Books I Read in September 2017

September was a fantastic month of nonfiction! It wasn’t a bad month in fiction either, but the nonfiction is what really stood out for me.

    Fiction

  1. Throne of Jade by Naomi Novik

    Book #2 in the Temeraire series, and I enjoyed this one almost as much as the first. What I especially enjoyed was the setup this one provides for future books in the series, and I’m eager to read more and see where Novik takes the characters.

  2. The Shattered Tree by Charles Todd

    So many coincidences to help Bess figure out the mystery, and too little of some secondary characters, but I’m still glad I read this entry in the Bess Crawford series. I’m both curious and concerned to know how Todd handles the end of the war – Bess serving as a nurse at the front is such a big part of the series, so what will happen with it once the war ends? If you’ve read later books in the series and know the answer to this question, don’t tell me; I’ll get there eventually.

  3. A Matter of Justice by Charles Todd

    I do imagine Bess meeting up with Ian Rutledge, and Todd having his two series collide in a sense. Hey, J. A. Jance did it once with her two series. This entry in the Rutledge series was less a complete whodunnit and a bit more of a howdunnit, but I always enjoy following along as he solves his cases, and rooting for him as he clashes with his boss at Scotland Yard.

  4. Final Account by Peter Robinson

    A re-read as I continue on with the Inspector Banks series, and get closer to catching up to where I left off with it pre-kids. It’s fun seeing the hints of events that happen in future books being dropped in these earlier titles, and it’s striking how much Robinson improved as a mystery author. In other words, read the early entries in the Banks series to get to know the characters, but realize that the later ones are much better.

  5. Just Killing Time by Julianne Holmes

    A cute cozy mystery. I was in the mood for something more in the light-and-fluffy mystery realm and this fit the bill. I may read the second one when I’m looking for another title of that sort. If those are your preferred mysteries, I think you might enjoy this one as well.

  6. Innocent Graves by Peter Robinson

    Listened to this one, as I continue to re-read the earlier ones in the series to get caught up with where I left off reading them.

  7. Nonfiction

  8. Come and Eat: A Celebration of Love and Grace Around the Everyday Table by Bri McKoy

    (Review title) Thought-provoking, and with some tasty sounding recipes as well. I enjoyed it quite a lot, and recommend it.

  9. Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America by Firoozeh Dumas

    Entertaining account and I hope it works well as a discussion title.

  10. Of Mess and Moxie: Wrangling Delight Out of This Wild and Glorious Life by Jen Hatmaker

    LOVED this as an audiobook, so if you’re on the fence as far as which format to get, GET THE AUDIO. Hatmaker is funny and friendly, and so thought-provoking. I thought it connected well with Come and Eat, which I’d just finished right around when I was listening to Mess and Moxie.

  11. The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann

    Fascinating, both the modern story, and the earlier story that forms the basis for the search. I love reading about people doing things where I have ZERO desire to do that as well (see: Walking the Amazon) and this is another perfect example of that. I’m tempted to watch the movie that’s based on this book, to see how they adapted the two storylines.

  12. Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown

    SO. GOOD. I’m not entirely sure how to put some of the idas into practice in my life as a mom though, but it gave me so much to think about and consider.

  13. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck

    Also loved this one, and the research behind it, and the stories Dweck uses to support her conclusions. It gave me so much to think about, both looking back on my life, but especially looking ahead. How can I keep a growth mindset for myself (in all areas; I’ve always done well at having one in some areas, but not at all in others), but especially now, how do I help cultivate one in my kids?

  14. Barking Up the Wrong Tree: The Surprising Science Behind Why Everything You Know About Success Is (Mostly) Wrong by Eric Barker

    Loved this summary of what research shows about success, and how to achieve it. Even more, I loved the stories Barker includes that illustrate his points about success and the ways people have achieved it, both in expected and unexpected ways. My only disappointment was when I finished it and discovered that it’s Barker’s only book; I was hoping to find that he had a half dozen other titles to enjoy. If you like Malcolm Gladwell, try this for a similar feel.

  15. Reading People: How Seeing the World through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything by Anne Bogel

    Interesting summary look at various personality typing systems, and how to use them to make improvements in your own life. Reading it, and then reading the Gretchen Rubin book The Four Tendencies, I wish Bogel’s book had come out later (or Rubin’s earlier), so Bogel could also have included a chapter on the four tendencies – I’d be interested in how she condensed it down and put her own spin on it.

