Audible’s Anniversary Sale: What To Get

I’m getting bossy in this post, but today is the last day of Audible’s Daily Deal anniversary sale, and it’s such a good one I can’t resist.

Below I’m highlighting 25 of the books that I think are most interesting from the sale, and telling you which ones I bought for myself. As much as I’d have loved to get more of them I had a $15 budget, and had to stick to that. I did end up with 6 books for that though, which is a great deal!

Remember, the deals end at midnight pacific tonight, so if any of these sound appealing, don’t wait to grab them! Best of all, you do NOT need to be an Audible member to take advantage of this sale – it’s available to anyone (in the US).

Fascinating Nonfiction

Stuff MattersStuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World by Mark Miodownik, narrated by Michael Page.
Why Get It?If you like little tidbits of info on various topics, this is full of it. Why do materials behave the way they do – what’s the history and science behind them? It’s written in a conversational tone, and is very understandable. $2.95

The Gifts of ImperfectionThe Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are by Brené Brown, narrated by Lauren Fortgang
Why Get It? I got it because she’s been on my “read soon” list and this seemed as good a place to begin as any. $1.95

A Mind for NumbersA Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra) by Barbara Oakley, narrated by Grover Gardner
Why Get It? I got it because it’s on learning how to learn – not just math and science, but really anything. . $2.95

The Demon Under the MicroscopeThe Demon Under The Microscope: From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor’s Heroic Search for the World’s First Miracle Drug by Thomas Hager, narrated by Stephen Hoye
Why Get It? I love when an author pulls together the varied threads tying together an aspect of history, and this sounds like that sort of work. This was one of the last ones I ended up cutting from my “to buy” list. $3.95

Brain on FireBrain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan, narrated by Heather Henderson
Why Get It? It was a fascinating memoir (see my review here) $2.95

Working StiffWorking Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek and T. J. Mitchell, narrated by Tanya Eby
Why Get It? I was interested in it because medical memoirs are a particular favorite of mine. If you’re not interested in that subgenre I don’t imagine this one sounds all that appealing to you. 😉 $3.95

Find the GoodFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons From a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende
Why Get It? Heart-warming (and occasionally heart-wrenching) essays (see my review here) $.99

A Thousand Miles to FreedomA Thousand Miles to Freedom: My Escape from North Korea by Eunsun Kim with Sebastien Falletti, narrated by Emily Woo Zeller
Why Get It? An incredible story, although I ultimately decided it sounded too emotionally difficult for me to listen to. $1.95

Elephant CompanyElephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II by Vicki Constantine Croke, narrated by Simon Prebble
Why Get It? Elephants + World War II. Just when I think I’ve read about all there is to find on World War II there’s another angle. Another one that was a late cut from my “buy” list. $3.95

Great Fiction

A Town Like AliceA Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute, narrated by Robin Bailey
Why Get It? Great characters and an appealing story. See my review here. Skipped buying it only because I own it on Kindle already. $3.95

The Last AnniversaryThe Last Anniversary by Liane Moriarty, narrated by Heather Wilds
Why Get It? Liane Moriarty writes compelling novels, although I’ve never read this one. $3.95

A Man Called OveA Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, narrated by George Newbern
Why Get It? Glowing reviews and comments about it from some trusted friends have it as a “must get to this book” title for me. $3.95

The Sign of FourThe Sign of Four by Arthur Conan Doyle, narrated by David Timson
Why Get It? One of the first Sherlock Holmes books. I bought this one. $1.95

Ordinary GraceOrdinary Grace by William Kent Krueger, narrated by Rich Orlow
Why Get It? It won multiple awards, and trusted friends have given it glowing reviews. $3.95

Strangers on a TrainStrangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith, narrated by Bronson Pinchot
Why Get It? It’s Highsmith’s debut novel, and it doesn’t follow the famous Hitchcock movie exactly (or I should say, the movie doesn’t follow the book exactly). It’s classic noir/suspense. $3.95

The Handmaid's TaleThe Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, narrated by Claire Danes
Why Get It? It’s the classic novel in a new award-winning audio version. $3.95

Lost LakeLost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen, narrated by Janet Metzger
Why Get It? Character-driven novel with a touch of magic. $3.95

