjoy this as well. It’s more of the same, with no surprises. However, it’s not really necessary to have read the first book, as you’ll quickly catch up on the setting and characters. These are excellent first-chapter books, as each chapter stands on its own, and helps develop those listening skills.


Penny and PeterPenny and PeterPenny and Peter by Carolyn Haywood by Carolyn Haywood

This sequel picks up right where Here’s a Penny left off. This book has a lot less of his next door friend, and the focus is instead on Peter as well as Penny (no surprise with the title). Another one where if you liked the first, you’ll probably like this one too. I would recommend not reading this one before Here’s a Penny – you’ll spoil yourself as far as some particulars go.


Dolphin TreasureDolphin TreasureDolphin Treasure by Wayne Grover, illustrated by Jim Fowler by Wayne Grover, illustrated by Jim Fowler

My son was not into this one as much as the first book, Dolphin Adventure. I’m not sure why, as I felt they were pretty similar stories, although this one did take a bit longer to get to the point of any significant action. That’s probably enough of a reason for him to have been less interested in it. 🙂


Five True Dog StoriesFive True Dog StoriesFive True Dog Stories by Margaret Davidson by Margaret Davidson

A sentimental favorite for me, as I’d read this as a child, and recognized the stories and the illustrations. My son really liked 4 of the stories, but one of them did not keep his interest at all. I prefer this book to the Five True Horse Stories, so if you’re debating between them, go for this one. And yes, this isn’t a true sequel, but more of another book in a similar style.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Two years ago: Book Review: Buried in the Sky by Peter Zuckerman and Amanda Padoan
Three years ago: Reading Less / Reading More

Recent Readaloud: No Children, No Pets

No Children No PetsNo Children, No Pets by Marion Holland

An unexpectedly enjoyable book. It’s an older title, and can be hard to track down, but it was included with our Sonlight Core A readalouds. If your library doesn’t have it and you have trouble locating it, it’s not an absolute must-read (in other words, don’t go to extreme effort or expense to find a copy), but if you can easily obtain it, it was fun to readaloud.

The Florida setting was one of my favorite parts (I am partial to it, as that’s where I grew up), and the slight mystery included in the plot held my son’s interest to the point where we read the last four chapters in one day – we both wanted to find out how everything resolved!

A warning though: it is old-fashioned, especially with occasional remarks about “women’s work.” If you are adamantly opposed to books with that sort of thing in it, you’ll likely want to pass on it.

Find the book: It’s out of print, and used copies are very expensive on Amazon. Sonlight has republished it themselves, and you may still be better off buying a copy from them and paying their shipping fees | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Three children and their widowed mother inherit a run-down apartment building in Florida. A sign on the front door says “No Children, No Pets.” Adventure awaits as the kids solve lingering mysteries and help fix up the building. A satisfying childhood tale that keeps you guessing what will happen next.

Book Details

Title: No Children, No Pets
Author: Marion Holland
Category: Juvenile Fiction
My Rating: 4.5 Stars

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Curtsies & Conspiracies by Gail Carriger
Two years ago: Book Review: Code Name Pauline by Pearl Witherington Cornioley and Kathryn J. Atwood
Three years ago: Biggest Disappointments of 2012

7QT on taekwondo, a literary advent, oils, long weekends, and more books

Seven Quick Takes

— 1 —

The big kids have a taekwondo tournament next weekend. I dithered about putting them in it, but apparently I am a sucker for them begging to do the tournaments, because I have yet to say no to any of the local ones. Fortunately there are only two local ones a year, so it’s not like I’m saying yes all that often.

G is especially excited because as a purple belt, he is able to participate in the board breaking competition. He’s wanting to earn a gold medal by breaking all of his boards!

— 2 —

Advent Book-a-DayA heads-up on a special offer right now: if you’re looking to start a new holiday tradition with a book-a-day advent calendar, check out this great deal: 24 NEW books, for $110, tax & shipping included. That’s under $5 a book. These are not necessarily Christmas-themed books, so you can continue to enjoy them throughout the year.

Let me know if you’re interested – order have to go in soon to ensure you have all the books by December 1!

Curious to know more? Check out these videos, for kids ages 0-7, and kids ages 4-9.