  16. The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better (and Other People’s Lives Better, Too) by Gretchen Rubin

    A fascinating look into the four tendencies, and great ideas about how to work with your own tendency, and the tendencies of people around you. I got slightly sidetracked from the book itself by one story about an obliger because their way of approaching life is so completely different than mine (questioner here).

  17. Kid Lit

  18. Ride on, Will Cody! by Caroline Starr Rose, illustrated by Joe Lillington

    Beautifully illustrated, nicely told. I’m such a fangirl for Rose’s work.

  19. Baby by Patricia Maclachlan

    Sweet middle-grade story, but not a must-read for adults.

  20. Return to Gone-Away by Elizabeth Enright

    Fun conclusion to the story begun in Gone-Away Lake. I look forward to letting my kids read these books in the near(ish) future.

  21. Prairie School by Lois Lenski

    One of the books in Lenski’s Regional America series. I like the look at American life in very specific times and places, although it also includes some of the drawbacks to that as well.

  22. Nothing by Annie Barrows

    I so wanted to love this book, but found it disappointing overall. It’s really easy to read, and the two main characters are appealing. But there is so much casual profanity, and drug use mentioned, and some (slight) sexual content, that isn’t balanced by anything beneficial in the book. I get that the book is trying to show how much is happening during years teens say nothing is happening, but ultimately, I didn’t find it offered enough of anything to justify the reading time.

  23. The Grave of Lainey Grace by Aaron Galvin

    Love the magical touches in the story (leprechauns!) but the character development is weak to the point of unbelievability. As a younger reader, I doubt I’d have noticed though, and would have just enjoyed the story.

  24. Like Pickle Juice on a Cookie
  25. Like Bug Juice on a Burger
  26. Like Carrot Juice on a Cupcake by Julie Sternberg, illustrated by Matthew Cordell

    Cute novels in verse. They all can stand alone, but there is a bit of progression between them, so there’s a slight advantage to reading them in order. The illustrations are sweet as well, and fit the book nicely.

Never Finished

  • Mr. Rochester by Sarah Shoemaker

    I thought, yes! I’ll read another Jane Eyre-inspired book! And I started it and the writing is engaging and I was caring about Rochester and I realized that no, I did not want to read the book. I was expecting him to get his heart stomped on by life (and his awful father and lousy brother) and no, I didn’t want to put myself through it. So I sent it back to the library after only a couple of chapters.


  • Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

    Books I Read in July 2017

    What a great reading month! I did a lot of listening to audio books, which is why my reading total is so high – 11 of the books I finished were audio titles!

    Books Read in July 2017

      Mysteries

    1. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

      So. Good. It’s a story-within-a-story, and the framework is really well done and made for such a fun book. I listened to it, and the narrators did an excellent job. Plus I didn’t figure out either solution (although I had a suspicion about one of them, I couldn’t get the why behind it.)

    2. The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell

      An enjoyable follow-up to both Jane Eyre and the biography on Charlotte Brontë I’d recently read. I think it’d have been even better if I’d ever read Wuthering Heights and/or Agnes Grey!

    3. A False Mirror by Charles Todd

      The premise behind this one was absurd, but I do like Inspector Rutledge, so I just kind of nodded and went with the ridiculousness of the setup.

    4. An Unwilling Accomplice by Charles Todd

      Another favorite mystery series because of my affection for the main characters, not because of any individual title. It’s worth starting at the beginning of the series, although it’s not as essential as it would be with other series.

    5. Other Fiction

    6. Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal

      Lots of potential in this one, and it was a really good book, but missed out on being really great. The narrators are excellent, so as long as you don’t mind lots of profanity (in one section at least), it’s a good one to listen to on audio.

    7. Among Others by Jo Walton

      I’m not even sure what to say about this one exactly – I loved it, and read it in under 24 hours. I liked the idea behind it, the setting, the bookworm main character. And yet, looking at it objectively, it’s not one I can recommend to anyone and everyone. It doesn’t really have all that much action – there’s lots of day-to-day recounting of boarding school events, and tons of science fiction books and authors mentioned. I think it’s a book that’s either going to fit the reader so well that they love it, or leave a reader cold, wondering why on earth there isn’t anything happening.

    8. Road to Paradise by Karen Barnett

      Sweet story, but not my type of book overall. I thought it was going to be a historical mystery and it’s a historical Christian romance. I did like the setting!