The House at RivertonThe House at Riverton by Kate Morton, narrated by Caroline Lee
Why Get It? It’s Kate Morton’s debut novel, and the narrator’s voice is wonderful. $5.95

TimeboundTimebound by Rysa Walker, narrated by Kate Rudd
Why Get It? Time travel. That’s pretty much enough of a reason for me. Well that and a friend recommended it specifically, and my library doesn’t have it so I need to buy it if I’m going to read it. So I did:) $3.95

Lord John and the Private MatterLord John and the Private Matter by Diana Gabaldon, narrated by Jeff Woodman
Why Get It? Speaking of time travel, if you’re a fan of Gabaldon’s Outlander books, this is the first in a spin-off series featuring one of the minor characters from that series. $3.95

Juvenile Literature

Pippi LongstockingPippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren, narrated by Christina Moore
Why Get It? The classic children’s novel is a steal at only, and I couldn’t resist getting it. $.99

Timeless Tales of Beatrix PotterTimeless Tales of Beatrix Potter: Peter Rabbit and Friends by Beatrix Potter, narrated by Katherine Kellgren
Why Get It? More classic children’s stories. $1.95

The Wonderful Wizard of OzWizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, narrated by Anne Hathaway
Why Get It? Award-winning version of the famous book. $1.95

The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, narrated by Michael Hordern
Why Get It? It’s regularly listed as one of the greatest animal stories ever written, and as a must-read for families. I bought it for me, and also for my kids. $2.95

Code Name VerityCode Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, narrated by Morven Christie
Why Get It? This book was not a favorite of mine, but I am in the minority with that opinion – ratings are strong, and the issue I had with it was apparently not one shared by many. And the narrator is excellent; so good I seriously considered getting the book just to give it another try (especially after my positive experience rereading a book I’d originally disliked earlier this month). (See my review) $3.95

So, if you’ve lost track, I bought The Gifts of Imperfection, A Mind for Numbers, Pippi Longstocking, The Wind in the Willows, The Sign of Four, and Timebound. Total price: $14.74, for 6 books. I’m quite pleased with that. 🙂

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: New on Your Stack (vol. 7)

2017 Planning: How We’re Selecting Our Book Club Choices for 2017

The last few weeks I’ve been obsessing over possible book club choices for next year.

I think sometimes I like the planning almost as much as the actual reading – all that potential, and the wonderful possibilities that there are!

Planning for Book Club Choices

Step One: Begin with All The Books

I started with the master list of book possibilities that we’ve kept for years (and a refresh about what books we’ve already read). Next we asked for suggestions from other members. Then I went digging through reference guides and book lists I’ve been compiling. I paid a visit to my own blog posts for fiction and nonfiction possibilities to refresh my memory as to books worth trying.

Step Two: Show Some Restraint, and Reduce it to a Reasonable Level

That’s when it became lots of fun for me. I started grouping possibilities into themed units, for voting purposes. Instead of having a list of 100 books, it becomes a more manageable list – here are a few classics; which one would you like to read? Here are a few historical fiction titles; which one do you like best?

I ended up re-configuring the groupings multiple times, trying to keep things fairly balanced between the groups, with a nice mix of themes and types of books.

One note of clarification: I still have the master list with all.the.books listed. We’ll look at that next year when it’s time to decide on books for 2018. Only if we decide that we are definitely NOT going to read a book does it get deleted off that list.

Step Three: Collect the Votes!

Ultimately I finished with 16 groups, with 3 or 4 choices in each group. Next up for me is to make the actual survey and send it out to the club members.

As part of the survey, not only am I asking everyone to pick their favorite(s) from each grouping, I’m asking them to select which groups they actually want to read. We don’t want to pick a fantasy novel (even if everyone votes for the same one) if no one really wants to read a fantasy novel!

Step Four: Make the Final Decisions

Once the votes are in, we’ll look over them all and see what the members requested. And at that point we’ll start figuring out when the books best fit in our book club calendar!

Next week (?) I plan to share the list of books I’m sending out to members for voting consideration. I’m excited about the possibilities and wish we could read all of them!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Bookroo: A Bookish Subscription Service

New on Your Stack (volume 14)

Some highlights from the books you shared about in this month’s linkup:

The Edge of LostKate (Mom’s Radius) highlights the new book The Edge of Lost which has *such* an intriguing cover. I’m not 100% sure that it’s one I want to read – it may be too much for me emotionally, but I’m sure tempted to give it a try.