— 3 —

My oils order this month is a *huge* one, because they were having such a great customer special – 6 free oils once my order was high enough. I got sneaky and asked my friends and family if they had any oils they needed or wanted to try, to help get my order total up. It totally worked, so they get oils, I got to put in a bigger order than I personally needed, and I will be getting lots of free oils. A definite win-win!

No picture yet, as it’s still on the way, so instead here’s a (small) picture of last month’s shipment. Not pictured: the free diffuser, and the extra oils I ordered for friends and family and already distributed to them. That’s right, I did the same thing last month. More bonuses for me. 🙂

October ER order

— 4 —

Last week was just ridiculously amazing as far as the weather goes. The kids got a ton of outside time, and I had the windows and doors open enjoying the temps and breeze. Knowing that it wouldn’t last made it that much sweeter. This week has definitely been cooler, and the kids aren’t as interested in playing outside for long. It’s not even that cold, but with their aversion to shoes they don’t make it too long before they’re ready to come in. Once it gets even colder they’ll finally concede that yes, they should wear shoes, and a coat, and gloves, etc., and they should be good to play outside again for more than 5 minutes.

— 5 —

Sticker Dolly Dressing Fashion Designer Activity PackWhen I got my Usborne starter kit shipment I unpacked it while the kids were around. Which was nice, as I got to see their reactions, but then I was having to keep them from running off with them immediately. H especially claimed several of them – of course they were for her, weren’t they? Later G pulled aside the books for him, and the books for baby M. It was so cute!

What did H claim most insistently? The Sticker Dolly Dressing Fashion Designer Activity Pack, of course. It’s pretty, and it’s got dolls on the cover, and it’s stickers, and why *wouldn’t* it be for her?

— 6 —

My husband’s job has a use-it-or-lose-it vacation day policy (unlike his last place which allowed/encouraged stockpiling of days). What that means for us right now is when he’s got days left at towards the end of the year he has to take them. So, he’s got a lot of three day weekends in his future! 🙂

— 7 —

My Kitchen YearTwo “best books finished recently” to mention. The first is a nonfiction audiobook: Ruth Reichl’s latest memoir/cookbook, My Kitchen Year. I enjoyed listening to it, but the drawback to doing it that way is that it’s much harder to make note of any recipes that sound tempting. I am such a fan of her nonfiction.

No Children No PetsThe other one was a surprise – No Children, No Pets. It was a readaloud for G’s school, and I wasn’t super excited about starting it. But it ended up being such a fun read. The timing was nice too, as we’d just gotten home from a trip to Florida so reading about that setting was a little more fun for him.

I wouldn’t go out of your way to hunt it down to read as an adult, but as a sweet, old-fashioned readaloud for kids this one gets two thumbs up!

For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t The Lyceum!

Disclosure: Amazon links are affiliate links, but none of the others are. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Twerp by Mark Goldblatt
Two years ago: Book Review: In the Shadow of Blackbirds by Cat Winters
Three years ago: Book Review: Perfectly Unique by Annie Downs

Recent Readaloud: Mary on Horseback

Mary on HorsebackMary On Horseback: Three Mountain StoriesMary On Horseback: Three Mountain Stories by Rosemary Wells by Rosemary Wells

Don’t avoid this book, thinking it’s only for children. It’s a trio of well-told stories about Mary Breckinridge, who founded the Frontier Nursing Service in rural Kentucky after World War I. It’s not a true biography, but just a set of vignettes from her life.

Although it made me wish for a real biography about her – what an amazing woman! I did find an autobiography, but some reviews make me think it wouldn’t have the focus I’d want. I may or may not search it out.

As a readaloud, it’s one of the more challenging ones I’ve read to my son. The chapters are longer than most of what we read, and the topic wasn’t as immediately compelling for him. He listened to it, but was glad we never read more than one chapter a day. I wouldn’t use this with kids who aren’t already used to listening to chapter books.

If you’re homeschooling or just looking to supplement other schooling, this could work well as a readaloud for elementary school about the early 20th century in America. It appears to be a fairly popular library title, so it might be easy to try it for your family.

Recommended, for the right audience.

My verdict:

Loved it, even if it did make me teary-eyed at times.

The kids’ verdict:

G (6) thought it was ok. H (4) did not stick around for it. It’s a better fit for older listeners.