    9. Nonfiction

    10. On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety by Andrea Petersen

      Really interesting, and well-written. Petersen takes her own story and expands it to give a look at anxiety in general, and various treatments for it. It was a fascinating account.

    11. My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues by Pamela Paul

      I’d expected to love this one, and certainly to find it more interesting than On Edge. Instead, I found it veering towards boring at times, and unsuccessful at making her story more interesting to a wider audience.

    12. Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Heart by Claire Harman

      Excellent for learning details about Charlotte Brontë’s life (I had no idea she ever married!), although the writing style was dry and at times it was a bit tedious. Read it if you want to know more about Charlotte or her sisters, but it’s not a must-read as a generally-interesting biography.

    13. Kid Lit

    14. Winterbound by Margery Williams Bianco

      Enjoyable, old-fashioned story. I’m keeping an eye out for a copy to add to our library, because it’d be a good one to have on hand for the kids to read in the future.

    15. The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

      I would have loved this one as a kid. As an adult, I enjoyed it well enough, and I’ll read it to my kids soon(ish).

    16. The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill

      Has gotten tons of praise since publication, including winning the 2017 Newbery Medal. And I liked it, but I didn’t LOVE LOVE LOVE it like I somewhat expected to with the press it’s gotten.

    17. Savvy by Ingrid Law

      Fun, with an unusual take on magical powers. It’s the first in a trilogy, and eventually I’ll look for the others, although it’s not a immediate priority. I’ll keep this in mind for my kids to read when they get into middle-grade books.

    18. Cookbooks

    19. Sheet Pan Suppers: 120 Recipes for Simple, Surprising, Hands-Off Meals Straight from the Oven by Molly Gilbert

      So many tempting ideas in this one, especially a couple of the breakfast ideas as I daydream about our upcoming bookclub retreat!

    20. Nigella Fresh: Delicious Flavors on Your Plate All Year Round by Nigella Lawson

      Nothing jumped out at me that I wanted to try, but I adore Nigella’s voice, and love reading her commentary.

    21. Week in a Day by Rachael Ray

      It’s not what I thought it was going to be, and I still want to look at the cookbook I thought I was getting. For a cookbook where the focus is on prepping for five meals on one day, there was very little direction on the order for the meals to be prepped, or ways to make things easier on the cook. It felt very forced as far as making recipes fit into the supposed premise.

    22. The Farm Chicks in the Kitchen by Serena Thompson and Teri Edwards

      Grabbed on a whim from the library shelf, so the fact that I didn’t really like it all that much isn’t too disappointing. It included appetizers, lunch, desserts … but no dinner ideas! And really, dinner is where I want ideas. 🙂

    23. The Melendy Quartet

    24. The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright
    25. The Four-Story Mistake by Elizabeth Enright
    26. Then There Were Five by Elizabeth Enright
    27. Spiderweb for Two by Elizabeth Enright
    28. General thoughts about the entire series: I LOVED IT. How on earth did I never read these books as a child? I would have adored them, and wished I could be adopted into the family, and have their adventures. Great on audio as well. I can’t wait to read them to my kids, or at least introduce them to them, and then let them read all four themselves.

      Rereads

    29. The Hanging Valley by Peter Robinson

      The geography on this one confused me, and I got a little sidetracked by trying to understand what on earth Robinson was describing. Eventually I gave up and just enjoyed the characters. I’m still not entirely sure what happened at the very end, but it would be a major spoiler to explain so if you’ve read it recently and can discuss, let me know.

    30. Past Reason Hated by Peter Robinson

      So dated as far as social issues go, and the book itself drags quite a bit. Unless you’re obsessive about reading all the books in a series, this one is completely skippable.

    31. Cain His Brother by Anne Perry

      And another book where the middle drags on way too much. This should easily been edited down by at least 100 pages, to make for a more engaging book. The details get really repetitive. The solution to the mystery is also completely unbelievable.

    32. Not For Me

    33. Plague Land by S. D. Sykes

      I need at least one character to care about in a book, and this one didn’t have any. Despite wanting to like the book – I love the medieval time period, and the premise behind the book – a third son is recalled from the monastery he’s been sent to when his father and older brothers both die from the plague – was intriguing. Alas, the book itself was boring and filled with unpleasant characters. The mystery itself was even a let-down and didn’t make up for the disagreeable characters. .

    34. Work Clean: The Life-Changing Power of Mise-En-Place to Organize Your Life, Work and Mind by Dan Charnas

      Almost preachy in tone, and super repetitive. Would have been stronger as a long article or series of blog posts, but as a full-length book it felt padded.