The NightingaleOne of these days I’m going to have to give Kristin Hannah’s book The Nightingale a try. When bloggers like Tanya (The Other Side of the Road) give it a 5 out of 5 rating, it makes me think I should probably have that day be sooner rather than later. Someday, I promise. 😉


Surprised by OxfordTujia (Read Go Adventure) brought Carolyn Weber’s memoir Surprised by Oxford to my attention. Ok, not the memoir itself (it’s been lingering on my TBR list for ages), but the fact that it’s currently only $.99 for the Kindle version. Yes, I grabbed it. Perhaps now I’ll finally get the book read? Apparently it’s on sale for March, so if you haven’t read it, you’ve still got some time to get it at the discounted price.


The Mystery of the Blue TrainCharlene (The Book Brew) has some great books in her post – she’s reminding me I need to read my next Agatha Christie (The Mystery of the Blue Train or The Body in the Library) as I slowly work my way through her works, and she’s got four interesting fantasy novels that have me considering them – Raymond Feist’s Darkwar Saga, Jennifer Laam’s The Secret Daughter of the Tsar, Félix J. Palma’s The Map of Time, and Alison Goodman’s Eon. Plus she’s reminded me that I think I do want to read Speaker for the Dead, the second in the Ender’s Game quartet, and see if I like it more. I feel like I owe it to Katie to give it a try after her thoughtful comments on my post about Ender’s Game.


The Silver SuitcaseJill (Days at Home) did *not* add a lot to my TBR list this month (which is nice, when so many other people did), but oh, does she showcase some pretty book covers. The Silver Suitcase is lovely, and so is The Headmistress of Rosemere


Only in NaplesAnd then Jessica (Quirky Bookworm) definitely *does* add books to my TBR, including Only in Naples which I immediately put on hold at the library (#1 on the holds list! Yes!) It’s a food memoir and travel memoir and of course I want to read it immediately. I’m also curious about the cookbook she’s reviewing this month – Dinner Made Simple – as I like the idea behind it in theory, and wonder how it is in reality.


The Gratitude DiariesStacie (Sincerely Stacie) also immediately added a book to my reading list – I’m also on hold at the library for The Gratitude Diaries, and may even have received a copy of it by the time this post goes up (love borrowing ebooks – they just magically arrive on my device!) I’ve also requested the 4 x 4 Diet, as it sounds interesting.


Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on the Stack in February 2016

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.

Not a lot of new books for me in February – perhaps because I’m in a reading slump. I don’t generally list the kid lit I bring in, but am this month in part so my post doesn’t seem so skimpy. 🙂

New on the Stack February 2016

Nonfiction

Teaching from RestTeaching from Rest: A Homeschooler’s Guide to Unshakable PeaceTeaching from Rest: A Homeschooler's Guide to Unshakable Peace by Sarah Mackenzie by Sarah Mackenzie

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library
Why did I get it: I like her podcast, and have heard good things about the book.

The Gospel Story BibleThe Gospel Story Bible: Discovering Jesus in the Old and New TestamentsThe Gospel Story Bible: Discovering Jesus in the Old and New Testaments by Marty Machowski by Marty Machowski

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: We finished our last story Bible and I’ve had my eye on this one. So far I’d give it two thumbs up – it’s beautifully illustrated, I like its approach, and it’s written on a good level to fit my kids right now.

The Story of the World Volume 1The Story of the World: Volume 1: Ancient Times: From the Earliest Nomads to the Last Roman Emperor, Revised EditionThe Story of the World: History for the Classical Child: Volume 1: Ancient Times: From the Earliest Nomads to the Last Roman Emperor, Revised Edition by Susan Wise Bauer (and Activity Book) by Susan Wise Bauer

How did I get it: Bought them
Why did I get it: Considering adding them in to our new homeschool curriculum, in large part because of the activity book. I am not good at adding in hands-on things and the activity book may make that easier for me. That’s the hope anyway and why I’m giving it a try.