Find the book: Print | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
In 1923, Mary Breckinridge (who had been a nurse in WWI) learned about the nonexistent medical facilities in Appalachian Kentucky, and founded the Frontier Nursing Service — a group of women who traveled by horseback to isolated mountain residents to provide medical care. These three compelling, poignant stories, each with a different narrator – a boy whose father almost loses his leg; a nurse in training; a mute young girl who realizes she might have a career in medicine – show Mary’s effect on the people and world around her, brought to vivid life by master storyteller Rosemary Wells.

Book Details

Title: Mary On Horseback: Three Mountain StoriesMary On Horseback: Three Mountain Stories by Rosemary Wells
Author: Rosemary Wells
Category: Children’s Nonfiction

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Poirot Investigates by Agatha Christie
Two years ago: Book Review: Waiting at Joe’s by Deeny Kaplan Lorber
Three years ago: Author Interview with Annie Downs

What the Kids are Reading (in September 2015)

I Always ALWAYS Get My WayI Always, ALWAYS Get My WayI Always, ALWAYS Get My Way by Thad Krasnesky, illustrated by David Parkins by Thad Krasnesky, illustrated by David Parkins

Read daily (often several times a day) for weeks – my daughter especially loved it. Fun language and great illustrations, plus a satisfying conclusion.

Where is the Green SheepWhere Is the Green Sheep? Where Is the Green Sheep? by Mem Fox, illustrated by Judy Horacek by Mem Fox, illustrated by Judy Horacek

Deceptively simple, but it has wonderful repetition. Why did it take me so long to read a book by Fox?

Double Trouble in Walla WallaDouble Trouble In Walla WallaDouble Trouble In Walla Walla by Andrew Clements, illustrated by Salvatore Murdocca by Andrew Clements, illustrated by Salvatore Murdocca

I did eventually have to stash this one in the library bag, after about a dozen readings, because the kids adored it. The language is so. much. fun. But after all those readings, my tongue was tired of being twisted, and I had had enough. Well illustrated, and I need to look into Clements’ other books, because this one was such a hit.

Higher HigherHigher! Higher! (Leslie Patricelli board books)Higher! Higher! by Leslie Patricelli by Leslie Patricelli

No surprises here – it’s a typical Patricelli book. (That’s not a complaint.)

Over in the WetlandsOver in the Wetlands: A Hurricane-on-the-Bayou Story by Caroline Starr Rose, illustrated by Rob Dunlaver

Beautifully written, with great rhythm so it’s fun to read aloud. The illustrations are lovely, although some of them are so dark (appropriately for the topic, but my kids still thought they couldn’t see anything on those pages). A better fit as an older picture book – my six-year-old enjoyed it a lot more than his four-year-old sister.

0-439-70049-3Where’s Walrus?Where's Walrus? by Stephen Savage by Stephen Savage

Really amusing wordless book. Both kids were hugely entertained by finding the walrus, and imagining what he was doing in each scene.

This Little ChickThis Little ChickThis Little Chick by John Lawrence by John Lawrence

Enjoyable read with lots of fun opportunities to make animal sounds. That always makes for a popular book here. 🙂

The Busy Little SquirrelThe Busy Little SquirrelThe Busy Little Squirrel (Classic Board Books) by Nancy Tafuri by Nancy Tafuri

A cute enough story about the seasons, but it suffered a bit in comparison to some of the better ones we’ve read recently. I was underwhelmed by the illustrations, and Where’s Green Sheep and This Little Chick had more interesting repetitive structures.

Farmer DuckFarmer DuckFarmer Duck by Martin Waddell, illustrations by Helen Oxenbury by Martin Waddell, illustrations by Helen Oxenbury

Another one where they liked it but didn’t LOVE it like others.

Q is for DuckQ Is for Duck: An Alphabet Guessing GameQ Is for Duck: An Alphabet Guessing Game by Mary Elting and Michael Folsom, illustrated by Jack Kent by Mary Elting and Michael Folsom, illustrated by Jack Kent

My son was very entertained by the riddles in this, especially since he figured them out easily.

