What the Kids are Reading (in October and November 2015)

Lots of books to share about this month, especially since I missed last month with my book club series.

A Sick Day for Amos McGeeA Sick Day for Amos McGeeA Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
I’ve seen this listed so many places as a recommended picture book, and I enthusiastically agree –
it’s wonderful!

Orange Pear Apple BearOrange Pear Apple BearOrange Pear Apple Bear by Emily Gravett by Emily Gravett
We’ve read this one dozens of times already, and will probably be adding this to our “buy this book” lit. It’s fantastic, and I was so impressed with the illustrations, and how the author tells the story with such limited vocabulary.

MooMoo!Moo! by David LaRochelle, illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka by David LaRochelle, illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka
My kids (yes, both of them) laughed and laughed and laughed at this one. Another one we may end up buying. Lots of fun to read aloud, if you’re willing to really throw yourself into it and get expressive. 🙂

The Day the Crayons QuitThe Day the Crayons QuitThe Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers
Another hit this month, and now we want to read the sequel, The Day the Crayons Came HomeThe Day the Crayons Came Home by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers.

The Firekeeper’s SonThe Firekeeper’s SonThe Firekeeper's Son by Linda Sue Park, illustrated by Julie Downing by Linda Sue Park, illustrated by Julie Downing
Not a favorite for my kids, but one I may try again in another six months or so. I liked the idea of it more than the book itself, which didn’t keep their interest.

Hanna’s Cold WinterHanna’s Cold WinterHanna's Cold Winter by Trish Marx, illustrated by Barbara Knutson by Trish Marx, illustrated by Barbara Knutson
I wasn’t sure if my kids would care about it, but they loved it! We read it several times the first week after borrowing it, and then they kept it in their room to reread it (or “reread” it) as desired.

The Story of FerdinandThe Story of FerdinandThe Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson
My kids were not as interested in this as I expected them to be. I was overcome by nostalgia when reading it, so I’m sure that colored my expectations, but still: come on kids, this is a classic!

Bears Don’t Read by Emma Chichester ClarkBear’s Don’t Read by Emma Chichester Clark
Very cute story, with sweet illustrations (and great expressions on the bear’s face). I liked the ending quite a bit, and though I wasn’t sure how the kids would like it, they were enthralled!

Secrets of the Seashore by Carron Brown, illustrated by Alyssa NassnerSecrets of the Seashore by Carron Brown, illustrated by Alyssa Nassner
Nonfiction picture book, and my kids loved the flashlight trick this book includes (when you shine a light behind the page you see hidden illustrations). What could have just been a gimmick was pretty well-done at adding to the information.

CinderellaCinderella (retold by Susanna Davidson, illustrated by Lorena Alvarez)
The familiar story, with some subtle variations. My daughter (princess-obsessed as she is) claimed this book for her own, and she loved how she already knew the story. Nicely illustrated.

GossieGossieGossie (Gossie & Friends) by Olivier Dunrea by Olivier Dunrea
Cute enough, but not one I felt compelled to read again, and not one the kids asked to hear more than once.

Double PinkDouble PinkDouble Pink by Kate Feiffer by Kate Feiffer
Meh. My daughter’s pick, and it isn’t one I’d recommend you make any effort to find. If you also have a pink-obsessed daughter and can find it at the library, she’d probably be delighted.

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Previously on The Deliberate Reader

One year ago: Book Review: Etiquette and Espionage by Gail Carriger
Two years ago: Book Review: Far from Home by Mary Herring Wright
Three years ago: Why to Track the Books You Read

Comments

  1. Moo is a pretty amazing book. My kids also liked it very much.

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