Fiction

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone Jim Kay illustrationsHarry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone: The Illustrated EditionHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: The Illustrated Edition (Harry Potter, Book 1) by J. K. Rowling, illustrated by Jim Kay by J. K. Rowling, illustrated by Jim Kay

How did I get it: Bought it as a Christmas present to myself, when Amazon had their 30% off one item sale. I *finally* got my copy last month but forgot to list it until this month. I’m glad it was only a present for myself because it definitely didn’t arrive by Christmas. 🙂
Why did I get it: Harry Potter! And it’s gorgeous.

Year of the Black PonyYear of the Black PonyYear of the Black Pony by Walt Morey by Walt Morey

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: Found it on a nice sale and thought it was worth trying, since my library didn’t have it and reviews sounded promising.

Little BritchesLittle Britches: Father and I Were RanchersLittle Britches: Father and I Were Ranchers by Ralph Moody by Ralph Moody

How did I get it: Borrowed it from the library.
Why did I get it: Have heard great things about it, and even when I was checking it out at the library I had someone notice it in my stack and comment about how much she loved it!

When We Were Very YoungWhen We Were Very YoungWhen We Were Very Young by A. A. Milne by A. A. Milne

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: I’m continuing to add more children’s poetry to our collection.

Now We Are SixNow We Are SixNow We Are Six by A. A. Milne by A. A. Milne

How did I get it: Bought it.
Why did I get it: I’m continuing to add more children’s poetry to our collection.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

 Loading InLinkz ...

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: New on the Stack in January 2015
Two years ago: 2013 Reads, Charts and Graphs Style

New on Your Stack (volume 13)

Some highlights from the books you shared about in this month’s linkup:

Stars AboveKate (Mom’s Radius) will be reading Marissa Meyer’s Stars Above: A Lunar Chronicles Collection. I will also be reading Stars Above, as soon as my turn arrives at the library. Well, I suppose it’s possibly I’ll hear dreadful things about the book and rethink that plan, but they would have to be devastatingly bad reviews, and even then I’ll probably try it myself at least a bit. I do love this series. 🙂


11 22 63Tanya (The Other Side of the Road) has some great books in her February stack. Jen Hatmaker’s For the Love and Kate Morton’s The Lake House are both so good, and I’ve heard nothing but wonderful things about Steven King’s 11/22/6311/22/63: A Novel. I’m only hesitating on reading it because of the length.


Find the GoodStacie (Sincerely Stacie) always has an interesting mix of books, and I’m most intrigued by Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary WriterFind the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-Town Obituary Writer by Heather Lende. It sounds like the sort of nonfiction I always enjoy, so I’m looking forward to hearing what she thinks of it and if it’s worth seeking out.


Food a Love StoryEllen (Bookspired) is reading Big Little Lies this month. I’ll be reading that later this year with my Facebook book club. She’s also reading Food: A Love StoryFood: A Love Story by Jim Gaffigan and I’ve heard so many people rave about this title that I need to give it a try soon.


Stars Over Sunset BoulevardJill (Days at Home) has several books I’ve never heard of on her list – and with some really compelling covers I need to look into them and see if they’re right for me. Stars Over Sunset BoulevardStars Over Sunset Boulevard and The Feathered BoneThe Feathered Bone are the ones that most catch my eye and have me seeing if my library has them.


RebeccaJessica (Quirky Bookworm) is listening to Rebecca, which reminds me that my in-person book club is reading RebeccaRebecca for March. I have read exactly zero pages in Rebecca, and our meeting is March 10. Perhaps it’s time for me to get started on it? 🙂

Also, she’s reading The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English LanguageThe Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language which I’ve had on my Kindle for ages and have read zero pages of it, for no good reason other than I’ve got way too many books on my Kindle. I need reading deadlines sometimes to get to my books, and when they’re not library books they tend to get ignored. 🙁

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: What the Kids are Reading (in February 2015)
Two years ago: Book Review: Cress by Marissa Meyer
Three years ago: Book Review: Refuse to Choose by Barbara Sher

New on the Stack in January 2016

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

Nonfiction

The Black CountThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss

How did I get it: Bought a paperback copy from Amazon, and borrowed an electronic version from the library. Making it easy on myself to get it read!
Why did I get it: It’s my book club pick for February!

The Power of OneThe Power of One by Jenny Herman

How did I get it: Grabbed a Kindle copy when it was on special offer.
Why did I get it: I follow the author on social media and like her posts, so wanted to read her ebook.