    35. I’d Tell You I Love You But Then I’d Have to Kill You by Ally Carter

      Teetered on the edge between amusingly quirky and entertaining, and ridiculously absurd. Eventually toppled off into the absurd side for me. I think I’m too old and cranky to appreciate it.

    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

    New on Your Stack (volume 26)

    Some highlights from the books from last month’s linkup:


    Stacie (Sincerely Stacie) has a small stack this month, but it features one I immediately went searching for at my library: Surgeon’s Story. I *love* medical memoirs, so I was disappointed to find my library doesn’t have it. I’ll keep an eye out for it in the future though!


    Happily for my TBR list, Kate (Opinionated Book Lover) added nothing to my “want to read” list this month. Don’t be that impressed with my self-control though: it’s only because I’m intentionally avoiding beginning the Charlotte Holmes series by Brittany Cavallaro, until the last in the trilogy is published (next year hopefully). So despite her praise for book #1, A Study in Charlotte, and for tempting me this month with book #2, The Last of August, I’m resisting.


    Arwen (The Tech Chef) mentioned getting Queen of Extinction for joining the author’s email list. Just like Arwen, the teaser describing the book for those who like “fairytale retellings, magic, steampunk, and romance” got my attention. Ok, I’m not so much into romance, but 3 out of 4 work. The author’s website no longer offers this title, but I did sign up for her email list and instead received Rebel’s Honor, the first in a Steampunk Fantasy series.


    Jill (Days at Home) showcased a new-to-me title and series: The Road to Paradise by Karen Barnett. I love the cover, and I love the idea of the 1927 National Park setting. I’ve got it on hold from my library, and my fingers crossed that it lives up to the cover. 🙂


    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

    Audible’s Anniversary Sale: What To Get

    I’m getting bossy in this post, but today is the last day of Audible’s Daily Deal anniversary sale, and it’s such a good one I can’t resist.

    Below I’m highlighting 25 of the books that I think are most interesting from the sale, and telling you which ones I bought for myself. As much as I’d have loved to get more of them I had a $15 budget, and had to stick to that. I did end up with 6 books for that though, which is a great deal!

    Remember, the deals end at midnight pacific tonight, so if any of these sound appealing, don’t wait to grab them! Best of all, you do NOT need to be an Audible member to take advantage of this sale – it’s available to anyone (in the US).

    Fascinating Nonfiction

    Stuff MattersStuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World by Mark Miodownik, narrated by Michael Page.
    Why Get It?If you like little tidbits of info on various topics, this is full of it. Why do materials behave the way they do – what’s the history and science behind them? It’s written in a conversational tone, and is very understandable. $2.95

    The Gifts of ImperfectionThe Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are by Brené Brown, narrated by Lauren Fortgang
    Why Get It? I got it because she’s been on my “read soon” list and this seemed as good a place to begin as any. $1.95

    A Mind for NumbersA Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra) by Barbara Oakley, narrated by Grover Gardner
    Why Get It? I got it because it’s on learning how to learn – not just math and science, but really anything. . $2.95

    The Demon Under the MicroscopeThe Demon Under The Microscope: From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor’s Heroic Search for the World’s First Miracle Drug by Thomas Hager, narrated by Stephen Hoye
    Why Get It? I love when an author pulls together the varied threads tying together an aspect of history, and this sounds like that sort of work. This was one of the last ones I ended up cutting from my “to buy” list. $3.95

    Brain on FireBrain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan, narrated by Heather Henderson
    Why Get It? It was a fascinating memoir (see my review here) $2.95

    Working StiffWorking Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek and T. J. Mitchell, narrated by Tanya Eby
    Why Get It? I was interested in it because medical memoirs are a particular favorite of mine. If you’re not interested in that subgenre I don’t imagine this one sounds all that appealing to you. 😉 $3.95

    Find the GoodFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende
    Why Get It? Heart-warming (and occasionally heart-wrenching) essays (see my review here) $.99

    A Thousand Miles to FreedomA Thousand Miles to Freedom: My Escape from North Korea by Eunsun Kim with Sebastien Falletti, narrated by Emily Woo Zeller
    Why Get It? An incredible story, although I ultimately decided it sounded too emotionally difficult for me to listen to. $1.95

    Elephant CompanyElephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II by Vicki Constantine Croke, narrated by Simon Prebble
    Why Get It? Elephants + World War II. Just when I think I’ve read about all there is to find on World War II there’s another angle. Another one that was a late cut from my “buy” list. $3.95