Wolf Won't BiteWolf Won’t Bite!Wolf Won't Bite! by Emily Gravett by Emily Gravett

I loved the illustrations in this one, and my kids loved repeating the “Wolf Won’t Bite!” refrain, but they were a little bit traumatized by the ending. And my kids are not generally sensitive readers at all

Squid and Octopus Friends for AlwaysSquid and Octopus: Friends for AlwaysSquid and Octopus: Friends for Always by Tao Nyeu by Tao Nyeu

This is a nice bridge book as it’s a longer picture book, divided into four “chapters.” It reminded me of another book, but I can’t figure out which one, and that’s been driving me batty since finishing this one. It’s cute, but not one I feel any significant desire to borrow again.

Ten Nine EightTen, Nine, Eight Board BookTen, Nine, Eight Board Book (Caldecott Collection) by Molly Bang by Molly Bang

A gentle bedtime book – I liked the counting-down aspect. I think it was a little too gentle for my older two, and they weren’t interested in it. Maybe they needed to have heard it for the first time as younger kids?

Wodney Wat's WobotWodney Wat’s WobotWodney Wat's Wobot by Helen Lester, illustrated by Lynn Munsinger by Helen Lester, illustrated by Lynn Munsinger

I didn’t like reading this one out loud (had a terrible time with actually reading a “w” sound instead of an “r” sound), and was glad the kids seemed mostly indifferent towards it. It went right back into the library bag.

The Crown on Your HeadThe Crown on Your HeadThe Crown on Your Head by Nancy Tillman by Nancy Tillman

The illustrations are pretty (although not my preferred style), but some of the text was so sappy and saccharine that I found myself all but rolling my eyes while reading it. This one also went right back into the library bag after one reading.


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: A College of Magics by Caroline Stevermer
Two years ago: Cooking the Book: Weelicious (Broccoli Pesto) by Catherine McCord
Three years ago: Library Love

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Recent Readaloud: Five True Horse Stories

5 True Horse Stories | Review by @SheilaRCraigFive True Horse StoriesFive True Horse Stories by Margaret Davidson | Review by @SheilaRCraig by Margaret Davidson

I was expecting this to just be another readaloud with the kids, and bought it for our trip to Arizona, as I was looking for something small and light to take on the plane. Instead it turned out to be a nostalgia-filled experience: I read this exact book when I was a child. I remembered the stories (some of the specific phrases as well), and the illustrations were instantly recognizable.

It made me so happy I’d grabbed this on a whim. That said, I’m not sure how impressed I’d have been if I didn’t have that nostalgic glow associated with it. The writing is serviceable, but nothing special, and it’s not one I’m excited to reread with them.

My verdict:
It’s dated at times, but not so much that it’s off-putting. Although, I was a bit surprised at how sad the one story is, and yet it’s presented so matter-of-factly, so consider this a heads-up if you’ve got sensitive listeners/readers!

The kids’ verdict:
They liked it, and kept asking me to read more, so it held their interest, but they didn’t ask for it to be repeated.

Find the book: Print | Goodreads

Publisher’s Description:
Five wonderful, true stories about real horses–a Morgan, a Mustang, a wild pony, a performing horse, and even a donkey.


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: The Harlot’s Tale by Sam Thomas
Two years ago: Together: Growing Appetites for God by Carrie Ward
Three years ago: How to Find Great Books to Read

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

Recent Readaloud: Here’s a Penny

Here's a PennyHere’s a PennyHere's a Penny by Carolyn Haywood by Carolyn Haywood

A Sonlight book that I’m not likely to have picked up on my own. I’d never heard of it, and the cover didn’t grab me. The only reason I *might* have tried it is because of the familiarity of the author’s name.

They stories are sweet, in an old-fashioned way. A heads-up if you’re reading to children with any issues related to adoption: Penny is adopted and then he gains a brother at the end of the book by another adoption. I tried to gloss over this a bit, because G REALLY wants another baby so he can have a brother, and the book makes it seem so easy – just ask your parents, and you’ll get your brother! We quickly finished it and I went into distraction mode with other books.

There’s a sequel, Penny and PeterPenny and Peter by Carolyn Haywood. I’d hoped to get it from the library, but it wasn’t available. I ended up buying a copy, because G liked it enough and wanted to know what happened next with Penny.

My verdict:
Easy to readaloud, the chapters are a nice length too for keeping their interest. They’re not as short as true beginning chapter books, but each one is generally 10 – 14 pages. The illustrations scattered throughout the text are nice, but their style doesn’t match with the cover art. I’m wondering if they’re original to the text – I know the versions currently in print have updated covers, which would explain the difference in style.