Fiction

The ChosenThe ChosenThe Chosen by Chaim Potok by Chaim Potok

How did I get it: Bought a paperback copy from Amazon
Why did I get it: It’s my book club’s pick for March. Wanting to not cut things as close next month as I did this month!

Julie of the WolvesJulie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s this month’s book for RTFEBC.

A Single ShardA Single ShardA Single Shard by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.

The Kite FightersThe Kite FightersThe Kite Fighters by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.

When My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was KeokoWhen My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park by Linda Sue Park

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Pre-reading Korea books.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

 Loading InLinkz ...

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: New on the Stack in January 2015
Two years ago: 2013 Reads, Charts and Graphs Style

New on Your Stack (volume 12)

Everything I Never Told YouKate (Mom’s Radius) is going to be reading Everything I Never Told YouEverything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng, which I borrowed from the library last year and then returned, unopened, after deciding that I wasn’t emotionally up for what I was afraid it might be.

I realize that I may be missing out on a fantastic book because of that decision. I may reconsider it in the future, or if someone tells me the book isn’t emotionally wrenching.


The Black CountJill (Days at Home) had quite the stack of new books, but I was most excited to see The Black CountThe Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss! I’m hoping that means she’s going to be joining us in the book club for the discussion on it next month. 🙂


The Book of Job JournalMelinda (This Boy Mom) has some *great* books listed – I love reading the Bible chronologically, and she’s got me curious about The Book of Job JournalThe Book of Job Journal: One Chapter a Day by Courtney Joseph she’ll be using for study in January. Add in her other books and it looks like a nice month for her.


The Lost City of ZTanya (The Other Side of the Road) lists some of the books that will be released as movies in 2016. Realistically, I’ll probably see none of them. But I have been meaning to read The Lost City of ZThe Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann for years. Seriously, it’s been on my Kindle for years. Why have I not gotten to it?


Red QueenJessica (Quirky Bookworm) gives her January reading plan, and she has the oh-so-intruguing Red QueenRed Queen by Victoria Aveyard on her list. I’m trying to hold strong, and not start that series until the final book is at least closer to being released. And with a current expected publication date of 2018 for book #4, I’m going to have to resist quite a bit longer.

But that cover! It’s calling to me! (Wait, I think I’ve said this before.) If I keep seeing this cover I may not be able to hold out on reading the book.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: The 13 Clocks by James Thurber
Two years ago: Book Review: Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie
Three years ago: Book Review: How to Eat a Small Country by Amy Finley

New on the Stack in December 2015

Kind of a lot of new books for me this month, and (for me) a lot of purchases instead of just library books. Christmas you know, and yes, I do buy books for myself. 🙂

Welcome to New on the Stack, where you can share the latest books you’ve added to your reading pile. I’d love for you to join us and add a link to your own post or instagram picture sharing your books! It’s a fun way to see what others will soon be reading, and get even more ideas of books to add to my “I want to read that!” list.New on the Stack button

December 2015 New on the StackNew on the Stack in December 2015

Nonfiction

84 Charing Cross Road84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff

How did I get it: Bought it from Amazon as an early Christmas present to myself. 😉
Why did I get it: It’s one of my favorite books ever, and I didn’t own it. Plus it was book club’s pick for December.

The Boys in the BoatThe Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown

How did I get it: Bought it from Amazon as an early Christmas present to myself. 😉
Why did I get it: I love this book, and it’s February’s in-person book club pick.

The Circus FireThe Circus Fire: A True Story of an American Tragedy by Stewart O’Nan

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I read a book on the topic as a child, and I’m curious to see if what I recall about it is in any way accurate.

Born RoundBorn Round: A Story of Family, Food and a Ferocious Appetite by Frank Bruni

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s been on my TBR list, and it satisfied the last criteria I needed for the Book Riot 2015 Read Harder Challenge.

Fiction

RebeccaRebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

How did I get it: Bought it from Amazon as an early Christmas present to myself. 😉
Why did I get it: It’s my in-person book club’s March selection.

The HobbitThe Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

How did I get it: Bought it from Amazon as an early Christmas present to myself. 😉
Why did I get it: I needed a purchase to reach the level for one-day shipping and this was the right amount. Plus it’s December’s pick for the blog’s book club, so I do need to read it later.