    Great Fiction

    A Town Like AliceA Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute, narrated by Robin Bailey
    Why Get It? Great characters and an appealing story. See my review here. Skipped buying it only because I own it on Kindle already. $3.95

    The Last AnniversaryThe Last Anniversary by Liane Moriarty, narrated by Heather Wilds
    Why Get It? Liane Moriarty writes compelling novels, although I’ve never read this one. $3.95

    A Man Called OveA Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, narrated by George Newbern
    Why Get It? Glowing reviews and comments about it from some trusted friends have it as a “must get to this book” title for me. $3.95

    The Sign of FourThe Sign of Four by Arthur Conan Doyle, narrated by David Timson
    Why Get It? One of the first Sherlock Holmes books. I bought this one. $1.95

    Ordinary GraceOrdinary Grace by William Kent Krueger, narrated by Rich Orlow
    Why Get It? It won multiple awards, and trusted friends have given it glowing reviews. $3.95

    Strangers on a TrainStrangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith, narrated by Bronson Pinchot
    Why Get It? It’s Highsmith’s debut novel, and it doesn’t follow the famous Hitchcock movie exactly (or I should say, the movie doesn’t follow the book exactly). It’s classic noir/suspense. $3.95

    The Handmaid's TaleThe Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, narrated by Claire Danes
    Why Get It? It’s the classic novel in a new award-winning audio version. $3.95

    Lost LakeLost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen, narrated by Janet Metzger
    Why Get It? Character-driven novel with a touch of magic. $3.95

    The House at RivertonThe House at Riverton by Kate Morton, narrated by Caroline Lee
    Why Get It? It’s Kate Morton’s debut novel, and the narrator’s voice is wonderful. $5.95

    TimeboundTimebound by Rysa Walker, narrated by Kate Rudd
    Why Get It? Time travel. That’s pretty much enough of a reason for me. Well that and a friend recommended it specifically, and my library doesn’t have it so I need to buy it if I’m going to read it. So I did:) $3.95

    Lord John and the Private MatterLord John and the Private Matter by Diana Gabaldon, narrated by Jeff Woodman
    Why Get It? Speaking of time travel, if you’re a fan of Gabaldon’s Outlander books, this is the first in a spin-off series featuring one of the minor characters from that series. $3.95

    Juvenile Literature

    Pippi LongstockingPippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren, narrated by Christina Moore
    Why Get It? The classic children’s novel is a steal at only, and I couldn’t resist getting it. $.99

    Timeless Tales of Beatrix PotterTimeless Tales of Beatrix Potter: Peter Rabbit and Friends by Beatrix Potter, narrated by Katherine Kellgren
    Why Get It? More classic children’s stories. $1.95

    The Wonderful Wizard of OzWizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, narrated by Anne Hathaway
    Why Get It? Award-winning version of the famous book. $1.95

    The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, narrated by Michael Hordern
    Why Get It? It’s regularly listed as one of the greatest animal stories ever written, and as a must-read for families. I bought it for me, and also for my kids. $2.95

    Code Name VerityCode Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, narrated by Morven Christie
    Why Get It? This book was not a favorite of mine, but I am in the minority with that opinion – ratings are strong, and the issue I had with it was apparently not one shared by many. And the narrator is excellent; so good I seriously considered getting the book just to give it another try (especially after my positive experience rereading a book I’d originally disliked earlier this month). (See my review) $3.95

    So, if you’ve lost track, I bought The Gifts of Imperfection, A Mind for Numbers, Pippi Longstocking, The Wind in the Willows, The Sign of Four, and Timebound. Total price: $14.74, for 6 books. I’m quite pleased with that. 🙂

    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


    Previously on The Deliberate Reader

    One year ago: New on Your Stack (vol. 7)

    2017 Planning: How We’re Selecting Our Book Club Choices for 2017

    The last few weeks I’ve been obsessing over possible book club choices for next year.

    I think sometimes I like the planning almost as much as the actual reading – all that potential, and the wonderful possibilities that there are!

    Planning for Book Club Choices

    Step One: Begin with All The Books

    I started with the master list of book possibilities that we’ve kept for years (and a refresh about what books we’ve already read). Next we asked for suggestions from other members. Then I went digging through reference guides and book lists I’ve been compiling. I paid a visit to my own blog posts for fiction and nonfiction possibilities to refresh my memory as to books worth trying.