The kids’ verdict:
G enjoyed it – after reading one chapter a day for two days, we put it aside for our trip (and recovery). Picking it up again, I gave him a quick refresher as to what had taken place. Then I read chapter 3, and there were immediate requests for another one! Another one! Another one! Yeah, we read the final 8 chapters in two days, and if I’d been able to finish in in one day he’d have happily listened to it.

H semi-listened to it, but she didn’t complain when we finished it without her.

Publisher’s Description:
His name is not Penn or Penrose or anything that would make you think of Penny. His real name is William. But when his parents first saw him as a baby, with his red face and red-gold curls, they said, “My goodness. He looks like a brand-new copper penny.” And Penny is what they call him.

Now Penny is six years old, and this is the story of his adventures at home and in school. Many of them include his two best friends, Patsy and Peter, and his two kittens, Really and Truly. Penny learns how special it is to be adopted, what it means to belong in a family, and even, in the end, how it feels to have a new brother.

Book Details

Title: Here’s a PennyHere's a Penny by Carolyn Haywood
Author: Carolyn Haywood
Category: Children’s Fiction

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

What the Kids are Reading (in July 2015)

What the Kids are Reading July 2015Lots of books because it was a two-library-visit month. It was also the end of the summer reading program but I spaced it and forgot before the deadline and the kids never got to turn in their cards and redeem their points for prizes. Nobody tell them what they missed out on, ok?

The Right WordThe Right Word: Roget and His ThesaurusThe Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet

I absolutely adored this book. It’s so clever, and the illustrations and text layout work so well for the story. That said, this is a picture book that works better for older readers – it didn’t engage my daughter at all. My son liked it more, although it still wasn’t his favorite. Sniffle.

Duck RabbitDuck! Rabbit!Duck! Rabbit! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

Another one that is so clever. The illustration is fabulous – is it a duck? is it a rabbit? The text works through which it could be, with two unseen narrators each picking a different option. Lots of fun to read, and both kids enjoyed it. The little surprise at the end amused me as well.

You Nest Here with MeYou Nest Here With MeYou Nest Here With Me by Jane Yolen and Heidi Stemple, illustrated by Melissa Sweet by Jane Yolen and Heidi Stemple, illustrated by Melissa Sweet

A gentle read that would be ideal for bedtime. There’s lots of information packed into it as well, and my son really liked reading the extra details about the birds at the back of the book.

Clara and DavieClara and DavieClara and Davie by Patricia Polacco by Patricia Polacco

I love Polacco, and this is another typical one for her. Fun illustrations, and nice story. It’s another one where it worked better for my son than daughter, as it didn’t keep her interest that much.

Carmine a Little More RedCarmine: A Little More RedCarmine: A Little More Red by Melissa Sweet by Melissa Sweet

A reimagination of the Red Riding Hood story, by an illustrator I love. Cute story, cute illustrations, and some great vocabulary. The familiar story pleased my kids, and they liked the way it wasn’t *exactly* the story they knew.

Elsie's BirdElsie’s BirdElsie's Bird by Jane Yolen, illustrated by David Small by Jane Yolen, illustrated by David Small

Yolen is such a reliable author that I’m willing to try anything of hers I find on the library shelf. This is an enjoyable book, but not one my kids asked to be repeated. The illustrations are lovely.

Hooray for Amanda and Her Alligator!Hooray for Amanda & Her Alligator!Hooray for Amanda & Her Alligator! by Mo Willems by Mo Willems

Willems is always a hit in our house, and this is no exception. Fun story with a nice twist at the end.

Waiting is EasyWaiting Is Not Easy! (An Elephant and Piggie Book)Waiting Is Not Easy! (An Elephant and Piggie Book) by Mo Willems by Mo Willems

Another Willems, this one is reading practice for my son. It’s as great as the Elephant and Piggie books usually are.

Earth-Shaking Facts about EarthquakesThe Earth-Shaking Facts about Earthquakes with Max Axiom, Super ScientistThe Earth-Shaking Facts about Earthquakes with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science) by Katherine Krohn, illustrated by Tod G Smith and Al Milgram by Katherine Krohn, illustrated by Tod G Smith and Al Milgram

One of my son’s birthday books, and he continues to love this series.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!