A Town Like AliceA Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute

How did I get it: Purchased a Kindle copy.
Why did I get it: It was only $2.99, and it’s my in-person book club’s April read.

The Secret Diary of Lizzie BennetThe Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet: A NovelThe Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet: A Novel (Lizzie Bennet Diaries) by Bernie Su and Kate Rorick by Bernie Su and Kate Rorick

How did I get it: Purchased a Kindle copy.
Why did I get it: It was on special for $1.99, and I wanted to try it.

The Girl Who Wrote in SilkThe Girl Who Wrote in Silk by Kelli Estes

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Heard raves about it.

The Dead in Their Vaulted ArchesThe Dead in their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley

How did I get it: Borrowed the audio version electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s Flavia!

Among the MadAmong the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: It’s Maisie Dobbs!

Mr. Churchill's SecretaryMr. Churchill’s Secretary by Susan Elia MacNeal

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: Moira convinced me to try it.

When We WakeWhen We Wake by Karen Healey

How did I get it: Borrowed it electronically from the library.
Why did I get it: I’m looking for a great, discussable teen novel set in Australia. This is one of the ones I’m trying.


“New on the Stack” Link-up Guidelines:

1. Share your posts or instagram pictures about the new-to-you books you added to your reading stack last month. They can be purchases, library books, ebooks, whatever it is you’ll be reading! Entries completely unrelated to this theme or linked to your homepage may be deleted.

2. Link back to this post – you can use the button below if you’d like, or just use a text link.

The Deliberate Reader

3. The linkup will be open until the end of the month.

4. Please visit the person’s blog or Instagram who linked up directly before you and leave them a comment.

5. By linking up, you’re granting me permission to use and/or repost photographs from your linked post or Instagram. (Because on social media or in next month’s post, I hope to feature some of the books that catch my attention from this month.)

 Loading InLinkz ...

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!


Previously on The Deliberate Reader

Two years ago: December Recap
Three years ago: Book Review: Faith Girlz! Whatever

2015 Reading Challenges: The Results

The year is all but over, so it’s time to check in and see how I did on my reading challenges. The only one I “officially” planned on doing is Modern Mrs. Darcy’s, but halfway through the year I decided to see how close I could get to completing Book Riot’s challenge.

Like the idea of a reading challenge? Modern Mrs. Darcy just announced hers for 2016, and Book Riot is also having one again. There’s also Tim Challies’ reading challenge, which is tiered to match your reading ambitions – anywhere from 13 to 104 books. I’m considering posting about how the books from my book club can help you fit these challenges. 🙂 Happy reading!

2015 MMD Reading Challenge Completed

Modern Mrs Darcy’s 2015 Reading Challenge

I completed this one fairly easily – the categories were pretty broad. It was fun to think about it though!

  1. a book you’ve been meaning to readPride & Prejudice by Jane Austen
  2. a book published this yearThe Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows
  3. a book in a genre you don’t typically readConspiracy 365: January by Gabrielle Lord
  4. a book from your childhoodThe Princess BrideThe Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman by William Goldman
  5. a book your mom loves84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
  6. a book that was originally written in a different languageHeidi by Johanna Spyri
  7. a book “everyone” has read but youSeabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand
  8. a book you choose because of the coverSeraphina by Rachel Hartman
  9. a book by a favorite authorCold Tangerines by Shauna Niequist
  10. a book recommended by someone with great tasteRules of Civility by Amor Towles
  11. a book you should have read in high schoolEnder’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  12. a book currently on the bestseller listAs You Wish by Cary Elwes