    Step Two: Show Some Restraint, and Reduce it to a Reasonable Level

    That’s when it became lots of fun for me. I started grouping possibilities into themed units, for voting purposes. Instead of having a list of 100 books, it becomes a more manageable list – here are a few classics; which one would you like to read? Here are a few historical fiction titles; which one do you like best?

    I ended up re-configuring the groupings multiple times, trying to keep things fairly balanced between the groups, with a nice mix of themes and types of books.

    One note of clarification: I still have the master list with all.the.books listed. We’ll look at that next year when it’s time to decide on books for 2018. Only if we decide that we are definitely NOT going to read a book does it get deleted off that list.

    Step Three: Collect the Votes!

    Ultimately I finished with 16 groups, with 3 or 4 choices in each group. Next up for me is to make the actual survey and send it out to the club members.

    As part of the survey, not only am I asking everyone to pick their favorite(s) from each grouping, I’m asking them to select which groups they actually want to read. We don’t want to pick a fantasy novel (even if everyone votes for the same one) if no one really wants to read a fantasy novel!

    Step Four: Make the Final Decisions

    Once the votes are in, we’ll look over them all and see what the members requested. And at that point we’ll start figuring out when the books best fit in our book club calendar!

    Next week (?) I plan to share the list of books I’m sending out to members for voting consideration. I’m excited about the possibilities and wish we could read all of them!


    Previously on The Deliberate Reader

    One year ago: Bookroo: A Bookish Subscription Service

    New on Your Stack (volume 14)

    Some highlights from the books you shared about in this month’s linkup:

    The Edge of LostKate (Mom’s Radius) highlights the new book The Edge of Lost which has *such* an intriguing cover. I’m not 100% sure that it’s one I want to read – it may be too much for me emotionally, but I’m sure tempted to give it a try.


    The NightingaleOne of these days I’m going to have to give Kristin Hannah’s book The Nightingale a try. When bloggers like Tanya (The Other Side of the Road) give it a 5 out of 5 rating, it makes me think I should probably have that day be sooner rather than later. Someday, I promise. 😉


    Surprised by OxfordTujia (Read Go Adventure) brought Carolyn Weber’s memoir Surprised by Oxford to my attention. Ok, not the memoir itself (it’s been lingering on my TBR list for ages), but the fact that it’s currently only $.99 for the Kindle version. Yes, I grabbed it. Perhaps now I’ll finally get the book read? Apparently it’s on sale for March, so if you haven’t read it, you’ve still got some time to get it at the discounted price.


    The Mystery of the Blue TrainCharlene (The Book Brew) has some great books in her post – she’s reminding me I need to read my next Agatha Christie (The Mystery of the Blue Train or The Body in the Library) as I slowly work my way through her works, and she’s got four interesting fantasy novels that have me considering them – Raymond Feist’s Darkwar Saga, Jennifer Laam’s The Secret Daughter of the Tsar, Félix J. Palma’s The Map of Time, and Alison Goodman’s Eon. Plus she’s reminded me that I think I do want to read Speaker for the Dead, the second in the Ender’s Game quartet, and see if I like it more. I feel like I owe it to Katie to give it a try after her thoughtful comments on my post about Ender’s Game.


    The Silver SuitcaseJill (Days at Home) did *not* add a lot to my TBR list this month (which is nice, when so many other people did), but oh, does she showcase some pretty book covers. The Silver Suitcase is lovely, and so is The Headmistress of Rosemere


    Only in NaplesAnd then Jessica (Quirky Bookworm) definitely *does* add books to my TBR, including Only in Naples which I immediately put on hold at the library (#1 on the holds list! Yes!) It’s a food memoir and travel memoir and of course I want to read it immediately. I’m also curious about the cookbook she’s reviewing this month – Dinner Made Simple – as I like the idea behind it in theory, and wonder how it is in reality.


    The Gratitude DiariesStacie (Sincerely Stacie) also immediately added a book to my reading list – I’m also on hold at the library for The Gratitude Diaries, and may even have received a copy of it by the time this post goes up (love borrowing ebooks – they just magically arrive on my device!) I’ve also requested the 4 x 4 Diet, as it sounds interesting.


    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

    New on the Stack in February 2016

    Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.