Book Riot’s 2015 Read Harder Challenge

  1. A book written by someone when they were under the age of 25My Father’s DragonMy Father's Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett by Ruth Stiles Gannett (who was 25 when this was published, so I’m assuming it was written when she was under 25.)
  2. A book written by someone when they were over the age of 65National Geographic Kids Animal Stories coauthored by Jane Yolen
  3. A collection of short storiesThe Thirteen Problem by Agatha Christie
  4. A book published by an indie press – Not entirely sure this counts, but The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz is published by Candlewick Press, which technically is an independent publisher, although it may be bigger than what Book Riot had in mind for this. But they’re not part of one of the big publishing conglomerates.
  5. A book by someone that identifies as LGBTQBorn Round by Frank Bruni (finished on the 29th of December, just in time to qualify for this challenge, as it was the last one I needed a book to fill.)
  6. A book by a person whose gender is different from your ownI Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley
  7. A book that takes place in Asia -I’ve got the nonfiction The Lady and the Panda, which mostly takes place in China, and the YA title Listen, Slowly, which is set in Vietnam.
  8. A book by an author from Africa – I read the children’s book Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke, who is originally from Nigeria.
  9. A book that is by or about someone from an indigenous culture – I reread the children’s book The Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill, set in an Athabascan village in remote Alaska.
  10. A microhistoryGhost Map by Steven Johnson (maybe stretching the definition of microhistory here)
  11. A YA novel – so many to choose from here so I’ll just list the last one I read – Winter by Marissa Meyer.
  12. A sci-fi novelEnder’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  13. A romance novelEnchanted, Inc.Enchanted, Inc. (Katie Chandler, Book 1) by Shanna Swendson by Shanna Swendson
  14. A NBA, MBP or Pulitzer Prize winner – Not technically a winner, but I’m still going to count Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin, which was a finalist in 2014.
  15. A book that is a retelling of a classic storyBook of a Thousand Days by Shannon Hale
  16. An audiobookAs You Wish by Cary Elwes. Although I didn’t listen to it 100%.
  17. A collection of poetry – if kids’ poetry counts, I’ve read Eric Carle’s Animals AnimalsEric Carle's Animals Animals
  18. A book that someone else has recommended to youThe Best Yes: Making Wise Decisions in the Midst of Endless DemandsThe Best Yes: Making Wise Decisions in the Midst of Endless Demands by Lysa TerKeurst by Lysa TerKeurst
  19. A book that was originally published in another languageThe Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
  20. A graphic novel or a graphic memoir – Does a kids’ graphic novel count? I read A Journey through the Digestive System with Max Axiom, Super ScientistA Journey through the Digestive System with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science) and The Surprising World of Bacteria with Max Axiom, Super ScientistThe Surprising World of Bacteria with Max Axiom, Super Scientist (Graphic Science)
  21. A book that you would consider a guilty pleasureWinter by Marissa Meyer. Love love love that series.
  22. A book published before 1850The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas would both work.
  23. A book published this year – lots to choose from here, including My Kitchen Year by Ruth Reichl.
  24. A self-improvement bookBetter Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

24 of 24, thanks to me counting children’s books when necessary and taking an award finalist instead of winner. Eh, close enough for me. 😉

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!

New on Your Stack (volume 11)

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend paperbackKate (Mom’s Radius) is going to be reading The Readers of Broken Wheel RecommendThe Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald by Katarina Bivald, and it’s on my TBR stack already too, thanks to receiving a review copy. Since the paperback version releases in January I really need to get the book read! I’ve had it for ages, but it’s been pushed back for higher priority titles, but it’s now become one of the highest priorities I have!


Welcome to the SymphonyStacie (Sincerely Stacie) has several books that are already on my radar, but I hadn’t heard of Welcome to the SymphonyWelcome to the Symphony: A Musical Exploration of the Orchestra Using Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 by Carolyn Sloan, illustrated by James Williamson, and now I *really* want it for my kids. This may have just become the first item on the birthday list for my youngest. If I’d noticed it on Stacie’s post before Christmas I’d have probably already gotten it for her. 🙂


Mrs. Roosevelt's ConfidanteMoira (Hearth and Homefront) reminds me to keep The Lightning ThiefThe Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Book 1) by Rick Riordan and the rest of the Percy Jackson series in mind for my oldest – I *think* he’s probably just a bit too young for it still, but maybe not. And even if he is right now, I don’t think it’ll be all that long before he’s ready to give them a try.

She also has me wanting to try Susan Elia MacNeal’s Maggie Hope mystery series, which grabbed me because of the gorgeous cover on the one she’s reading this month (Mrs. Roosevelt’s ConfidanteMrs. Roosevelt's Confidante: A Maggie Hope Mystery by Susan Elia MacNeal). I have to start with the first, Mr. Churchill’s SecretaryMr. Churchill's Secretary: A Maggie Hope Mystery by Susan Elia MacNeal, and see why Moira says it’s her favorite mystery series right now. 🙂

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting The Deliberate Reader!