    Not a lot of new books for me in February – perhaps because I’m in a reading slump. I don’t generally list the kid lit I bring in, but am this month in part so my post doesn’t seem so skimpy. 🙂

    New on the Stack February 2016

    Nonfiction

    Teaching from RestTeaching from Rest: A Homeschooler’s Guide to Unshakable PeaceTeaching from Rest: A Homeschooler's Guide to Unshakable Peace by Sarah Mackenzie by Sarah Mackenzie

    How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library
    Why did I get it: I like her podcast, and have heard good things about the book.

    The Gospel Story BibleThe Gospel Story Bible: Discovering Jesus in the Old and New TestamentsThe Gospel Story Bible: Discovering Jesus in the Old and New Testaments by Marty Machowski by Marty Machowski

    How did I get it: Bought it.
    Why did I get it: We finished our last story Bible and I’ve had my eye on this one. So far I’d give it two thumbs up – it’s beautifully illustrated, I like its approach, and it’s written on a good level to fit my kids right now.

    The Story of the World Volume 1The Story of the World: Volume 1: Ancient Times: From the Earliest Nomads to the Last Roman Emperor, Revised EditionThe Story of the World: History for the Classical Child: Volume 1: Ancient Times: From the Earliest Nomads to the Last Roman Emperor, Revised Edition by Susan Wise Bauer (and Activity Book) by Susan Wise Bauer

    How did I get it: Bought them
    Why did I get it: Considering adding them in to our new homeschool curriculum, in large part because of the activity book. I am not good at adding in hands-on things and the activity book may make that easier for me. That’s the hope anyway and why I’m giving it a try.

    Fiction

    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone Jim Kay illustrationsHarry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone: The Illustrated EditionHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: The Illustrated Edition (Harry Potter, Book 1) by J. K. Rowling, illustrated by Jim Kay by J. K. Rowling, illustrated by Jim Kay

    How did I get it: Bought it as a Christmas present to myself, when Amazon had their 30% off one item sale. I *finally* got my copy last month but forgot to list it until this month. I’m glad it was only a present for myself because it definitely didn’t arrive by Christmas. 🙂
    Why did I get it: Harry Potter! And it’s gorgeous.

    Year of the Black PonyYear of the Black PonyYear of the Black Pony by Walt Morey by Walt Morey

    How did I get it: Bought it.
    Why did I get it: Found it on a nice sale and thought it was worth trying, since my library didn’t have it and reviews sounded promising.

    Little BritchesLittle Britches: Father and I Were RanchersLittle Britches: Father and I Were Ranchers by Ralph Moody by Ralph Moody

    How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
    Why did I get it: Have heard great things about it, and even when I was checking it out at the library I had someone notice it in my stack and comment about how much she loved it!

    When We Were Very YoungWhen We Were Very YoungWhen We Were Very Young by A. A. Milne by A. A. Milne

    How did I get it: Bought it.
    Why did I get it: I’m continuing to add more children’s poetry to our collection.

    Now We Are SixNow We Are SixNow We Are Six by A. A. Milne by A. A. Milne

    How did I get it: Bought it.
    Why did I get it: I’m continuing to add more children’s poetry to our collection.


    “New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

    1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

    2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

    The Deliberate Reader

    3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

    4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

    5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

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    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


    Previously on The Deliberate Reader

    One year ago: New on the Stack in January 2015
    Two years ago: 2013 Reads, Charts and Graphs Style

    New on Your Stack (volume 13)

    Some highlights from the books you shared about in this month’s linkup:

    Stars AboveKate (Mom’s Radius) will be reading Marissa Meyer’s Stars Above: A Lunar Chronicles Collection. I will also be reading Stars Above, as soon as my turn arrives at the library. Well, I suppose it’s possibly I’ll hear dreadful things about the book and rethink that plan, but they would have to be devastatingly bad reviews, and even then I’ll probably try it myself at least a bit. I do love this series. 🙂


    11 22 63Tanya (The Other Side of the Road) has some great books in her February stack. Jen Hatmaker’s For the Love and Kate Morton’s The Lake House are both so good, and I’ve heard nothing but wonderful things about Steven King’s 11/22/6311/22/63: A Novel. I’m only hesitating on reading it because of the length.


    Find the GoodStacie (Sincerely Stacie) always has an interesting mix of books, and I’m most intrigued by Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary WriterFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende. It sounds like the sort of nonfiction I always enjoy, so I’m looking forward to hearing what she thinks of it and if it’s worth seeking out.


    Food a Love StoryEllen (Bookspired) is reading Big Little Lies this month. I’ll be reading that later this year with my Facebook book club. She’s also reading Food: A Love StoryFood: A Love Story by Jim Gaffigan and I’ve heard so many people rave about this title that I need to give it a try soon.


    Stars Over Sunset BoulevardJill (Days at Home) has several books I’ve never heard of on her list – and with some really compelling covers I need to look into them and see if they’re right for me. Stars Over Sunset BoulevardStars Over Sunset Boulevard and The Feathered BoneThe Feathered Bone are the ones that most catch my eye and have me seeing if my library has them.


    RebeccaJessica (Quirky Bookworm) is listening to Rebecca, which reminds me that my in-person book club is reading RebeccaRebecca for March. I have read exactly zero pages in Rebecca, and our meeting is March 10. Perhaps it’s time for me to get started on it? 🙂

    Also, she’s reading The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English LanguageThe Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language which I’ve had on my Kindle for ages and have read zero pages of it, for no good reason other than I’ve got way too many books on my Kindle. I need reading deadlines sometimes to get to my books, and when they’re not library books they tend to get ignored. 🙁

    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


    Previously on The Deliberate Reader

    One year ago: What the Kids are Reading (in February 2015)
    Two years ago: Book Review: Cress by Marissa Meyer
    Three years ago: Book Review: Refuse to Choose by Barbara Sher

    New on the Stack in January 2016

    Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

    Nonfiction

    The Black CountThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss

    How did I get it: Bought a paperback copy from Amazon, and borrowed an electronic version from the library. Making it easy on myself to get it read!
    Why did I get it: It’s my book club pick for February!

    The Power of OneThe Power of One by Jenny Herman

    How did I get it: Grabbed a Kindle copy when it was on special offer.
    Why did I get it: I follow the author on social media and like her posts, so wanted to read her ebook.

    Fiction

    The ChosenThe ChosenThe Chosen by Chaim Potok by Chaim Potok

    How did I get it: Bought a paperback copy from Amazon
    Why did I get it: It’s my book club’s pick for March. Wanting to not cut things as close next month as I did this month!

    Julie of the WolvesJulie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George

    How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
    Why did I get it: It’s this month’s book for RTFEBC.

    A Single ShardA Single ShardA Single Shard by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

    How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
    Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.

    The Kite FightersThe Kite FightersThe Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

    How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
    Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.

    When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

    How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
    Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.


    “New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

    1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

    2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

    The Deliberate Reader

    3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

    4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

    5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

     Loading InLinkz ...

    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


    Previously on The Deliberate Reader

    One year ago: New on the Stack in January 2015
    Two years ago: 2013 Reads, Charts and Graphs Style

    New on Your Stack (volume 12)

    Everything I Never Told YouKate (Mom’s Radius) is going to be reading Everything I Never Told YouEverything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng, which I borrowed from the library last year and then returned, unopened, after deciding that I wasn’t emotionally up for what I was afraid it might be.

    I realize that I may be missing out on a fantastic book because of that decision. I may reconsider it in the future, or if someone tells me the book isn’t emotionally wrenching.


    The Black CountJill (Days at Home) had quite the stack of new books, but I was most excited to see The Black CountThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss! I’m hoping that means she’s going to be joining us in the book club for the discussion on it next month. 🙂


    The Book of Job JournalMelinda (This Boy Mom) has some *great* books listed – I love reading the Bible chronologically, and she’s got me curious about The Book of Job JournalThe Book of Job Journal: One Chapter a Day by Courtney Joseph she’ll be using for study in January. Add in her other books and it looks like a nice month for her.


    The Lost City of ZTanya (The Other Side of the Road) lists some of the books that will be released as movies in 2016. Realistically, I’ll probably see none of them. But I have been meaning to read The Lost City of ZThe Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann for years. Seriously, it’s been on my Kindle for years. Why have I not gotten to it?


    Red QueenJessica (Quirky Bookworm) gives her January reading plan, and she has the oh-so-intruguing Red QueenRed Queen by Victoria Aveyard on her list. I’m trying to hold strong, and not start that series until the final book is at least closer to being released. And with a current expected publication date of 2018 for book #4, I’m going to have to resist quite a bit longer.

    But that cover! It’s calling to me! (Wait, I think I’ve said this before.) If I keep seeing this cover I may not be able to hold out on reading the book.

    Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


    Previously on The Deliberate Reader

    One year ago: Book Review: The 13 Clocks by James Thurber
    Two years ago: Book Review: Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie
    Three years ago: Book Review: How to Eat a Small Country by Amy Finley